Select Page

VATICAN – INSTRUCTION ON RESPECT FOR HUMAN LIFE IN ITS ORIGIN AND ON THE DIGNITY OF PROCREATION REPLIES TO CERTAIN QUESTIONS OF THE DAY – – INSTRUCTION DONUM VITAE SUR LE RESPECT DE LA VIE HUMAINE NAISSANTE ET LA DIGNITÉ DE LA PROCRÉATION. RÉPONSES A QUELQUES QUESTIONS D’ACTUALITÉ

VATICAN – INSTRUCTION ON RESPECT FOR HUMAN LIFE IN ITS ORIGIN  AND ON THE DIGNITY OF PROCREATION  REPLIES TO CERTAIN QUESTIONS OF THE DAY – – INSTRUCTION  DONUM VITAE  SUR LE RESPECT DE LA VIE HUMAINE NAISSANTE  ET LA DIGNITÉ DE LA PROCRÉATION. RÉPONSES A QUELQUES QUESTIONS D’ACTUALITÉ

http://www.vatican.va/roman_curia/congregations/cfaith/documents/rc_con_cfaith_doc_19870222_respect-for-human-life_en.html

 

Note: You can find the french version of this text below.

 

CONGREGATION FOR THE DOCTRINE OF THE FAITH


INSTRUCTION ON RESPECT FOR HUMAN LIFE IN ITS ORIGIN
AND ON THE DIGNITY OF PROCREATION
REPLIES TO CERTAIN QUESTIONS OF THE DAY

FOREWORD

The Congregation for the Doctrine of the Faith has been approached by various Episcopal Conferences or individual Bishops, by theologians, doctors and scientists, concerning biomedical techniques which make it possible to intervene in the initial phase of the life of a human being and in the very processes of procreation and their conformity with the principles of Catholic morality. The present Instruction, which is the result of wide consultation and in particular of a careful evaluation of the declarations made by Episcopates, does not intend to repeat all the Church's teaching on the dignity of human life as it originates and on procreation, but to offer, in the light of the previous teaching of the Magisterium, some specific replies to the main questions being asked in this regard. The exposition is arranged as follows: an introduction will recall the fundamental principles, of an anthropological and moral character, which are necessary for a proper evaluation of the problems and for working out replies to those questions; the first part will have as its subject respect for the human being from the first moment of his or her existence; the second part will deal with the moral questions raised by technical interventions on human procreation; the third part will offer some orientations on the relationships between moral law and civil law in terms of the respect due to human embryos and foetuses* and as regards the legitimacy of techniques of artificial procreation.

* The terms "zygote", "pre-embryo", "embryo" and "foetus" can indicate in the vocabulary of biology successive stages of the development of a human being. The present Instruction makes free use of these terms, attributing to them an identical ethical relevance, in order to designate the result (whether visible or not) of human generation, from the first moment of its existence until birth. The reason for this usage is clarified by the text (cf I, 1).

CONCLUSION

The spread of technologies of intervention in the processes of human procreation raises very serious moral problems in relation to the respect due to the human being from the moment of conception, to the dignity of the person, of his or her sexuality, and of the transmission of life. With this Instruction the Congregation for the Doctrine of the Faith, in fulfilling its responsibility to promote and defend the Church's teaching in so serious a matter, addresses a new and heartfelt invitation to all those who, by reason of their role and their commitment, can exercise a positive influence and ensure that, in the family and in society, due respect is accorded to life and love. It addresses this invitation to those responsible for the formation of consciences and of public opinion, to scientists and medical professionals, to jurists and politicians. It hopes that all will understand the incompatibility between recognition of the dignity of the human person and contempt for life and love, between faith in the living God and the claim to decide arbitrarily the origin and fate of a human being.

In particular, the Congregation for the Doctrine of the Faith addresses an invitation with confidence and encouragement to theologians, and above all to moralists, that they study more deeply and make eves more accessible to the faithful the contents of the teaching of the Church's Magisterium in the light of a valid anthropology in the matter of sexuality and marriage and in the context of the necessary interdisciplinary approach. Thus they will make it possible to understand ever more clearly the reasons for and the validity of this teaching. By defending man against the excesses of his own power, the Church of God reminds him of the reasons for his true nobility; only in this way can the possibility of living and loving with that dignity and liberty which derive from respect for the truth be ensured for the men and women of tomorrow. The precise indications which are offered in the present Instruction therefore are not meant to halt the effort of reflection but rather to give it a renewed impulse in unrenounceable fidelity to the teaching of the Church.

In the light of the truth about the gift of human life and in the light of the moral principles which flow from that truth, everyone is invited to act in the area of responsibility proper to each and, like the good Samaritan, to recognize as a neighbour even the littlest among the children of men (Cf . Lk 10: 2 9-37). Here Christ's words find a new and particular echo: "What you do to one of the least of my brethren, you do unto me" (Mt 25:40).

During an audience granted to the undersigned Prefect after the plenary session of the Congregation for the Doctrine of the Faith, the Supreme Pontiff, John Paul II, approved this Instruction and ordered it to be published.

Given at Rome, from the Congregation for the Doctrine of the Faith, February 22, 1987, the Feast of the Chair of St. Peter, the Apostle.

INTRODUCTION

1. BIOMEDICAL RESEARCH AND THE TEACHING
OF THE CHURCH

The gift of life which God the Creator and Father has entrusted to man calls him to appreciate the inestimable value of what he has been given and to take responsibility for it: this fundamental principle must be placed at the centre of one's reflection in order to clarify and solve the moral problems raised by artificial interventions on life as it originates and on the processes of procreation. Thanks to the progress of the biological and medical sciences, man has at his disposal ever more effective therapeutic resources; but he can also acquire new powers, with unforeseeable consequences, over human life at its very beginning and in its first stages. Various procedures now make it possible to intervene not only in order to assist but also to dominate the processes of procreation. These techniques can enable man to "take in hand his own destiny", but they also expose him "to the temptation to go beyond the limits of a reasonable dominion over nature".(1) They might constitute progress in the service of man, but they also involve serious risks. Many people are therefore expressing an urgent appeal that in interventions on procreation the values and rights of the human person be safeguarded. Requests for clarification and guidance are coming not only from the faithful but also from those who recognize the Church as "an expert in humanity " (2) with a mission to serve the "civilization of love" (3) and of life.

The Church's Magisterium does not intervene on the basis of a particular competence in the area of the experimental sciences; but having taken account of the data of research and technology, it intends to put forward, by virtue of its evangelical mission and apostolic duty, the moral teaching corresponding to the dignity of the person and to his or her integral vocation. It intends to do so by expounding the criteria of moral judgment as regards the applications of scientific research and technology, especially in relation to human life and its beginnings. These criteria are the respect, defence and promotion of man, his "primary and fundamental right" to life,(4) his dignity as a person who is endowed with a spiritual soul and with moral responsibility (5) and who is called to beatific communion with God. The Church's intervention in this field is inspired also by the Love which she owes to man, helping him to recognize and respect his rights and duties. This love draws from the fount of Christ's love: as she contemplates the mystery of the Incarnate Word, the Church also comes to understand the "mystery of man"; (6) by proclaiming the Gospel of salvation, she reveals to man his dignity and invites him to discover fully the truth of his own being. Thus the Church once more puts forward the divine law in order to accomplish the work of truth and liberation. For it is out of goodness - in order to indicate the path of life - that God gives human beings his commandments and the grace to observe them: and it is likewise out of goodness - in order to help them persevere along the same path - that God always offers to everyone his forgiveness. Christ has compassion on our weaknesses: he is our Creator and Redeemer. May his spirit open men's hearts to the gift of God's peace and to an understanding of his precepts.

2. SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY
AT THE SERVICE OF THE HUMAN PERSON

God created man in his own image and likeness: "male and female he created them" (Gen 1: 27 ), entrusting to them the task of "having dominion over the earth" (Gen 1:28). Basic scientific research and applied research constitute a significant expression of this dominion of man over creation. Science and technology are valuable resources for man when placed at his service and when they promote his integral development for the benefit of all; but they cannot of themselves show the meaning of existence and of human progress. Being ordered to man, who initiates and develops them, they draw from the person and his moral values the indication of their purpose and the awareness of their limits.

It would on the one hand be illusory to claim that scientific research and its applications are morally neutral; on the other hand one cannot derive criteria for guidance from mere technical efficiency, from research's possible usefulness to some at the expense of others, or, worse still, from prevailing ideologies. Thus science and technology require, for their own intrinsic meaning, an unconditional respect for the fundamental criteria of the moral law: that is to say, they must be at the service of the human person, of his inalienable rights and his true and integral good according to the design and will of God.(7) The rapid development of technological discoveries gives greater urgency to this need to respect the criteria just mentioned: science without conscience can only lead to man's ruin. "Our era needs such wisdom more than bygone ages if the discoveries made by man are to be further humanized. For the future of the world stands in peril unless wiser people are forthcoming".(8)

3. ANTHROPOLOGY AND PROCEDURES
IN THE BIOMEDICAL FIELD

Which moral criteria must be applied in order to clarify the problems posed today in the field of biomedicine? The answer to this question presupposes a proper idea of the nature of the human person in his bodily dimension.

For it is only in keeping with his true nature that the human person can achieve self-realization as a "unified totality":(9) and this nature is at the same time corporal and spiritual. By virtue of its substantial union with a spiritual soul, the human body cannot be considered as a mere complex of tissues, organs and functions, nor can it be evaluated in the same way as the body of animals; rather it is a constitutive part of the person who manifests and expresses himself through it. The natural moral law expresses and lays down the purposes, rights and duties which are based upon the bodily and spiritual nature of the human person. Therefore this law cannot be thought of as simply a set of norms on the biological level; rather it must be defined as the rational order whereby man is called by the Creator to direct and regulate his life and actions and in particular to make use of his own body.(10) A first consequence can be deduced from these principles: an intervention on the human body affects not only the tissues, the organs and their functions but also involves the person himself on different levels. It involves, therefore, perhaps in an implicit but nonetheless real way, a moral significance and responsibility. Pope John Paul II forcefully reaffirmed this to the World Medical Association when he said: "Each human person, in his absolutely unique singularity, is constituted not only by his spirit, but by his body as well. Thus, in the body and through the body, one touches the person himself in his concrete reality. To respect the dignity of man consequently amounts to safeguarding this identity of the man 'corpore et anima unus', as the Second Vatican Council says (Gaudium et Spes, 14, par.1). It is on the basis of this anthropological vision that one is to find the fundamental criteria for decision-making in the case of procedures which are not strictly therapeutic, as, for example, those aimed at the improvement of the human biological condition".(11)

Applied biology and medicine work together for the integral good of human life when they come to the aid of a person stricken by illness and infirmity and when they respect his or her dignity as a creature of God. No biologist or doctor can reasonably claim, by virtue of his scientific competence, to be able to decide on people's origin and destiny. This norm must be applied in a particular way in the field of sexuality and procreation, in which man and woman actualize the fundamental values of love and life. God, who is love and life, has inscribed in man and woman the vocation to share in a special way in his mystery of personal communion and in his work as Creator and Father.(12) For this reason marriage possesses specific goods and values in its union and in procreation which cannot be likened to those existing in lower forms of life. Such values and meanings are of the personal order and determine from the moral point of view the meaning and limits of artificial interventions on procreation and on the origin of human life. These interventions are not to be rejected on the grounds that they are artificial. As such, they bear witness to the possibilities of the art of medicine. But they must be given a moral evaluation in reference to the dignity of the human person, who is called to realize his vocation from God to the gift of love and the gift of life.

4. FUNDAMENTAL CRITERIA FOR A MORAL JUDGMENT

The fundamental values connected with the techniques of artificial human procreation are two: the life of the human being called into existence and the special nature of the transmission of human life in marriage. The moral judgment on such methods of artificial procreation must therefore be formulated in reference to these values.

Physical life, with which the course of human life in the world begins, certainly does not itself contain the whole of a person's value, nor does it represent the supreme good of man who is called to eternal life. However it does constitute in a certain way the "fundamental " value of life, precisely because upon this physical life all the other values of the person are based and developed.(13) The inviolability of the innocent human being's right to life "from the moment of conception until death" (14) is a sign and requirement of the very inviolability of the person to whom the Creator has given the gift of life. By comparison with the transmission of other forms of life in the universe, the transmission of human life has a special character of its own, which derives from the special nature of the human person. "The transmission of human life is entrusted by nature to a personal and conscious act and as such is subject to the all-holy laws of God: immutable and inviolable laws which must be recognized and observed. For this reason one cannot use means and follow methods which could be licit in the transmission of the life of plants and animals" (15)

Advances in technology have now made it possible to procreate apart from sexual relations through the meeting in vitro of the germ-cells previously taken from the man and the woman. But what is technically possible is not for that very reason morally admissible. Rational reflection on the fundamental values of life and of human procreation is therefore indispensable for formulating a moral evaluation of such technological interventions on a human being from the first stages of his development.

5. TEACHINGS OF THE MAGISTERIUM

On its part, the Magisterium of the Church offers to human reason in this field too the light of Revelation: the doctrine concerning man taught by the Magisterium contains many elements which throw light on the problems being faced here. From the moment of conception, the life of every human being is to be respected in an absolute way because man is the only creature on earth that God has "wished for himself " (16) and the spiritual soul of each man is "immediately created" by God; (17) his whole being bears the image of the Creator. Human life is sacred because from its beginning it involves "the creative action of God" (18) and it remains forever in a special relationship with the Creator, who is its sole end.(19) God alone is the Lord of life from its beginning until its end: no one can, in any circumstance, claim for himself the right to destroy directly an innocent human being. (20) Human procreation requires on the part of the spouses responsible collaboration with the fruitful love of God; (21) the gift of human life must be actualized in marriage through the specific and exclusive acts of husband and wife, in accordance with the laws inscribed in their persons and in their union.(22)

I. RESPECT FOR HUMAN EMBRYOS

Careful reflection on this teaching of the Magisterium and on the evidence of reason, as mentioned above, enables us to respond to the numerous moral problems posed by technical interventions upon the human being in the first phases of his life and upon the processes of his conception.

1. WHAT RESPECT IS DUE TO THE HUMAN EMBRYO, TAKING INTO ACCOUNT HIS NATURE AND IDENTITY?

The human being must be respected - as a person - from the very first instant of his existence. The implementation of procedures of artificial fertilization has made possible various interventions upon embryos and human foetuses. The aims pursued are of various kinds: diagnostic and therapeutic, scientific and commercial. From all of this, serious problems arise. Can one speak of a right to experimentation upon human embryos for the purpose of scientific research? What norms or laws should be worked out with regard to this matter? The response to these problems presupposes a detailed reflection on the nature and specific identity - the word "status" is used - of the human embryo itself .

At the Second Vatican Council, the Church for her part presented once again to modern man her constant and certain doctrine according to which: "Life once conceived, must be protected with the utmost care; abortion and infanticide are abominable crimes". (23) More recently, the Charter of the Rights of the Family, published by the Holy See, confirmed that "Human life must be absolutely respected and protected from the moment of conception".(24)

This Congregation is aware of the current debates concerning the beginning of human life, concerning the individuality of the human being and concerning the identity of the human person. The Congregation recalls the teachings found in the Declaration on Procured Abortion: "From the time that the ovum is fertilized, a new life is begun which is neither that of the father nor of the mother; it is rather the life of a new human being with his own growth. It would never be made human if it were not human already. To this perpetual evidence ... modern genetic science brings valuable confirmation. It has demonstrated that, from the first instant, the programme is fixed as to what this living being will be: a man, this individual-man with his characteristic aspects already well determined. Right from fertilization is begun the adventure of a human life, and each of its great capacities requires time ... to find its place and to be in a position to act". (25) This teaching remains valid and is further confirmed, if confirmation were needed, by recent findings of human biological science which recognize that in the zygote* resulting from fertilization the biological identity of a new human individual is already constituted. Certainly no experimental datum can be in itself sufficient to bring us to the recognition of a spiritual soul; nevertheless, the conclusions of science regarding the human embryo provide a valuable indication for discerning by the use of reason a personal presence at the moment of this first appearance of a human life: how could a human individual not be a human person? The Magisterium has not expressly committed itself to an affirmation of a philosophical nature, but it constantly reaffirms the moral condemnation of any kind of procured abortion. This teaching has not been changed and is unchangeable.(26)

Thus the fruit of human generation, from the first moment of its existence, that is to say from the moment the zygote has formed, demands the unconditional respect that is morally due to the human being in his bodily and spiritual totality. The human being is to be respected and treated as a person from the moment of conception; and therefore from that same moment his rights as a person must be recognized, among which in the first place is the inviolable right of every innocent human being to life. This doctrinal reminder provides the fundamental criterion for the solution of the various problems posed by the development of the biomedical sciences in this field: since the embryo must be treated as a person, it must also be defended in its integrity, tended and cared for, to the extent possible, in the same way as any other human being as far as medical assistance is concerned.

* The zygote is the cell produced when the nuclei of the two gametes have fused.

2. IS PRENATAL DIAGNOSIS MORALLY LICIT?

If prenatal diagnosis respects the life and integrity of the embryo and the human foetus and is directed towards its safeguarding or healing as an individual, then the answer is affirmative.

For prenatal diagnosis makes it possible to know the condition of the embryo and of the foetus when still in the mother's womb. It permits, or makes it possible to anticipate earlier and more effectively, certain therapeutic, medical or surgical procedures. Such diagnosis is permissible, with the consent of the parents after they have been adequately informed, if the methods employed safeguard the life and integrity of the embryo and the mother, without subjecting them to disproportionate risks.(27) But this diagnosis is gravely opposed to the moral law when it is done with the thought of possibly inducing an abortion depending upon the results: a diagnosis which shows the existence of a malformation or a hereditary illness must not be the equivalent of a death-sentence. Thus a woman would be committing a gravely illicit act if she were to request such a diagnosis with the deliberate intention of having an abortion should the results confirm the existence of a malformation or abnormality. The spouse or relatives or anyone else would similarly be acting in a manner contrary to the moral law if they were to counsel or impose such a diagnostic procedure on the expectant mother with the same intention of possibly proceeding to an abortion. So too the specialist would be guilty of illicit collaboration if, in conducting the diagnosis and in communicating its results, he were deliberately to contribute to establishing or favouring a link between prenatal diagnosis and abortion. In conclusion, any directive or programme of the civil and health authorities or of scientific organizations which in any way were to favour a link between prenatal diagnosis and abortion, or which were to go as far as directly to induce expectant mothers to submit to prenatal diagnosis planned for the purpose of eliminating foetuses which are affected by malformations or which are carriers of hereditary illness, is to be condemned as a violation of the unborn child's right to life and as an abuse of the prior rights and duties of the spouses,

3. ARE THERAPEUTIC PROCEDURES CARRIED OUT ON THE HUMAN EMBRYO LICIT?

As with all medical interventions on patients, one must uphold as licit procedures carried out on the human embryo which respect the life and integrity of the embryo and do not involve disproportionate risks for it but are directed towards its healing, the improvement of its condition of health, or its individual survival. Whatever the type of medical, surgical or other therapy, the free and informed consent of the parents is required, according to the deontological rules followed in the case of children. The application of this moral principle may call for delicate and particular precautions in the case of embryonic or foetal life. The legitimacy and criteria of such procedures have been clearly stated by Pope John Paul II: "A strictly therapeutic intervention whose explicit objective is the healing of various maladies such as those stemming from chromosomal defects will, in principle, be considered desirable, provided it is directed to the true promotion of the personal well-being of the individual without doing harm to his integrity or worsening his conditions of life. Such an intervention would indeed fall within the logic of the Christian moral tradition" (28)

4. HOW IS ONE TO EVALUATE MORALLY RESEARCH AND EXPERIMENTATION* ON HUMAN EMBRYOS AND FOETUSES?

Medical research must refrain from operations on live embryos, unless there is a moral certainty of not causing harm to the life or integrity of the unborn child and the mother, and on condition that the parents have givers their free and in formed consent to the procedure. It follows that all research, even when limited to the simple observation of the embryo, would become illicit were it to involve risk to the embryo's physical integrity or life by reason of the methods used or the effects induced. As regards experimentation, and presupposing the general distinction between experi;'nentation for purposes which are not directly therapeutic and experimentation which is clearly therapeutic for the subject himself, in the case in point one must also distinguish between experimentation carried out on embryos which are still alive and experimentation carried out on embryos which are dead. If the embryos are living, whether viable or not, they must be respected just like any other human person; experimentation on embryos which is not directly therapeutic is illicit.(29) No objective, even though noble in itself, such as a foreseeable advantage to science, to other human beings or to society, can in any way justify experimentation on living human embryos or foetuses, whether viable or not, either inside or outside the mother's womb. The informed consent ordinarily required for clinical experimentation on adults cannot be granted by the parents, who may not freely dispose of the physical integrity or life of the unborn child. Moreover, experimentation on embryos and foetuses always involves risk, and indeed in most cases it involves the certain expectation of harm to their physical integrity or even their death. To use human embryos or foetuses as the object or instrument of experimentation constitutes a crime against their dignity as human beings having a right to the same respect that is due to the child already born and to every human person.

The Charter of the Rights of the Family published by the Holy See affirms: "Respect for the dignity of the human being excludes all experimental manipulation or exploitation of the human embryo".(30) The practice of keeping alive human embryos in vivo or in vitro for experimental or commercial purposes is totally opposed to human dignity. In the case of experimentation that is clearly therapeutic, namely, when it is a matter of experimental forms of therapy used for the benefit of the embryo itself in a final attempt to save its life, and in the absence of other reliable forms of therapy, recourse to drugs or procedures not yet fully tested can be licit (31)

The corpses of human embryos and foetuses, whether they have been deliberately aborted or not, must be respected just as the remains of other human beings. In particular, they cannot be subjected to mutilation or to autopsies if their death has not yet been verified and without the consent of the parents or of the mother. Furthermore, the moral requirements must be safeguarded that there be no complicity in deliberate abortion and that the risk of scandal be avoided. Also, in the case of dead foetuses, as for the corpses of adult persons, all commercial trafficking must be considered illicit and should be prohibited.

* Since the terms "research" and "experimentation" are often used equivalently and ambiguously, it is deemed necessary to specify the exact meaning given them in this document.

1) By research is meant any inductive-deductive process which aims at promoting the systematic observation of a given phenomenon in the human field or at verifying a hypothesis arising from previous observations.

2) By experimentation is meant any research in which the human being (in the various stages of his existence: embryo, foetus, child or adult) represents the object through which or upon which one intends to verify the effect, at present unknown or not sufficiently known, of a given treatment (e.g. pharmacological, teratogenic, surgical, etc.).

5. HOW IS ONE TO EVALUATE MORALLY THE USE FOR RESEARCH PURPOSES OF EMBRYOS OBTAINED BY FERTILIZATION 'IN VITRO'?

Human embryos obtained in vitro are human beings and subjects with rights: their dignity and right to life must be respected from the first moment of their existence. It is immoral to produce human embryos destined to be exploited as disposable "biological material". In the usual practice of in vitro fertilization, not all of the embryos are transferred to the woman's body; some are destroyed. Just as the Church condemns induced abortion, so she also forbids acts against the life of these human beings. It is a duty to condemn the particular gravity of the voluntary destruction of human embryos obtained 'in vitro' for the sole purpose of research, either by means of artificial insemination of by means of "twin fission". By acting in this way the researcher usurps the place of God; and, even though he may be unaware of this, he sets himself up as the master of the destiny of others inasmuch as he arbitrarily chooses whom he will allow to live and whom he will send to death and kills defenceless human beings.

Methods of observation or experimentation which damage or impose grave and disproportionate risks upon embryos obtained in vitro are morally illicit for the same reasons. every human being is to be respected for himself, and cannot be reduced in worth to a pure and simple instrument for the advantage of others. It is therefore not in conformity with the moral law deliberately to expose to death human embryos obtained 'in vitro'. In consequence of the fact that they have been produced in vitro, those embryos which art not transferred into the body of the mother and are called "spare" are exposed to an absurd fate, with no possibility of their being offered safe means of survival which can be licitly pursued.

6. WHAT JUDGMENT SHOULD BE MADE ON OTHER PROCEDURES OF MANIPULATING EMBRYOS CONNECTED WITH THE "TECHNIQUES OF HUMAN REPRODUCTION"?

Techniques of fertilization in vitro can open the way to other forms of biological and genetic manipulation of human embryos, such as attempts or plans for fertilization between human and animal gametes and the gestation of human embryos in the uterus of animals, or the hypothesis or project of constructing artificial uteruses for the human embryo. These procedures are contrary to the human dignity proper to the embryo, and at the same time they are contrary to the right of every person to be conceived and to be born within marriage and from marriage.(32) Also, attempts or hypotheses for obtaining a human being without any connection with sexuality through "twin fission", cloning or parthenogenesis are to be considered contrary to the moral law, since they are in opposition to the dignity both of human procreation and of the conjugal union.

The freezing of embryos, even when carried out in order to preserve the life of an embryo - cryopreservation - constitutes an offence against the respect due to human beings by exposing them to grave risks of death or harm to their physical integrity and depriving them, at least temporarily, of maternal shelter and gestation, thus placing them in a situation in which further offences and manipulation are possible.

Certain attempts to influence chromosomic or genetic inheritance are not therapeutic but are aimed at producing human beings selected according to sex or other predetermined qualities. These manipulations are contrary to the personal dignity of the human being and his or her integrity and identity. Therefore in no way can they be justified on the grounds of possible beneficial consequences for future humanity. (33) Every person must be respected for himself: in this consists the dignity and right of every human being from his or her beginning.

II. INTERVENTIONS UPON HUMAN PROCREATION

By "artificial procreation" or " artificial fertilization" are understood here the different technical procedures directed towards obtaining a human conception in a manner other than the sexual union of man and woman. This Instruction deals with fertilization of an ovum in a test-tube (in vitro fertilization) and artificial insemination through transfer into the woman's genital tracts of previously collected sperm.

A preliminary point for the moral evaluation of such technical procedures is constituted by the consideration of the circumstances and consequences which those procedures involve in relation to the respect due the human embryo. Development of the practice of in vitrofertilization has required innumerable fertilizations and destructions of human embryos. Even today, the usual practice presupposes a hyperovulation on the part of the woman: a number of ova are withdrawn, fertilized and then cultivated in vitro for some days. Usually not all are transferred into the genital tracts of the woman; some embryos, generally called "spare ", are destroyed or frozen. On occasion, some of the implanted embryos are sacrificed for various eugenic, economic or psychological reasons. Such deliberate destruction of human beings or their utilization for different purposes to the detriment of their integrity and life is contrary to the doctrine on procured abortion already recalled. The connection between in vitro fertilization and the voluntary destruction of human embryos occurs too often. This is significant: through these procedures, with apparently contrary purposes, life and death are subjected to the decision of man, who thus sets himself up as the giver of life and death by decree. This dynamic of violence and domination may remain unnoticed by those very individuals who, in wishing to utilize this procedure, become subject to it themselves. The facts recorded and the cold logic which links them must be taken into consideration for a moral judgment on IVF and ET (in vitro fertilization and embryo transfer): the abortion-mentality which has made this procedure possible thus leads, whether one wants it or not, to man's domination over the life and death of his fellow human beings and can lead to a system of radical eugenics.

Nevertheless, such abuses do not exempt one from a further and thorough ethical study of the techniques of artificial procreation considered in themselves, abstracting as far as possible from the destruction of embryos produced in vitro. The present Instruction will therefore take into consideration in the first place the problems posed by heterologous artificial fertilization (II, 1-3), * and subsequently those linked with homologous artificial fertilization (II, 4-6 ) .** Before formulating an ethical judgment on each of these procedures, the principles and values which determine the moral evaluation of each of them will be considered.

* By the term heterologous artificial fertilization or procreation, the Instruction means techniques used to obtain a human conception artificially by the use of gametes coming from at least one donor other than the spouses who are joined in marriage. Such techniques can be of two types

a) Heterologous IVF and ET: the technique used to obtain a human conception through the meeting in vitro of gametes taken from at least one donor other than the two spouses joined in marriage.

b) Heterologous artifical insemination: the technique used to obtain a human conception through the transfer into the genital tracts of the woman of the sperm previously collected from a donor other than the husband.

** By artificial homologous fertilization or procreation, the Instruction means the technique used to obtain a human conception using the gametes of the two spouses joined in marriage. Homologous artificial fertilization can be carried out by two different methods:

a) Homologous IVF and ET: the technique used to obtain a human conception through the meeting in vitro of the gametes of the spouses joined in marriage.

b) Homologous artificial insemination: the technique used to obtain a human conception through the transfer into the genital tracts of a married woman of the sperm previously collected from her husband.

A. HETEROLOGOUS ARTIFICIAL FERTILIZATION

1. WHY MUST HUMAN PROCREATION TAKE PLACE IN MARRIAGE?

Every human being is always to be accepted as a gift and blessing of God. However, from the moral point of view a truly responsible procreation vis-à-vis the unborn child must be the fruit of marriage.

For human procreation has specific characteristics by virtue of the personal dignity of the parents and of the children: the procreation of a new person, whereby the man and the woman collaborate with the power of the Creator, must be the fruit and the sign of the mutual self-giving of the spouses, of their love and of their fidelity.(34) The fidelity of the spouses in the unity of marriage involves reciprocal respect of their right to become a father and a mother only through each other. The child has the right to be conceived, carried in the womb, brought into the world and brought up within marriage: it is through the secure and recognized relationship to his own parents that the child can discover his own identity and achieve his own proper human development. The parents find in their child a confirmation and completion of their reciprocal self-giving: the child is the living image of their love, the permanent sign of their conjugal union, the living and indissoluble concrete expression of their paternity and maternity, (35) By reason of the vocation and social responsibilities of the person, the good of the children and of the parents contributes to the good of civil society; the vitality and stability of society require that children come into the world within a family and that the family be firmly based on marriage. The tradition of the Church and anthropological reflection recognize in marriage and in its indissoluble unity the only setting worthy of truly responsible procreation.

2. DOES HETEROLOGOUS ARTIFICIAL FERTILIZATION CONFORM TO THE DIGNITY OF THE COUPLE AND TO THE TRUTH OF MARRIAGE?

Through IVF and ET and heterologous artificial insemination, human conception is achieved through the fusion of gametes of at least one donor other than the spouses who are united in marriage. Heterologous artificial fertilization is contrary to the unity of marriage, to the dignity of the spouses, to the vocation proper to parents, and to the child's right to be conceived and brought into the world in marriage and from marriage.(36) Respect for the unity of marriage and for conjugal fidelity demands that the child be conceived in marriage; the bond existing between husband and wife accords the spouses, in an objective and inalienable manner, the exclusive right to become father and mother solely through each other.(37) Recourse to the gametes of a third person, in order to have sperm or ovum available, constitutes a violation of the reciprocal commitment of the spouses and a grave lack in regard to that essential property of marriage which is its unity. Heterologous artificial fertilization violates the rights of the child; it deprives him of his filial relationship with his parental origins and can hinder the maturing of his personal identity. Furthermore, it offends the common vocation of the spouses who are called to fatherhood and motherhood: it objectively deprives conjugal fruitfulness of its unity and integrity; it brings about and manifests a rupture between genetic parenthood, gestational parenthood and responsibility for upbringing. Such damage to the personal relationships within the family has repercussions on civil society: what threatens the unity and stability of the family is a source of dissension, disorder and injustice in the whole of social life. These reasons lead to a negative moral judgment concerning heterologous artificial fertilization: consequently fertilization of a married woman with the sperm of a donor different from her husband and fertilization with the husband's sperm of an ovum not coming from his wife are morally illicit. Furthermore, the artificial fertilization of a woman who is unmarried or a widow, whoever the donor may be, cannot be morally justified.

The desire to have a child and the love between spouses who long to obviate a sterility which cannot be overcome in any other way constitute understandable motivations; but subjectively good intentions do not render heterologous artificial fertilization conformable to the objective and inalienable properties of marriage or respectful of the rights of the child and of the spouses.

3. IS "SURROGATE"* MOTHERHOOD MORALLY LICIT?

No, for the same reasons which lead one to reject heterologous artificial fertilization: for it is contrary to the unity of marriage and to the dignity of the procreation of the human person. Surrogate motherhood represents an objective failure to meet the obligations of maternal love, of conjugal fidelity and of responsible motherhood; it offends the dignity and the right of the child to be conceived, carried in the womb, brought into the world and brought up by his own parents; it sets up, to the detriment of families, a division between the physical, psychological and moral elements which constitute those families.

* By "surrogate mother" the Instruction means:

a) the woman who carries in pregnancy an embryo implanted in her uterus and who is genetically a stranger to the embryo because it has been obtained through the union of the gametes of "donors". She carries the pregnancy with a pledge to surrender the baby once it is born to the party who commissioned or made the agreement for the pregnancy.

b) the woman who carries in pregnancy an embryo to whose procreation she has contributed the donation of her own ovum, fertilized through insemination with the sperm of a man other than her husband. She carries the pregnancy with a pledge to surrender the child once it is born to the party who commissioned or made the agreement for the pregnancy.

B. HOMOLOGOUS ARTIFICIAL FERTILIZATION

Since heterologous artificial fertilization has been declared unacceptable, the question arises of how to evaluate morally the process of homologous artificial fertilization: IVF and ET and artificial insemination between husband and wife. First a question of principle must be clarified.

4. WHAT CONNECTION IS REQUIRED FROM THE MORAL POINT OF VIEW BETWEEN PROCREATION AND THE CONJUGAL ACT?

a) The Church's teaching on marriage and human procreation affirms the "inseparable connection, willed by God and unable to be broken by man on his own initiative, between the two meanings of the conjugal act: the unitive meaning and the procreative meaning. Indeed, by its intimate structure, the conjugal act, while most closely uniting husband and wife, capacitates them for the generation of new lives, according to laws inscribed in the very being of man and of woman".(38) This principle, which is based upon the nature of marriage and the intimate connection of the goods of marriage, has well-known consequences on the level of responsible fatherhood and motherhood. "By safeguarding both these essential aspects, the unitive and the procreative, the conjugal act preserves in its fullness the sense of true mutual love and its ordination towards man's exalted vocation to parenthood".(39) The same doctrine concerning the link between the meanings of the conjugal act and between the goods of marriage throws light on the moral problem of homologous artificial fertilization, since "it is never permitted to separate these different aspects to such a degree as positively to exclude either the procreative intention or the conjugal relation" (40) Contraception deliberately deprives the conjugal act of its openness to procreation and in this way brings about a voluntary dissociation of the ends of marriage. Homologous artificial fertilization, in seeking a procreation which is not the fruit of a specific act of conjugal union, objectively effects an analogous separation between the goods and the meanings of marriage. Thus, fertilization is licitly sought when it is the result of a "conjugal act which is per se suitable for the generation of children to which marriage is ordered by its nature and by which the spouses become one flesh".(41) But from the moral point of view procreation is deprived of its proper perfection when it is not desired as the fruit of the conjugal act, that is to say of the specific act of the spouses' union.

b ) The moral value of the intimate link between the goods of marriage and between the meanings of the conjugal act is based upon the unity of the human being, a unity involving body and spiritual soul. (42) Spouses mutually express their personal love in the "language of the body ", which clearly involves both "sponsal meanings" and parental ones.(43) The conjugal act by which the couple mutually express their self-gift at the same time expresses openness to the gift of life. It is an act that is inseparably corporal and spiritual. It is in their bodies and through their bodies that the spouses consummate their marriage and are able to become father and mother. In order to respect the language of their bodies and their natural generosity, the conjugal union must take place with respect for its openness to procreation; and the procreation of a person must be the fruit and the result of married love. The origin of the human being thus follows from a procreation that is "linked to the union, not only biological but also spiritual, of the parents, made one by the bond of marriage".(44) Fertilization achieved outside the bodies of the couple remains by this very fact deprived of the meanings and the values which are expressed in the language of the body and in the union of human persons.

c) Only respect for the link between the meanings of the conjugal act and respect for the unity of the human being make possible procreation in conformity with the dignity of the person. In his unique and irrepeatable origin, the child must be respected and recognized as equal in personal dignity to those who give him life. The human person must be accepted in his parents' act of union and love; the generation of a child must therefore be the fruit of that mutual giving (45) which is realized in the conjugal act wherein the spouses cooperate as servants and not as masters in the work of the Creator who is Love. In reality, the origin of a human person is the result of an act of giving. The one conceived must be the fruit of his parents' love. He cannot be desired or conceived as the product of an intervention of medical or biological techniques; that would be equivalent to reducing him to an object of scientific technology. No one may subject the coming of a child into the world to conditions of technical efficiency which are to be evaluated according to standards of control and dominion. The moral relevance of the link between the meanings of the conjugal act and between the goods of marriage, as well as the unity of the human being and the dignity of his origin, demand that the procreation of a human person be brought about as the fruit of the conjugal act specific to the love between spouses.The link between procreation and the conjugal act is thus shown to be of great importance on the anthropological and moral planes, and it throws light on the positions of the Magisterium with regard to homologous artificial fertilization.

5. IS HOMOLOGOUS 'IN VITRO' FERTILIZATION MORALLY LICIT?

The answer to this question is strictly dependent on the principles just mentioned. Certainly one cannot ignore the legitimate aspirations of sterile couples. For some, recourse to homologous IVF and ET appears to be the only way of fulfilling their sincere desire for a child. The question is asked whether the totality of conjugal life in such situations is not sufficient to ensure the dignity proper to human procreation. It is acknowledged that IVF and ET certainly cannot supply for the absence of sexual relations (47) and cannot be preferred to the specific acts of conjugal union, given the risks involved for the child and the difficulties of the procedure. But it is asked whether, when there is no other way of overcoming the sterility which is a source of suffering, homologous in vitro fertilization may not constitute an aid, if not a form of therapy, whereby its moral licitness could be admitted. The desire for a child - or at the very least an openness to the transmission of life - is a necessary prerequisite from the moral point of view for responsible human procreation. But this good intention is not sufficient for making a positive moral evaluation of in vitro fertilization between spouses. The process of IVF and ET must be judged in itself and cannot borrow its definitive moral quality from the totality of conjugal life of which it becomes part nor from the conjugal acts which may precede or follow it.(48)

It has already been recalled that, in the circumstances in which it is regularly practised, IVF and ET involves the destruction of human beings, which is something contrary to the doctrine on the illicitness of abortion previously mentioned.(49) But even in a situation in which every precaution were taken to avoid the death of human embryos, homologous IVF and ET dissociates from the conjugal act the actions which are directed to human fertilization. For this reason the very nature of homologous IVF and ET also must be taken into account, even abstracting from the link with procured abortion. Homologous IVF and ET is brought about outside the bodies of the couple through actions of third parties whose competence and technical activity determine the success of the procedure. Such fertilization entrusts the life and identity of the embryo into the power of doctors and biologists and establishes the domination of technology over the origin and destiny of the human person. Such a relationship of domination is in itself contrary to the dignity and equality that must be common to parents and children.

Conception in vitro is the result of the technical action which presides over fertilization. Such fertilization is neither in fact achieved nor positively willed as the expression and fruit of a specific act of the conjugal union. In homologous IVF and ET, therefore, even if it is considered in the context of 'de facto' existing sexual relations, the generation of the human person is objectively deprived of its proper perfection: namely, that of being the result and fruit of a conjugal act in which the spouses can become "cooperators with God for giving life to a new person".(50) These reasons enable us to understand why the act of conjugal love is considered in the teaching of the Church as the only setting worthy of human procreation. For the same reasons the so-called "simple case", i.e. a homologous IVF and ET procedure that is free of any compromise with the abortive practice of destroying embryos and with masturbation, remains a technique which is morally illicit because it deprives human procreation of the dignity which is proper and connatural to it. Certainly, homologous IVF and ET fertilization is not marked by all that ethical negativity found in extra-conjugal procreation; the family and marriage continue to constitute the setting for the birth and upbringing of the children. Nevertheless, in conformity with the traditional doctrine relating to the goods of marriage and the dignity of the person, the Church remain opposed from the moral point of view to homologous 'in vitro' fertilization. Such fertilization is in itself illicit and in opposition to the dignity of procreation and of the conjugal union, even when everything is done to avoid the death of the human embryo. Although the manner in which human conception is achieved with IVF and ET cannot be approved, every child which comes into the world must in any case be accepted as a living gift of the divine Goodness and must be brought up with love.

6. HOW IS HOMOLOGOUS ARTIFICIAL INSEMINATION TO BE EVALUATED FROM THE MORAL POINT OF VIEW?

Homologous artificial insemination within marriage cannot be admitted except for those cases in which the technical means is not a substitute for the conjugal act but serves to facilitate and to help so that the act attains its natural purpose.

The teaching of the Magisterium on this point has already been stated.(51) This teaching is not just an expression of particular historical circumstances but is based on the Church's doctrine concerning the connection between the conjugal union and procreation and on a consideration of the personal nature of the conjugal act and of human procreation. "In its natural structure, the conjugal act is a personal action, a simultaneous and immediate cooperation on the part of the husband and wife, which by the very nature of the agents and the proper nature of the act is the expression of the mutual gift which, according to the words of Scripture, brings about union 'in one flesh' ".(52) Thus moral conscience "does not necessarily proscribe the use of certain artificial means destined solely either to the facilitating of the natural act or to ensuring that the natural act normally performed achieves its proper end".(53) If the technical means facilitates the conjugal act or helps it to reach its natural objectives, it can be morally acceptable. If, on the other hand, the procedure were to replace the conjugal act, it is morally illicit. Artificial insemination as a substitute for the conjugal act is prohibited by reason of the voluntarily achieved dissociation of the two meanings of the conjugal act. Masturbation, through which the sperm is normally obtained, is another sign of this dissociation: even when it is done for the purpose of procreation, the act remains deprived of its unitive meaning: "It lacks the sexual relationship called for by the moral order, namely the relationship which realizes 'the full sense of mutual self-giving and human procreation in the context of true love' ".(54)

7. WHAT MORAL CRITERION CAN BE PROPOSED WITH REGARD TO MEDICAL INTERVENTION IN HUMAN PROCREATION?

The medical act must be evaluated not only with reference to its technical dimension but also and above all in relation to its goal which is the good of persons and their bodily and psychological health. The moral criteria for medical intervention in procreation are deduced from the dignity of human persons, of their sexuality and of their origin. Medicine which seeks to be ordered to the integral good of the person must respect the specifically human values of sexuality.(55) The doctor is at the service of persons and of human procreation. He does not have the authority to dispose of them or to decide their fate.

A medical intervention respects the dignity of persons when it seeks to assist the conjugal act either in order to facilitate its performance or in order to enable it to achieve its objective once it has been normally performed",(56) On the other hand, it sometimes happens that a medical procedure technologically replaces the conjugal act in order to obtain a procreation which is neither its result nor its fruit. In this case the medical act is not, as it should be, at the service of conjugal union but rather appropriates to itself the procreative function and thus contradicts the dignity and the inalienable rights of the spouses and of the child to be born. The humanization of medicine, which is insisted upon today by everyone, requires respect for the integral dignity of the human person first of all in the act and at the moment in which the spouses transmit life to a new person. It is only logical therefore to address an urgent appeal to Catholic doctors and scientists that they bear exemplary witness to the respect due to the human embryo and to the dignity of procreation. The medical and nursing staff of Catholic hospitals and clinics are in a special way urged to do justice to the moral obligations which they have assumed, frequently also, as part of their contract. Those who are in charge of Catholic hospitals and clinics and who are often Religious will take special care to safeguard and promote a diligent observance of the moral norms recalled in the present Instruction.

8. THE SUFFERING CAUSED BY INFERTILITY IN MARRIAGE

The suffering of spouses who cannot have children or who are afraid of bringing a handicapped child into the world is a suffering that everyone must understand and properly evaluate.

On the part of the spouses, the desire for a child is natural: it expresses the vocation to fatherhood and motherhood inscribed in conjugal love. This desire can be even stronger if the couple is affected by sterility which appears incurable. Nevertheless, marriage does not confer upon the spouses the right to have a child, but only the right to perform those natural acts which are per se ordered to procreation.(57) A true and proper right to a child would be contrary to the child's dignity and nature. The child is not an object to which one has a right, nor can he be considered as an object of ownership: rather, a child is a gift, "the supreme gift" (58) and the most gratuitous gift of marriage, and is a living testimony of the mutual giving of his parents. For this reason, the child has the right, as already mentioned, to be the fruit of the specific act of the conjugal love of his parents; and he also has the right to be respected as a person from the moment of his conception.

Nevertheless, whatever its cause or prognosis, sterility is certainly a difficult trial. The community of believers is called to shed light upon and support the suffering of those who are unable to fulfill their legitimate aspiration to motherhood and fatherhood. Spouses who find themselves in this sad situation are called to find in it an opportunity for sharing in a particular way in the Lord's Cross, the source of spiritual fruitfulness. Sterile couples must not forget that "even when procreation is not possible, conjugal life does not for this reason lose its value. Physical sterility in fact can be for spouses the occasion for other important services to the life of the human person, for example, adoption, various forms of educational work, and assistance to other families and to poor or handicapped children".(59) Many researchers are engaged in the fight against sterility. While fully safeguarding the dignity of human procreation, some have achieved results which previously seemed unattainable. Scientists therefore are to be encouraged to continue their research with the aim of preventing the causes of sterility and of being able to remedy them so that sterile couples will be able to procreate in full respect for their own personal dignity and that of the child to be born.

III. MORAL AND CIVIL LAW

THE VALUES AND MORAL OBLIGATIONS
THAT CIVIL LEGISLATION
MUST RESPECT AND SANCTION IN THIS MATTER

The inviolable right to life of every innocent human individual and the rights of the family and of the institution of marriage constitute fundamental moral values, because they concern the natural condition and integral vocation of the human person; at the same time they are constitutive elements of civil society and its order. For this reason the new technological possibilities which have opened up in the field of biomedicine require the intervention of the political authorities and of the legislator, since an uncontrolled application of such techniques could lead to unforeseeable and damaging consequences for civil society. Recourse to the conscience of each individual and to the self-regulation of researchers cannot be sufficient for ensuring respect for personal rights and public order. If the legislator responsible for the common good were not watchful, he could be deprived of his prerogatives by researchers claiming to govern humanity in the name of the biological discoveries and the alleged "improvement" processes which they would draw from those discoveries. "Eugenism" and forms of discrimination between human beings could come to be legitimized: this would constitute an act of violence and a serious offense to the equality, dignity and fundamental rights of the human person. The intervention of the public authority must be inspired by the rational principles which regulate the relationships between civil law and moral law. The task of the civil law is to ensure the common good of people through the recognition of and the defence of fundamental rights and through the promotion of peace and of public morality.(60) In no sphere of life can the civil law take the place of conscience or dictate norms concerning things which are outside its competence. It must sometimes tolerate, for the sake of public order, things which it cannot forbid without a greater evil resulting. However, the inalienable rights of the person must be recognized and respected by civil society and the political authority. These human rights depend neither on single individuals nor on parents; nor do they represent a concession made by society and the State: they pertain to human nature and are inherent in the person by virtue of the creative act from which the person took his of her origin. Among such fundamental rights one should mention in this regard:

a) every human being's right to life and physical integrity from the moment of conception until death; b) the rights of the family and of marriage as an institution and, in this area, the child's right to be conceived, brought into the world and brought up by his parents. To each of these two themes it is necessary here to give some further consideration.

In various States certain laws have authorized the direct suppression of innocents: the moment a positive law deprives a category of human beings of the protection which civil legislation must accord them, the State is denying the equality of all before the law. When the State does not place its power at the service of the rights of each citizen, and in particular of the more vulnerable, the very foundations of a State based on law are undermined. The political authority consequently cannot give approval to the calling of human beings into existence through procedures which would expose them to those very grave risks noted previously. The possible recognition by positive law and the political authorities of techniques of artificial transmission of life and the experimentation connected with it would widen the breach already opened by the legalization of abortion. As a consequence of the respect and protection which must be ensured for the unborn child from the moment of his conception, the law must provide appropriate penal sanctions for every deliberate violation of the child's rights. The law cannot tolerate - indeed it must expressly forbid - that human beings, even at the embryonic stage, should be treated as objects of experimentation, be mutilated or destroyed with the excuse that they are superfluous or incapable of developing normally.

The political authority is bound to guarantee to the institution of the family, upon which society is based, the juridical protection to which it has a right. From the very fact that it is at the service of people, the political authority must also be at the service of the family. Civil law cannot grant approval to techniques of artificial procreation which, for the benefit of third parties (doctors, biologists, economic or governmental powers), take away what is a right inherent in the relationship between spouses; and therefore civil law cannot legalize the donation of gametes between persons who are not legitimately united in marriage. Legislation must also prohibit, by virtue of the support which is due to the family, embryo banks, post mortem insemination and "surrogate motherhood". It is part of the duty of the public authority to ensure that the civil law is regulated according to the fundamental norms of the moral law in matters concerning human rights, human life and the institution of the family. Politicians must commit themselves, through their interventions upon public opinion, to securing in society the widest possible consensus on such essential points and to consolidating this consensus wherever it risks being weakened or is in danger of collapse.

In many countries, the legalization of abortion and juridical tolerance of unmarried couples makes it more difficult to secure respect for the fundamental rights recalled by this Instruction. It is to be hoped that States will not become responsible for aggravating these socially damaging situations of injustice. It is rather to be hoped that nations and States will realize all the cultural, ideological and political implications connected with the techniques of artificial procreation and will find the wisdom and courage necessary for issuing laws which are more just and more respectful of human life and the institution of the family. The civil legislation of many states confers an undue legitimation upon certain practices in the eyes of many today; it is seen to be incapable of guaranteeing that morality which is in conformity with the natural exigencies of the human person and with the "unwritten laws" etched by the Creator upon the human heart. All men of good will must commit themselves, particularly within their professional field and in the exercise of their civil rights, to ensuring the reform of morally unacceptable civil laws and the correction of illicit practices. In addition, "conscientious objection" vis-à-vis such laws must be supported and recognized. A movement of passive resistance to the legitimation of practices contrary to human life and dignity is beginning to make an ever sharper impression upon the moral conscience of many, especially among specialists in the biomedical sciences.

CONCLUSION

The spread of technologies of intervention in the processes of human procreation raises very serious moral problems in relation to the respect due to the human being from the moment of conception, to the dignity of the person, of his or her sexuality, and of the transmission of life. With this Instruction the Congregation for the Doctrine of the Faith, in fulfilling its responsibility to promote and defend the Church's teaching in so serious a matter, addresses a new and heartfelt invitation to all those who, by reason of their role and their commitment, can exercise a positive influence and ensure that, in the family and in society, due respect is accorded to life and love. It addresses this invitation to those responsible for the formation of consciences and of public opinion, to scientists and medical professionals, to jurists and politicians. It hopes that all will understand the incompatibility between recognition of the dignity of the human person and contempt for life and love, between faith in the living God and the claim to decide arbitrarily the origin and fate of a human being.

In particular, the Congregation for the Doctrine of the Faith addresses an invitation with confidence and encouragement to theologians, and above all to moralists, that they study more deeply and make eves more accessible to the faithful the contents of the teaching of the Church's Magisterium in the light of a valid anthropology in the matter of sexuality and marriage and in the context of the necessary interdisciplinary approach. Thus they will make it possible to understand ever more clearly the reasons for and the validity of this teaching. By defending man against the excesses of his own power, the Church of God reminds him of the reasons for his true nobility; only in this way can the possibility of living and loving with that dignity and liberty which derive from respect for the truth be ensured for the men and women of tomorrow. The precise indications which are offered in the present Instruction therefore are not meant to halt the effort of reflection but rather to give it a renewed impulse in unrenounceable fidelity to the teaching of the Church.

In the light of the truth about the gift of human life and in the light of the moral principles which flow from that truth, everyone is invited to act in the area of responsibility proper to each and, like the good Samaritan, to recognize as a neighbour even the littlest among the children of men (Cf . Lk 10: 2 9-37). Here Christ's words find a new and particular echo: "What you do to one of the least of my brethren, you do unto me" (Mt 25:40).

During an audience granted to the undersigned Prefect after the plenary session of the Congregation for the Doctrine of the Faith, the Supreme Pontiff, John Paul II, approved this Instruction and ordered it to be published.

Given at Rome, from the Congregation for the Doctrine of the Faith, February 22, 1987, the Feast of the Chair of St. Peter, the Apostle.

JOSEPH Card. RATZINGER
Prefect

ALBERTO BOVONE
Titular Archbishop of Caesarea in Numidia Secretary


(1) POPE JOHN PAUL II, Discourse to those taking part in the 81st Congress of the Italian Society of Internal Medicine and the 82nd Congress of the Italian Society of General Surgery, 27 October 1980: AAS 72 (1980) 1126.

(2) POPE PAUL VI, Discourse to the General Assembly of the United Nations Organization, 4 October 1965: AAS 57 (1965) 878; Encyclical Populorum Progressio, 13: AAS 59 (1967) 263.

(3) POPE PAUL VI, Homily during the Mass closing the Holy Year, 25 December 1975: AAS 68 (1976) 145; POPE JOHN PAUL II, Encyclical Dives in Misericordia, 30: AAS 72 (1980) 1224.

(4) POPE JOHN PAUL II, Discourse to those taking part in the 35th General Assembly of the World Medical Association, 29 October 1983: AAS 76 (1984) 390.

(5) Cf. Declaration Dignitatis Humanae, 2.

(6) Pastoral Constitution Gaudium et Spes, 22; POPE JOHN PAUL II, Encyclical Redemptor Hominis, 8: AAS 71 (1979) 270-272.

(7) Cf. Pastoral Constitution Gaudium et Spes, 35.

(8) Pastoral Constitution Gaudium et Spes, 15; cf. also POPE PAUL VI, Encyclical Populorum Progressio, 20: AAS 59 (1967) 267; POPE JOHN PAUL II, Encyclical Redemptor Hominis, 15: AAS 71 (1979) 286-289; Apostolic Exhortation Familiaris Consortio, 8: AAS 74 (1982) 89.

(9) POPE JOHN PAUL II, Apostolic Exhortation Familiaris Consortio, 11: AAS 74 (1982) 92.

(10) Cf. POPE PAUL VI, Encyclical Humanae Vitae, 10: AAS 60 (1968) 487-488.

(11) POPE JOHN PAUL II, Discourse to the members of the 35th General Assembly of the World Medical Association, 29 October 1983: AAS 76 (1984) 393.

(12) Cf. POPE JOHN PAUL II, Apostolic Exhortation Familiaris Consortio, 11: AAS 74 (1982) 91-92; cf. also Pastoral Constitution Gaudium et Spes, 50.

(13) SACRED CONGREGATION FOR THE DOCTRINE OF THE FAITH, Declaration on Procured Abortion, 9, AAS 66 (1974) 736-737.

(14) POPE JOHN PAUL II, Discourse to those taking part in the 35th General Assembly of the World Medical Association, 29 October 1983: AAS 76 (1984) 390.

(15) POPE JOHN XXIII, Encyclical Mater et Magistra, III: AAS 53 (1961) 447.

(16) Pastoral Constitution Gaudium et Spes, 24.

(17) Cf. POPE PIUS XII, Encyclical Humani Generis: AAS 42 (1950) 575; POPE PAUL VI, Professio Fidei: AAS 60 (1968) 436.

(18) POPE JOHN XXIII, Encyclical Mater et Magistra, III: AAS 53 (1961) 447; cf. POPE JOHN PAUL II, Discourse to priests participating in a seminar on "Responsible Procreation", 17 September 1983, Insegnamenti di Giovanni Paolo II, VI, 2 (1983) 562: "At the origin of each human person there is a creative act of God: no man comes into existence by chance; he is always the result of the creative love of God".

(19) Cf. Pastoral Constitution Gaudium et Spes, 24.

(20) Cf. POPE PIUS XII, Discourse to the Saint Luke Medical-Biological Union, 12 November 1944: Discorsi e Radiomessaggi VI (1944-1945) 191-192.

(21) Cf. Pastoral Constitution Gaudium et Spes, 50.

(22) Cf. Pastoral Constitution Gaudium et Spes, 51: "When it is a question of harmonizing married love with the responsible transmission of life, the moral character of one's behaviour does not depend only on the good intention and the evaluation of the motives: the objective criteria must be used, criteria drawn from the nature of the human person and human acts, criteria which respect the total meaning of mutual self-giving and human procreation in the context of true love".

(23) Pastoral Constitution Gaudium et Spes, 51.

(24) HOLY SEE, Charter of the Rights of the Family, 4: L'Osservatore Romano, 25 November 1983.

(25) SACRED CONGREGATION FOR THE DOCTRINE OF THE FAITH, Declaration on Procured Abortion, 12-13: AAS 66 (1974) 738.

(26) Cf. POPE PAUL VI, Discourse to participants in the Twenty-third National Congress of Italian Catholic Jurists, 9 December 1972: AAS 64 ( 1972) 777.

(27) The obligation to avoid disproportionate risks involves an authentic respect for human beings and the uprightness of therapeutic intentions. It implies that the doctor "above all ... must carefully evaluate the possible negative consequences which the necessary use of a particular exploratory technique may have upon the unborn child and avoid recourse to diagnostic procedures which do not offer sufficient guarantees of their honest purpose and substantial harmlessness. And if, as often happens in human choices, a degree of risk must be undertaken, he will take care to assure that it is justified by a truly urgent need for the diagnosis and by the importance of the results that can be achieved by it for the benefit of the unborn child himself" (POPE JOHN PAUL II, Discourse to Participants in the Pro-Life Movement Congress, 3 December 1982: Insegnantenti di Giovanni Paolo II, V, 3 [1982] 1512). This clarification concerning "proportionate risk" is also to be kept in mind in the following sections of the present Instruction, whenever this term appears.

(28) POPE JOHN PAUL II, Discourse to the Participants in the 35th General Assembly of the World Medical Association, 29 October 1983: AAS 76 (1984) 392.

(29) Cf. POPE JOHN PAUL II, Address to a Meeting of the Pontifical Academy of Sciences, 23 October 1982: AAS 75 (1983) 37: "I condemn, in the most explicit and formal way, experimental manipulations of the human embryo, since the human being, from conception to death, cannot be exploited for any purpose whatsoever".

(30) HOLY SEE, Charter of the Rights of the Family, 4b: L'Osservatore Romano, 25 November 1983.

(31) Cf. POPE JOHN PAUL II, Address to the Participants in the Convention of the Pro-Life Movement, 3 December 1982: Insegnamenti di Giovanni Paolo II, V, 3 (1982) 1511: "Any form of experimentation on the foetus that may damage its integrity or worsen its condition is unacceptable, except in the case of a final effort to save it from death". SACRED CONGREGATION FOR THE DOCTRINE OF THE FAITH, Declaration on Euthanasia, 4: AAS 72 (1980) 550: "In the absence of other sufficient remedies, it is permitted, with the patient's consent, to have recourse to the means provided by the most advanced medical techniques, even if these means are still at the experimental stage and are not without a certain risk".

(32) No one, before coming into existence, can claim a subjective right to begin to exist; nevertheless, it is legitimate to affirm the right of the child to have a fully human origin through conception in conformity with the personal nature of the human being. Life is a gift that must be bestowed in a manner worthy both of the subject receiving it and of the subjects transmitting it. This statement is to be borne in mind also for what will be explained concerning artificial human procreation.

(33) Cf. POPE JOHN PAUL II, Discourse to those taking part in the 35th General Assembly of the World Medical Association, 29 October 1983: AAS 76 (1984) 391.

(34) Cf. Pastoral Constitution on the Church in the Modern world, Gaudium et Spes, 50.

(35) Cf. POPE JOHN PAUL II, Apostolic Exhortation Familiaris Consortio, 14: AAS 74 ( 1982) 96.

(36) Cf. POPE PIUS XII, Discourse to those taking part in the 4th International Congress of Catholic Doctors, 29 September 1949: AAS 41 (1949) 559. According to the plan of the Creator, "A man leaves his father and his mother and cleaves to his wife, and they become one flesh" (Gen 2:24). The unity of marriage, bound to the order of creation, is a truth accessible to natural reason. The Church's Tradition and Magisterium frequently make reference to the Book of Genesis, both directly and through the passages of the New Testament that refer to it: Mt 19: 4-6; Mk: 10:5-8; Eph 5: 31. Cf. ATHENAGORAS, Legatio pro christianis, 33: PG 6, 965-967; ST CHRYSOSTOM, In Matthaeum homiliae, LXII, 19, 1: PG 58 597; ST LEO THE GREAT, Epist. ad Rusticum, 4: PL 54, 1204; INNOCENT III, Epist. Gaudemus in Domino: DS 778; COUNCIL OF LYONS II, IV Session: DS 860; COUNCIL OF TRENT, XXIV , Session: DS 1798. 1802; POPE LEO XIII, Encyclical Arcanum Divinae Sapientiae: ASS 12 (1879/80) 388-391; POPE PIUS XI, Encyclical Casti Connubii: AAS 22 (1930) 546-547; SECOND VATICAN COUNCIL, Gaudium et Spes, 48; POPE JOHN PAUL II, Apostolic Exhortation Familiaris Consortio, 19: AAS 74 (1982) 101-102; Code of Canon Law, Can.1056.

(37) Cf. POPE PIUS XII, Discourse to those taking part in the 4th International Congress of Catholic Doctors, 29 September 1949: AAS 41 (1949) 560; Discourse to those taking part in the Congress of the Italian Catholic Union of Midwives, 29 October 1951: AAS 43 (1951) 850; Code of Canon Law, Can. 1134.

(38) POPE PAUL VI, Encyclical Letter Humanae Vitae, 12: AAS 60 (1968) 488-489.

(39) Loc. cit., ibid., 489.

(40) POPE PIUS XII, Discourse to those taking part in the Second Naples World Congress on Fertility and Human Sterility, 19 May 1956: AAS 48 (1956) 470.

(41) Code of Canon Law, Can. 1061. According to this Canon, the conjugal act is that by which the marriage is consummated if the couple "have performed (it) between themselves in a human manner".

(42) Cf. Pastoral Constitution Gaudium et Spes, 14.

(43) Cf. POPE JOHN PAUL II, General Audience on 16 January 1980: Insegnamenti di Giovanni Paolo II, III, 1 (1980) 148-152.

(44) POPE JOHN PAUL II, Discourse to those taking part in the 35th General Assembly of the World Medical Association, 29 October 1983: AAS 76 (1984) 393.

(45) Cf. Pastoral Constitution Gaudium et Spes, 51.

(46) Cf. Pastoral Constitution Gaudium et Spes, 50.

(47) Cf. POPE PIUS XII, Discourse to those taking part in the 4th International Congress of Catholic Doctors, 29 September 1949: AAS 41 (1949) 560: "It would be erroneous ... to think that the possibility of resorting to this means (artificial fertilization) might render valid a marriage between persons unable to contract it because of the impedimentum impotentiae".

(48) A similar question was dealt with by POPE PAUL VI, Encyclical Humanae Vitae, 14: AAS 60 (1968) 490-491.

(49) Cf. supra: I, 1 ff.

(50) POPE JOHN PAUL II, Apostolic Exhortation Familiaris Consortio. 14: AAS 74 (1982) 96.

(51) Cf. Response of the Holy Office, 17 March 1897: DS 3323; POPE PIUS XII, Discourse to those taking part in the 4th International Congress of Catholic Doctors, 29 September 1949: AAS 41 (1949) 560; Discourse to the Italian Catholic Union of Midwives, 29 October 1951: AAS 43 (1951) 850; Discourse to those taking part in the Second Naples World Congress on Fertility and Human Sterility, 19 May 1956: AAS 48 (1956) 471-473; Discourse to those taking part in the 7th International Congress of the International Society of Haematology, 12 September 1958: AAS 50 (1958) 733; POPE JOHN XXIII, Encyclical Mater et Magistra, III: AAS 53 (1961) 447.

(52) POPE PIUS XII, Discourse to the Italian Catholic Union of Midwives, 29 October 1951: AAS 43 ( 1951 ) 850.

(53) POPE PIUS XII, Discourse to those taking part in the 4th International Congress of Catholic Doctors, 29 September 1949: AAS 41 (1949) 560.

(54) SACRED CONGREGATION FOR THE DOCTRINE OF THE FAITH, Declaration on Certain Questions Concerning Sexual ethics, 9: AAS 68 (1976) 86, which quotes the Pastoral Constitution Gaudium et Spes, 51. Cf. Decree of the Holy Office, 2 August 1929: AAS 21 (1929) 490; POPE PIUS XII, Discourse to those taking part in the 26th Congress of the Italian Society of Urology, 8 October 1953: AAS 45 (1953) 678.

(55) Cf. POPE JOHN XXIII, Encyclical Mater et Magistra, III: AAS 53 (1961) 447.

(56) Cf. POPE PIUS XII, Discourse to those taking part in the 4th International Congress of Catholic Doctors, 29 September 1949: AAS 41 (1949), 560.

(57) Cf. POPE PIUS XII, Discourse to the taking part in the Second Naples World Congress on Fertility and Human Sterility, 19 May 1956: AAS 48 (1956) 471-473.

(58) Pastoral Constitution Gaudium et Spes, 50.

(59) POPE JOHN PAUL II, Apostolic Exhortation Familiaris Consortio, 14: AAS 74 (1982) 97.

(60) Cf. Declaration Dignitatis Humanae, 7.

 

 

CONGREGATION POUR LA DOCTRINE DE LA FOI


I
NSTRUCTION

DONUM VITAE

SUR LE RESPECT DE LA VIE HUMAINE NAISSANTE
ET LA DIGNITÉ DE LA PROCRÉATION.

RÉPONSES A QUELQUES QUESTIONS D'ACTUALITÉ

 

PRELIMINAIRES

La Congrégation pour la Doctrine de la Foi a été interrogée par des Conférences Épiscopales, des Évêques, des théologiens, des médecins et hommes de science, sur la conformité avec les principes de la morale catholique des techniques biomédicales permettant d'intervenir dans la phase initiale de la vie de l'être humain et dans les processus mêmes de la procréation. La présente Instruction, fruit d'une vaste consultation, et en particulier d'une attentive évaluation des déclarations de divers épiscopats, n'entend pas rappeler tout l’enseignement de l'Église sur la dignité de la vie humaine naissante et de la procréation, mais offrir — à la lumière des précédents enseignements du Magistère — des réponses spécifiques aux principales questions soulevées à ce propos.

L'exposition est ordonnée de la manière suivante: une introduction rappellera les principes fondamentaux, de caractère anthropologique et moral, nécessaires pour une évaluation adéquate des problèmes et pour l’élaboration des réponses à ces demandes; la première partie aura pour objet le respect de l'être humain à partir du premier moment de son existence; la seconde partie affrontera les questions morales posées par les interventions de la technique sur la procréation humaine; dans la troisième partie seront présentées quelques orientations sur les rapports entre loi morale et loi civile à propos du respect dû aux embryons et fœtus humains* en relation avec la légitimité des techniques de procréation artificielle.

* Les termes de « zygote », « pré-embryon », « embryon » et « fœtus » peuvent indiquer, dans le vocabulaire de la biologie, des stades successifs du développement d'un être humain. La présente Instruction use librement de ces termes, en leur attribuant une identique importance éthique, pour désigner le fruit — visible ou non — de la génération humaine, depuis le premier moment de son existence jusqu'à sa naissance. La raison de cette utilisation ressort du texte même (cf. I, 1).

 

INTRODUCTION

1.
LA RECHERCHE BIOMEDICALE
ET L'ENSEIGNEMENT DE L'EGLISE

Le don de la vie que Dieu, Créateur et Père, a confié à l'homme, impose à celui-ci de prendre conscience de sa valeur inestimable et d'en assumer la responsabilité. Ce principe fondamental doit être placé au centre de la réflexion, pour éclairer et résoudre les problèmes moraux soulevés par les interventions artificielles sur la vie naissante et sur les processus de la procréation.

Grâce au progrès des sciences biologiques et médicales, l'homme peut disposer de ressources thérapeutiques toujours plus efficaces; mais il peut aussi acquérir des pouvoirs nouveaux, aux conséquences imprévisibles, sur la vie humaine dans son commencement même et à ses premiers stades. Divers procédés permettent maintenant d'agir non seulement pour assister, mais aussi pour dominer les processus de la procréation. Ces techniques peuvent permettre à l'homme de « prendre en main son propre destin », mais elles l'exposent aussi « à la tentation d'outrepasser les limites d'une raisonnable domination de la nature » [1]. Si elles peuvent constituer un progrès au service de l'homme, elles comportent aussi des risques graves. Aussi beaucoup lancent-ils un urgent appel pour que soient sauvegardés, dans les interventions sur la procréation, les valeurs et les droits de la personne humaine. Les demandes d'éclaircissements et d'orientations ne proviennent pas seulement des fidèles, mais aussi de ceux qui de toute façon reconnaissent à l'Église, « experte en humanité » [2], une mission au service de la « civilisation de l'amour » [3] et de la vie.

Le Magistère de l'Église n'intervient pas au nom d'une compétence particulière dans le domaine des sciences expérimentales; mais, après avoir pris connaissance des données de la recherche et de la technique, il entend proposer, en vertu de sa mission évangélique et de son devoir apostolique, la doctrine morale qui correspond à la dignité de la personne et à sa vocation intégrale, en exposant les critères de jugement moral sur les applications de la recherche scientifique et de la technique, en particulier pour tout ce qui concerne la vie humaine et ses commencements. Ces critères sont le respect, la défense et la promotion de l'homme, son « droit primaire et fondamental » à la vie [4], sa dignité de personne dotée d'une âme spirituelle, de responsabilité morale [5], et appelée à la communion bienheureuse avec Dieu.

L'intervention de l'Église, même en ce domaine, s'inspire de l'amour qu'elle doit à l'homme, en l'aidant à reconnaître et à respecter ses droits et ses devoirs. Cet amour s'alimente aux sources de la charité du Christ: en contemplant le mystère du Verbe Incarné, l'Église connaît aussi le « mystère de l'homme » [6]; en annonçant l'Évangile du salut, elle révèle à l'homme sa dignité et l'invite à découvrir pleinement sa vérité. L'Église rappelle ainsi la loi divine pour faire œuvre de vérité et de libération.

C'est en effet par bonté — pour indiquer le chemin de la vie — que Dieu donne aux hommes ses commandements et la grâce pour les observer; et c'est encore par bonté — pour les aider à persévérer dans la même voie — que Dieu offre toujours à chacun son pardon. Le Christ a compassion pour nos fragilités: Il est notre Créateur et notre Rédempteur. Que son Esprit ouvre les âmes au don de la paix de Dieu et à l'intelligence de ses préceptes!

2.
LA SCIENCE ET LA TECHNIQUE
AU SERVICE DE LA PERSONNE HUMAINE

Dieu a créé l'homme à son image et à sa ressemblance: « homme et femme il les créa » (Gen1, 27), leur confiant la tâche de « dominer la terre » (Gen 1, 28). La recherche scientifique de base comme la recherche appliquée constituent une expression significative de cette seigneurie de l'homme sur la création. La science et la technique, précieuses ressources de l'homme quand elles sont mises à son service et en promeuvent le développement intégral au bénéfice de tous, ne peuvent pas indiquer à elles seules le sens de l'existence et du progrès humain. Étant ordonnées à l'homme, dont elles tirent origine et accroissement, c'est dans la personne et ses valeurs morales qu'elles trouvent l'indication de leur finalité et la conscience de leurs limites.

Il serait donc illusoire de revendiquer la neutralité morale de la recherche scientifique et de ses applications; d'autre part, les critères d'orientation ne peuvent pas être déduits de la simple efficacité technique, de l'utilité qui peut en découler pour les uns au détriment des autres, ou pis encore, des idéologies dominantes. Aussi la science et la technique requièrent-elles, pour leur signification intrinsèque même, le respect inconditionné des critères fondamentaux de la moralité; c'est-à-dire qu'elles doivent être au service de la personne humaine, de ses droits inaliénables, de son bien véritable et intégral, conformément au projet et à la volonté de Dieu [7].

Le rapide développement des découvertes technologiques rend plus urgente cette exigence de respect des critères rappelés: la science sans conscience ne peut que conduire à la ruine de l'homme. « Notre époque, plus encore que les temps passés, a besoin de cette sagesse pour rendre plus humaines ses nouvelles découvertes. Il y a un péril effectif pour l'avenir du monde, à moins que ne surviennent des hommes plus sages » [8].

3.
ANTHROPOLOGIE ET INTERVENTIONS
DANS LE DOMAINE BIOMEDICAL

Quels critères moraux doit-on appliquer pour éclairer les problèmes posés aujourd'hui dans le cadre de la biomédecine? La réponse à cette demande suppose une juste conception de la nature de la personne humaine dans sa dimension corporelle.

En effet, c'est seulement dans la ligne de sa vraie nature que la personne humaine peut se réaliser comme une « totalité unifiée » [9]; or cette nature est en même temps corporelle et spirituelle. En raison de son union substantielle avec une âme spirituelle, le corps humain ne peut pas être considéré seulement comme un ensemble de tissus, d'organes et de fonctions; il ne peut être évalué de la même manière que le corps des animaux, mais il est partie constitutive de la personne qui se manifeste et s'exprime à travers lui.

La loi morale naturelle exprime et prescrit les finalités, les droits et les devoirs qui se fondent sur la nature corporelle et spirituelle de la personne humaine. Aussi ne peut-elle pas être conçue comme normativité simplement biologique, mais elle doit être définie comme l'ordre rationnel selon lequel l'homme est appelé par le Créateur à diriger et à régler sa vie et ses actes, et, en particulier, à user et à disposer de son propre corps [10].

Une première conséquence peut être déduite de ces principes: une intervention sur le corps humain ne touche pas seulement les tissus, les organes et leurs fonctions, mais elle engage aussi à des niveaux divers la personne même; elle comporte donc une signification et une responsabilité morales, implicitement peut-être, mais réellement. Jean-Paul II rappelait avec force à l'Association Médicale Mondiale: « Chaque personne humaine, dans sa singularité absolument unique, n'est pas constituée seulement par son esprit, mais par son corps. Ainsi, dans le corps et par le corps, on touche la personne humaine dans sa réalité concrète. Respecter la dignité de l'homme revient par conséquent à sauvegarder cette identité de l'homme corpore et anima unus, comme le dit le Concile Vatican II (const. Gaudium et Spes, n. 14, 1). C'est sur la base de cette vision anthropologique que l'on doit trouver des critères fondamentaux pour les décisions à prendre s'il s'agit d'interventions non strictement thérapeutiques, par exemple d'interventions visant à l'amélioration de la condition biologique humaine » [11].

Dans leurs applications, la biologie et la médecine concourent au bien intégral de la vie humaine lorsqu'elles viennent en aide à la personne, atteinte de maladie et d'infirmité, dans le respect de sa dignité de créature de Dieu. Nul biologiste ou médecin ne peut raisonnablement prétendre décider de l'origine et du destin des hommes au nom de sa compétence scientifique. Cette norme doit s'appliquer d'une façon particulière dans le domaine de la sexualité et de la procréation, où l'homme et la femme mettent en œuvre les valeurs fondamentales de l'amour et de la vie.

Dieu, qui est amour et vie, a inscrit dans l'homme et la femme la vocation à une participation spéciale à son mystère de communion personnelle et à son œuvre de Créateur et de Père [12]. C'est pourquoi le mariage possède des biens spécifiques et des valeurs d'union et de procréation sans commune mesure avec celles qui existent dans les formes inférieures de la vie. Ces valeurs et significations d'ordre personnel déterminent du point de vue moral le sens et les limites des interventions artificielles sur la procréation et l'origine de la vie humaine. Ces interventions ne sont pas à rejeter parce qu'artificielles. Comme telles, elles témoignent des possibilités de l'art médical. Mais elles sont à évaluer moralement par référence à la dignité de la personne humaine, appelée à réaliser la vocation divine au don de l'amour et au don de la vie.

4.
CRITERES FONDAMENTAUX POUR UN JUGEMENT MORAL

Les valeurs fondamentales relatives aux techniques de procréation artificielle humaine sont au nombre de deux: la vie de l'être humain appelé à l'existence, et l'originalité de sa transmission dans le mariage. Le jugement moral sur les méthodes de procréation artificielle devra donc être formulé en référence à ces valeurs.

La vie physique, par laquelle commence l'aventure humaine dans le monde, n'épuise assurément pas en soi toute la valeur de la personne, et ne représente pas le bien suprême de l'homme qui est appelé à l'éternité. Toutefois, elle en constitue d'une certaine manière la valeur « fondamentale », précisément parce que c'est sur la vie physique que se fondent et se développent toutes les autres valeurs de la personne [13]. L'inviolabilité du droit à la vie de l'être humain innocent « depuis le moment de la conception jusqu'à la mort » [14] est un signe et une exigence de l'inviolabilité même de la personne, à laquelle le Créateur a fait le don de la vie.

Par rapport à la transmission des autres formes de vie dans l'univers, la transmission de la vie humaine a une originalité propre, qui dérive de l'originalité même de la personne humaine. « La transmission de la vie humaine a été confiée par la nature à un acte personnel et conscient, et comme tel soumis aux très saintes lois de Dieu: ces lois inviolables et immuables doivent être reconnues et observées. C'est pourquoi on ne peut user de moyens et suivre des méthodes qui peuvent être licites dans la transmission de la vie des plantes et des animaux » [15].

Les progrès de la technique ont aujourd'hui rendu possible une procréation sans rapport sexuel, grâce à la rencontre in vitro des cellules germinales précédemment prélevées sur l'homme et la femme. Mais ce qui est techniquement possible n'est pas pour autant moralement admissible. La réflexion rationnelle sur les valeurs fondamentales de la vie et de la procréation humaine est donc indispensable pour formuler l'évaluation morale à l'égard de ces interventions de la technique sur l'être humain dès les premiers stades de son développement.

5.
ENSEIGNEMENTS DU MAGISTERE

Pour sa part, le Magistère de l'Église offre aussi en ce domaine à la raison humaine la lumière de la Révélation: la doctrine sur l'homme enseignée par le Magistère contient beaucoup d'éléments qui éclairent les problèmes ici étudiés.

Dès le moment de sa conception, la vie de tout être humain doit être absolument respectée, car l'homme est sur terre l'unique créature que Dieu a « voulue pour lui-même » [16] et l'âme spirituelle de tout homme est « immédiatement créée » par Dieu [17]; tout son être porte l'image du Créateur. La vie humaine est sacrée parce que, dès son origine, elle comporte « l'action créatrice de Dieu » [18] et demeure pour toujours dans une relation spéciale avec le Créateur, son unique fin [19]. Dieu seul est le Maître de la vie de son commencement à son terme: personne, en aucune circonstance, ne peut revendiquer pour soi le droit de détruire directement un être humain innocent [20].

La procréation humaine demande une collaboration responsable des époux avec l'amour fécond de Dieu [21]; le don de la vie humaine doit se réaliser dans le mariage moyennant les actes spécifiques et exclusifs des époux, suivant les lois inscrites dans leurs personnes et dans leur union [22].

 

I
LE RESPECT DES EMBRYONS HUMAINS

Une réflexion attentive sur cet enseignement du Magistère et sur les données rationnelles ci-dessus rappelées, permet de répondre aux multiples problèmes moraux posés par les interventions techniques sur l'être humain dans les phases initiales de sa vie, et sur les processus de sa conception.

  1. Quel respect doit-on a l'embryon humain, compte tenu de sa nature et de son identite?

L'être humain doit être respecté comme une personne dès le premier instant de son existence.

La mise en œuvre des procédés de fécondation artificielle a rendu possibles diverses interventions sur les embryons et les fœtus humains. Les buts poursuivis sont de genres divers: diagnostiques et thérapeutiques, scientifiques et commerciaux. De tout cela découlent de graves problèmes. Peut-on parler d'un droit à l'expérimentation sur les embryons humains en vue de la recherche scientifique? Quelles réglementations ou quelle législation élaborer en cette matière? La réponse à ces questions suppose une réflexion approfondie sur la nature et sur l'identité propre — on parle même de « statut » — de l'embryon humain.

Pour sa part, dans le Concile Vatican II, l'Église a proposé à nouveau à l'homme contemporain son enseignement constant et certain, selon lequel « la vie, une fois conçue, doit être protégée avec le plus grand soin; l'avortement, comme l'infanticide, sont des crimes abominables » [23]. Plus récemment, la Charte des Droits de la Famille publiée par le Saint-Siège le réaffirmait: « La vie humaine doit être respectée et protégée de manière absolue depuis le moment de la conception » [24].

Cette Congrégation connaît les discussions actuelles sur le commencement de la vie humaine, sur l'individualité de l'être humain et sur l'identité de la personne humaine. Elle rappelle les enseignements contenus dans sa Déclaration sur l’avortement provoqué: « Dès que l'ovule est fécondé, se trouve inaugurée une vie qui n'est ni celle du père ni celle de la mère, mais d'un nouvel être humain qui se développe par lui-même. Il ne sera jamais rendu humain s'il ne l'est pas dès lors. A cette évidence de toujours [...] la science génétique moderne apporte de précieuses confirmations. Elle a montré que, dès le premier instant, se trouve fixé le programme de ce que sera ce vivant: un homme, cet homme individuel avec ses notes caractéristiques déjà bien déterminées. Dès la fécondation, est commencée l'aventure d'une vie humaine dont chacune des grandes capacités demande du temps pour se mettre en place et se trouver prête à agir » [25]. Cette doctrine demeure valable, et est du reste confirmée, s'il en était besoin, par les récentes acquisitions de la biologie humaine, qui reconnaît que dans le zygote* dérivant de la fécondation s'est déjà constituée l'identité biologique d'un nouvel individu humain.

Certes, aucune donnée expérimentale ne peut être de soi suffisante pour faire reconnaître une âme spirituelle; toutefois, les conclusions scientifiques sur l'embryon humain fournissent une indication précieuse pour discerner rationnellement une présence personnelle dès cette première apparition d'une vie humaine: comment un individu humain ne serait-il pas une personne humaine? Le Magistère ne s'est pas expressément engagé sur une affirmation de nature philosophique, mais il réaffirme d'une manière constante la condamnation morale de tout avortement provoqué. Cet enseignement n'est pas changé, et il demeure inchangeable [26].

C'est pourquoi le fruit de la génération humaine dès le premier instant de son existence, c'est-à-dire à partir de la constitution du zygote, exige le respect inconditionnel moralement dû à l'être humain dans sa totalité corporelle et spirituelle. L'être humain doit être respecté et traité comme une personne dès sa conception, et donc dès ce moment on doit lui reconnaître les droits de la personne, parmi lesquels en premier lieu le droit inviolable de tout être humain innocent à la vie.

Ce rappel doctrinal offre le critère fondamental pour la solution des divers problèmes posés par le développement des sciences biomédicales en ce domaine: puisqu'il doit être traité comme une personne, l'embryon devra aussi être défendu dans son intégrité, soigné et guéri, dans la mesure du possible, comme tout autre être humain dans le cadre de l'assistance médicale.

* Le zygote est la cellule dérivant de la fusion des noyaux de deux gamètes.

  1. Le diagnostic prénatal est-il moralement licite?

Si le diagnostic prénatal respecte la vie et l'intégrité de l'embryon et du foetus humain, et s'il est orienté à sa sauvegarde ou à sa guérison individuelle, la réponse est affirmative.

Le diagnostic prénatal peut en effet faire connaître les conditions de l'embryon et du foetus quand il est encore dans le sein de sa mère; il permet ou laisse prévoir certaines interventions thérapeutiques, médicales ou chirurgicales, d'une manière plus précoce et plus efficace.

Ce diagnostic est licite si les méthodes utilisées, avec le consentement des parents convenablement informés, sauvegardent la vie et l'intégrité de l'embryon et de sa mère, sans leur faire courir de risques disproportionnés [27]. Mais il est gravement en opposition avec la loi morale quand il prévoit, en fonction des résultats, l'éventualité de provoquer un avortement: un diagnostic attestant l'existence d'une malformation ou d'une maladie héréditaire ne doit pas être l'équivalent d'une sentence de mort. Aussi, la femme qui demanderait ce diagnostic avec l'intention bien arrêtée de procéder à l'avortement au cas où le résultat confirmerait l'existence d'une malformation ou d'une anomalie, commettrait-elle une action gravement illicite. De même agiraient contrairement à la morale le conjoint, les parents ou toute autre personne, s'ils conseillaient ou imposaient le diagnostic à la femme enceinte dans la même intention d'en venir éventuellement à l'avortement. Ainsi également serait responsable d'une collaboration illicite le spécialiste qui, dans sa manière de poser le diagnostic et d'en communiquer les résultats, contribuerait volontairement à établir ou à favoriser le lien entre diagnostic prénatal et avortement.

On doit enfin condamner, comme une violation du droit à la vie de l'enfant à naître et comme une atteinte grave aux droits et devoirs prioritaires des époux, toute directive ou programme émanant des autorités civiles, sanitaires, ou d'organismes scientifiques, qui favoriserait en quelque manière la connexion entre diagnostic prénatal et avortement, ou qui inciterait les femmes enceintes à se soumettre à un diagnostic prénatal planifié dans le but d'éliminer les fœtus déjà atteints ou porteurs de malformations ou de maladies héréditaires.

  1. Les interventions thérapeutiques sur l'embryon humain sont-elles licites?

Comme pour toute intervention médicale sur des patients, on doit considérer comme licites les interventions sur l'embryon humain, à condition qu'elles respectent la vie et l'intégrité de l'embryon et qu'elles ne comportent pas pour lui de risques disproportionnés, mais qu'elles visent à sa guérison, à l'amélioration de ses condition de santé, ou à sa survie individuelle.

Quel que soit le genre de thérapie médicale, chirurgicale ou d'un autre type, le consentement libre et informé des parents est requis, selon les règles déontologiques prévues dans le cas des enfants. S'agissant d'une vie embryonnaire ou de fœtus, l'application de ce principe moral peut demander des précautions délicates et particulières.

La légitimité et les critères de ces interventions ont été clairement exprimées par Jean-Paul II: « Une intervention strictement thérapeutique qui se fixe comme objectif la guérison de diverses maladies, comme celles dues à des déficiences chromosomiques, sera, en principe, considérée comme souhaitable, pourvu qu'elle tende à la vraie promotion du bien-être personnel de l'homme, sans porter atteinte à son intégrité ou détériorer ses conditions de vie. Une telle intervention se situe en effet dans la logique de la tradition morale chrétienne » [28].

  1. Comment apprécier moralement la recherche et l'expérimentation* sur les embryons et sur les fœtus humains ?

La recherche médicale doit s'abstenir d'interventions sur les embryons vivants, à moins qu'il n'y ait certitude morale de ne causer de dommage ni à la vie ni à l'intégrité de l'enfant à naître et de sa mère, et à condition que les parents aient donné pour l'intervention sur l'embryon leur consentement libre et informé. Il s'ensuit que toute recherche, même limitée à une simple observation de l'embryon, deviendrait illicite dès lors que, à cause des méthodes utilisées ou des effets provoqués, elle impliquerait un risque pour l'intégrité physique ou la vie de l'embryon.

En ce qui concerne l'expérimentation — présupposée la dis­tinction générale entre celle qui a une finalité non directement thérapeutique et celle qui est clairement thérapeutique pour le sujet lui-même —, il faut encore distinguer entre l'expérimentation effectuée sur des embryons encore vivants et l'expérimentation effectuée sur des embryons morts. S'ils sont encore vivants, viables ou non, ils doivent être respectés comme toutes les personnes humaines; l’expérimentation non directement thérapeutique sur les embryons est illicite [29].

Aucune finalité, même noble en soi comme la prévision d'une utilité pour la science, pour d'autres êtres humains ou pour la société, ne peut en quelque manière justifier l'expérimentation sur des embryons ou des fœtus humains vivants, viables ou non, dans le sein maternel ou en dehors de lui. Le consentement informé, normalement requis pour l'expérimentation clinique sur l'adulte, ne peut être concédé par les parents, qui ne peuvent disposer ni de l'intégrité physique ni de la vie de l'enfant à naître. D'autre part, l'expérimentation sur les embryons ou fœtus comporte toujours le risque — et même souvent la prévision certaine — d'un dommage pour leur intégrité physique ou de leur mort.

L'utilisation de l'embryon humain ou d'un fœtus comme objet ou instrument d'expérimentation représente un délit à l'égard de leur dignité d'êtres humains ayant droit au même respect que l'enfant déjà né et toute personne humaine. La Charte des Droits de la Famille publiée par le Saint-Siège déclare: « Le respect pour la dignité de l'être humain exclut toute espèce de manipulation expérimentale ou exploitation de l'embryon humain » [30]. La pratique de maintenir en vie des embryons humains, in vivo ou in vitro, à des fins expérimentales ou commerciales est absolument contraire à la dignité humaine.

Dans le cas de l'expérimentation clairement thérapeutique, c'est-à-dire s'il s'agissait de thérapies expérimentales utilisées au bénéfice de l'embryon lui-même comme une tentative extrême pour lui sauver la vie, et faute d'autres thérapies valables, le recours à des remèdes ou à des procédés pas encore entièrement éprouvés peut être licite [31].

Les cadavres d'embryons ou fœtus humains, volontairement avortés ou non, doivent être respectés comme les dépouilles des autres êtres humains. En particulier, ils ne peuvent faire l'objet de mutilations ou autopsies si leur mort n'a pas été constatée, et sans le consentement des parents ou de la mère. De plus, il faut que soit sauvegardée l'exigence morale excluant toute complicité avec l'avortement volontaire, de même que tout danger de scandale. Dans le cas des fœtus morts, comme pour les cadavres de personnes adultes, toute pratique commerciale doit être considérée comme illicite et doit être interdite.

* Comme les termes « recherche » et « expérimentation » sont fréquemment utilisés d'une manière équivalente et ambiguë, il convient de préciser le sens qui leur est attribué dans le présent document.

1) Par recherche, on entend tout procédé inductif-déductif visant à promouvoir l'observation systématique d'un phénomène donné dans le champ humain, ou à vérifier une hypothèse découlant de précédentes observations.

2) Par expérimentation, on entend toute recherche dans laquelle l'être humain (aux divers stades de son existence: embryon, fœtus, enfant ou adulte) représente l'objet grâce auquel ou sur lequel on entend vérifier l'effet — à ce moment inconnu ou encore mal connu — d'un traitement donné (par exemple pharmaceutique, tératogène, chirurgical, etc.).

  1. Comment apprécier moralement l'usage, a des fins de re­cherche, des embryons obtenus pàr la fécondation « in vitro »?

Les embryons humains obtenus in vitro sont des êtres humains et des sujets de droits. Leur dignité et leur droit à la vie doivent être respectés dès le premier moment de leur existence. Il est immoral de produire des embryons humains destinés à être exploités comme un « matériau biologique » disponible.

Dans la pratique habituelle de la fécondation in vitro, tous les embryons ne sont pas transférés dans le corps de la femme; certains sont détruits. Aussi, comme elle condamne l'avortement provoqué, l'Église interdit également d'attenter à la vie de ces êtres humains. Il faut dénoncer la particulière gravité de la destruction volontaire des embryons humains obtenus « in vitro » par fécondation artificielle ou « fission gémellaire » à de seule fins de recherche. En agissant ainsi, le chercheur se substitue à Dieu et, même s'il n'en a pas conscience, se fait maître du destin d'autrui, puisqu'il choisit arbitrairement qui faire vivre et qui faire mourir, et qu'il supprime des êtres humains sans défense.

Les procédures d'observation ou d'expérimentation qui causent un dommage ou imposent des risques graves et disproportionnés aux embryons obtenus in vitro sont, pour les mêmes raisons, moralement illicites. Tout être humain est à respecter pour lui-même; il ne peut être purement et simplement réduit à sa valeur d'usage au bénéfice d'autrui.

Il n'est donc pas conforme à la moralité d'exposer délibérément à la mort des embryons humains obtenus « in vitro ». Par le fait qu'ils ont été produits in vitro, ces embryons non transférés dans le corps de la mère, et qualifiés de « surnuméraires », demeurent exposés à un sort absurde, sans qu'il soit possible de leur donner des voies de survie certaines et licitement réalisables.

  1. Quel jugement porter sur les autres procèdes de manipulation des embryons lies aux « techniques de reproduction humaine »?

Les techniques de fécondation in vitro peuvent rendre possibles d'autres formes de manipulation biologique ou génétique des embryons humains telles que: les tentatives ou projets de fécondation entre gamètes humains et animaux, et de gestation d'embryons humains dans des utérus d'animaux; l'hypothèse ou le projet de construction d'utérus artificiels pour l'embryon humain. Ces procédés sont contraires à la dignité d'être humain qui appartient à l'embryon, et en même temps, ils lèsent le droit de toute personne à être conçue et à naître dans le mariage et du mariage [32]. Même les tentatives ou les hypothèses faites pour obtenir un être humain sans aucune connexion avec la sexualité, par « fission gémellaire », clonage, parthénogenèse, sont à considérer comme contraires à la morale, car elles sont en opposition avec la dignité tant de la procréation humaine que de l'union conjugale.

La congélation des embryons, même si elle est réalisée pour garantir une conservation de l'embryon en vie (« cryoconservation »), constitue une offense au respect dû aux êtres humains, car elle les expose à de graves risques de mort ou d'atteinte à leur intégrité physique; elle les prive au moins temporairement de l'accueil et de la gestation maternelle, et les place dans une situation susceptible d'offenses et de manipulations ultérieures.

Certaines tentatives d'intervention sur le patrimoine chromosomique ou génétique ne sont pas thérapeutiques, mais tendent à la production d'êtres humains sélectionnés selon le sexe ou d'autres qualités préétablies. Ces manipulations sont contraires à la dignité personnelle de l'être humain, à son intégrité et à son identité. Elles ne peuvent donc en aucune manière être justifiées par d'éventuelles conséquences bénéfiques pour l'humanité future [33]. Toute personne doit être respectée pour elle-même: en cela consiste la dignité et le droit de tout être humain depuis son origine.

II

INTERVENTIONS SUR LA PROCRÉATION HUMAINE

Par « procréation artificielle » ou « fécondation artificielle », on entend ici les diverses procédures techniques destinées à obtenir une conception humaine d'une manière autre que par l'union sexuelle de l'homme et de la femme. L'Instruction traite de la fécondation d'un ovule en éprouvette (fécondation in vitro) et de l'insémination artificielle moyennant transfert, dans les organes génitaux de la femme, du sperme précédemment recueilli.

Un point préliminaire à l'appréciation morale de ces techniques est constitué par la considération des circonstances et des conséquences qu'elles comportent par rapport au respect dû à l'embryon humain. L'extension de la pratique de la fécondation in vitro a nécessité d'innombrables fécondations et destructions d'embryons humains. Aujourd'hui encore, elle présuppose habituellement une surovulation de la femme: plusieurs ovules sont prélevés, fécondés et cultivés ensuite in vitro pendant quelques jours. Habituellement, tous ne sont pas transférés dans les organes génitaux de la femme; certains embryons, appelés ordinairement « surnuméraires », sont détruits ou congelés. Parmi les embryons implantés, certains sont sacrifiés pour diverses raisons eugéniques, économiques ou psychologiques. Cette destruction volontaire d'être humains ou leur utilisation à diverses fins, au détriment de leur intégrité et de leur vie, est contraire à la doctrine déjà rappelée à propos de l'avortement provoqué.

Le rapport entre fécondation in vitro et élimination volontaire d'embryons humains se vérifie trop fréquemment. Ceci est significatif: avec ces procédés, aux finalités apparemment opposées, la vie et la mort sont soumises aux décisions de l'homme, qui en vient ainsi à se constituer donateur de vie et de mort sur commande. Cette dynamique de violence et de domination peut n'être pas perçue par eux-mêmes qui, en voulant l'utiliser, s'y assujettissent. Les données de fait rappelées et la froide logique qui les relie doivent être prises en considération pour un jugement moral sur la FIVETE (fécondation in vitro et transfert de l'embryon): la mentalité abortive qui l'a rendue possible conduit ainsi, qu'on le veuille ou non, à une domination de l'homme sur la vie et sur la mort de ses semblables, qui peut conduire à un eugénisme radical.

Des abus de ce genre ne dispensent cependant pas d'une réflexion éthique ultérieure et approfondie sur les techniques de procréation artificielle considérées en elles-mêmes, abstraction faite autant que possible de la destruction des embryons produits in vitro.

La présente Instruction prendra donc en considération tout d'abord les problèmes posés par la fécondation artificielle hétérologue (II, 1-3),* puis ceux qui sont liés à la fécondation artificielle homologue (II, 4-6).**

Avant de formuler un jugement éthique sur chacune d'elles, on exposera les principes et les valeurs qui déterminent l'appréciation morale de chacune de ces procédures.

* L'Instruction entend, sous la dénomination de Fécondation ou procréation artificielle hétérologue, les techniques destinée à obtenir artificiellement une conception humaine à partir de gamètes provenant d'au moins un donneur autre que les époux qui sont unis en mariage. Ces techniques peuvent être de deux types:

  1. a) FIVETE hétérologue: technique destinée à obtenir une conception humaine par la rencontre in vitro de gamètes prélevés sur au moins un donneur autre que les époux unis par le mariage.
  2. b) Insémination artificielle hétérologue: technique destinée à obtenir une conception humaine par le transfert dans les organes génitaux de la femme du sperme précédemment recueilli sur un donneur autre que le mari.

** L'Instruction entend par Fécondation ou procréation artificielle homologue la technique destinée à obtenir une conception humaine à partir des gamètes de deux époux unis en mariage. La fécondation artificielle homologue peut être réalisée par deux méthodes diverses:

  1. a) FIVETE homologue: technique destinée à obtenir une conception humaine par la rencontre in vitro des gamètes des époux unis en mariage.
  2. b) Insémination artificielle homologue: technique destinée à obtenir une conception humaine par le transfert dans les organes génitaux d'une femme mariée du sperme de son mari précédemment recueilli.

A
FÉCONDATION ARTIFICIELLE HÉTÉROLOGUE

  1. Pourquoi la procréation humaine doit-elle avoir lieu dans le mariage?

Tout être humain doit être accueilli comme un don et une bénédiction de Dieu. Cependant, du point de vue moral, une procréation vraiment responsable à l’égard de l’enfant à naître doit être le fruit du mariage.

La procréation humaine possède en effet des caractéristiques spécifiques en vertu de la dignité personnelle des parents et des enfants: la procréation d'une personne nouvelle, par laquelle l'homme et la femme collaborent avec la puissance du Créateur, devra être le fruit et le signe de la donation mutuelle et personnelle des époux, de leur amour et de leur fidélité [34]. La fidélité des époux, dans l'unité du mariage, comporte le respect réciproque de leur droit à devenir père et mère seulement l'un par l'autre.

L'enfant a droit d'être conçu, porté, mis au monde et éduqué dans le mariage: c'est par la référence assurée et reconnue à ses parents qu'il peut découvrir son identité et mûrir sa propre formation humaine.

Les parents trouvent dans l'enfant une confirmation et un accomplissement de leur donation réciproque: il est l'image vivante de leur amour, le signe permanent de leur union conjugale, la synthèse vivante et indissoluble de leur dimension paternelle et maternelle [35].

En vertu de la vocation et des responsabilités sociales de la personne, le bien des enfants et des parents contribue au bien de la société civile; la vitalité et l'équilibre de la société demandent que les enfants viennent au monde au sein d'une famille, et que celle-ci soit fondée sur le mariage d'une manière stable.

La tradition de l'Église et la réflexion anthropologique reconnaissent dans le mariage et dans son unité indissoluble le seul lieu digne d'une procréation vraiment responsable.

  1. La fécondation artificielle hétérologue est-elle conforme a la dignité des époux et a la vérité du mariage ?

Dans la FIVETE et l'insémination artificielle hétérologue, la conception humaine est obtenue par la rencontre des gamètes d'au moins un donneur autre que les époux unis dans le mariage. La fécondation artificielle hétérologue est contraire à l'unité du mariage, à la dignité des époux, à la vocation propre des parents et au droit de l'enfant à être conçu et mis au monde dans le mariage et par le mariage [36].

Le respect de l'unité du mariage et de la fidélité conjugale exige que l'enfant soit conçu dans le mariage; le lien entre les conjoints attribue aux époux, de manière objective et inaliénable, le droit exclusif à ne devenir père et mère que l'un par l'autre [37]. Le recours aux gamètes d'une tierce personne, pour disposer du sperme ou de l'ovule, constitue une violation de l'engagement réciproque des époux et un manquement grave à l'unité, propriété essentielle du mariage.

La fécondation artificielle hétérologue lèse les droits de l'enfant, le prive de la relation filiale à ses origines parentales, et peut faire obstacle à la maturation de son identité personnelle. Elle constitue en outre une offense à la vocation commune des époux appelés à la paternité et à la maternité; elle prive objectivement la fécondité conjugale de son unité et de son intégrité; elle opère et manifeste une rupture entre parenté génétique, parenté « gestationnelle » et responsabilité éducative. Cette altération des relations personnelles à l'intérieur de la famille se répercute dans la société civile: ce qui menace l'unité et la stabilité de la famille est source de dissensions, de désordre et d'injustices dans toute la vie sociale.

Ces raisons conduisent à un jugement moral négatif sur la fécondation artificielle hétérologue: sont donc moralement illicites la fécondation d'une femme mariée par le sperme d'un donneur autre que son mari, et la fécondation par le sperme du mari d'un ovule qui ne provient pas de son épouse. En outre, la fécondation artificielle d'une femme non mariée, célibataire ou veuve, quel que soit le donneur, ne peut être moralement justifiée.

Le désir d'avoir un enfant, l'amour entre les époux qui souhaitent remédier à une stérilité autrement insurmontable, constituent des motivations compréhensibles; mais les intentions subjectivement bonnes ne rendent la fécondation artificielle hétérologue ni conforme aux propriétés objectives et inaliénables du mariage, ni respectueuse des droits de l'enfant et des époux.

  1. La maternité « de substitution »* est-elle moralement licite ?

Non, pour les mêmes raisons qui conduisent à refuser la fécondation artificielle hétérologue: elle est en effet contraire à l'unité du mariage et à la dignité de la procréation de la personne humaine.

La maternité de substitution représente un manquement objectif aux obligations de l'amour maternel, de la fidélité conjugale et de la maternité responsable; elle offense la dignité de l'enfant et son droit à être conçu, porté, mis au monde et éduqué par ses propres parents; elle instaure, au détriment des familles, une division entre les éléments physiques, psychiques et moraux qui les constituent.

* Sous l'appellation de « mère substitutive », l'Instruction entend désigner:

  1. a) la femme qui porte un embryon implanté dans son utérus, mais qui lui est génétiquement étranger, parce qu'obtenu par l'union des gamètes de « donneurs », — avec l'engagement de remettre l'enfant une fois né à la personne ayant commissionné ou stipulé cette gestation;
  2. b) la femme qui porte un embryon à la procréation duquel elle a contribué par le don d'un ovule, fécondé par insémination artificielle avec le sperme d'un homme autre que son mari, — avec l'engagement de remettre l'enfant une fois né à la personne ayant commissionné ou stipulé cette gestation.

B
FÉCONDATION ARTIFICIELLE HOMOLOGUE

Une fois déclarée inacceptable la fécondation artificielle hétérologue, on doit se demander comment apprécier moralement les procédés de fécondation artificielle homologue: FIVETE et insémination artificielle entre époux. Il convient auparavant d'éclaircir une question de principe.

  1. Quel lien est moralement requis entre procréation et acte conjugal?
  2. a) L'enseignement de l'Église sur le mariage et la procréation humaine affirme « le lien indissoluble que Dieu a voulu, et que l'homme ne peut rompre de sa propre initiative, entre les deux significations de l'acte conjugal: union et procréation. En fait, par sa structure intime, l'acte conjugal, unissant les époux par un lien très profond, les rend aptes à la génération de nouvelles vies, selon les lois inscrites dans l'être même de l'homme et de la femme » [38]. Ce principe, fondé sur la nature du mariage et la connexion intime de ses biens, entraîne des conséquences bien connues sur le plan de la paternité et de la maternité responsables: « C'est en sauvegardant les deux aspects essentiels, union et procréation, que l'acte conjugal conserve intégralement le sens d'amour mutuel et véritable, et son ordination à la très haute vocation de l'homme à la paternité » [39].

La même doctrine relative au lien entre les significations de l'acte conjugal et les biens du mariage éclaire le problème moral de la fécondation artificielle homologue, car « il n'est jamais permis de séparer ces divers aspects au point d'exclure positivement soit l'intention procréatrice, soit le rapport conjugal » [40].

La contraception, prive intentionnellement l'acte conjugal de son ouverture à la procréation, et opère par là une dissociation volontaire des finalités du mariage. La fécondation artificielle homologue, en recherchant une procréation qui n'est pas le fruit d'un acte spécifique de l'union conjugale, opère objectivement une séparation analogue entre les biens et les significations du mariage.

C'est pourquoi la fécondation est licitement voulue quand elle est le terme d'un « acte conjugal apte de soi à la génération, auquel le mariage est destiné par sa nature et par lequel les époux deviennent une seule chair » [41]. Mais la procréation est moralement privée de sa perfection propre quand elle n'est pas voulue comme le fruit de l'acte conjugal, c'est-à-dire du geste spécifique de l'union des époux.

  1. b) La valeur morale du lien intime entre les biens du mariage et les significations de l'acte conjugal se fonde sur l'unité de l'être humain, corps et âme spirituelle [42]. Les époux s'expriment réciproquement leur amour personnel dans le « langage du corps », qui comporte clairement des « significations sponsales » en même temps que parentales [43]. L'acte conjugal, par lequel les époux se manifestent réciproquement leur don mutuel, exprime aussi l'ouverture au don de la vie: il est un acte inséparablement corporel et spirituel. C'est dans leur corps et par leur corps que les époux consomment leur mariage et peuvent devenir père et mère. Pour respecter le langage des corps et leur générosité naturelle, l'union conjugale doit s'accomplir dans le respect de l'ouverture à la procréation, et la procréation d'une personne humaine doit être le fruit et le terme de l'amour des époux. L'origine de l'être humain résulte ainsi d'une procréation « liée à l'union non seulement biologique mais aussi spirituelle des parents unis par le lien du mariage » [44]. Une fécondation obtenue en dehors du corps des époux demeure par là même privée des significations et des valeurs qui s'expriment dans le langage du corps et l'union des personnes humaines.
  2. c) Seul le respect du lien qui existe entre les significations de l'acte conjugal et le respect de l'unité de l'être humain permet une procréation conforme à la dignité de la personne. Dans son origine unique, non réitérable, l'enfant devra être respecté et reconnu égal en dignité personnelle à ceux qui lui donnent la vie. La personne humaine doit être accueillie dans le geste d'union et d'amour de ses parents; la génération d'un enfant devra donc être le fruit de la donation réciproque [45] qui se réalise dans l'acte conjugal où les époux coopèrent, comme des serviteurs et non comme des maîtres, à l'œuvre de l'Amour Créateur [46].

L'origine d'une personne est en réalité le résultat d'une donation. L'enfant à naître devra être le fruit de l'amour de ses parents. Il ne peut être ni voulu ni conçu comme le produit d'une intervention de techniques médicales et biologiques; cela reviendrait à le réduire à devenir l'objet d'une technologie scientifique. Nul ne peut soumettre la venue au monde d'un enfant à des conditions d'efficacité technique mesurées selon des paramètres de contrôle et de domination.

L'importance morale du lien entre les significations de l'acte conjugal et les biens du mariage, l'unité d,e l'être humain et la dignité de son origine, exigent que la procréation d'une personne humaine doive être poursuivie comme le fruit de l'acte conjugal spécifique de l'amour des époux. Le lien existant entre procréation et acte conjugal se révèle donc d'une grande portée sur le plan anthropologique et moral, et il éclaire les positions du Magistère à propos de la fécondation artificielle homologue.

  1. La fécondation homologue « in vitro » est-elle moralement licite ?

La réponse à cette question est strictement dépendante des principes qui viennent d'être rappelés. Assurément, on ne peut pas ignorer les légitimes aspirations des époux stériles; pour certains, le recours à la FIVETE homologue semble l'unique moyen d'obtenir un enfant sincèrement désiré: on se demande si dans ces situations, la globalité de la vie conjugale ne suffit pas à assurer la dignité qui convient à la procréation humaine. On reconnaît que la FIVETE ne peut certainement pas suppléer à l'absence des rapports conjugaux [47] et ne peut pas être préférée, vu les risques qui peuvent se produire pour l'enfant et les désagréments de la procédure, aux actes spécifiques de l'union conjugale. Mais on se demande également si, dans l'impossibilité de remédier autrement à la stérilité, cause de souffrance, la fécondation homologue in vitro ne peut pas constituer une aide, sinon même une thérapie, dont la licéité morale pourrait être admise.

Le désir d'un enfant — ou du moins la disponibilité à transmettre la vie — est une requête moralement nécessaire à une procréation humaine responsable. Mais cette intention bonne ne suffit pas pour donner une appréciation morale positive sur la fécondation in vitro entre époux. Le procédé de la FIVETE doit être jugé en lui-même, et ne peut emprunter sa qualification morale définitive ni à l'ensemble de la vie conjugale dans laquelle il s'inscrit, ni aux actes conjugaux qui peuvent le précéder ou le suivre [48].

On a déjà rappelé que dans les circonstances où elle est habituellement pratiquée, la FIVETE implique la destruction d'être humains, fait contraire à la doctrine citée plus haut sur l'illicéité de l'avortement [49]. Pourtant, même dans le cas où toute précaution serait prise pour éviter la mort d'embryons humains, la FIVETE homologue réalise la dissociation des gestes qui sont destinés à la fécondation humaine par l'acte conjugal. La nature propre de la FIVETE homologue devra donc aussi être considérée, abstraction faite du lien avec l'avortement provoqué.

La FIVETE homologue est opérée en dehors du corps des conjoints, par des gestes de tierces personnes dont la compétence et l'activité technique déterminent le succès de l'intervention; elle remet la vie et l'identité de l'embryon au pouvoir des médecins et des biologistes, et instaure une domination de la technique sur l'origine et la destinée de la personne humaine. Une telle relation de domination est de soi contraire à la dignité et à l'égalité qui doivent être communes aux parents et aux enfants.

La conception in vitro est le résultat de l'action technique qui préside à la fécondation; elle n'est ni effectivement obtenue, ni positivement voulue, comme l’expression et le fruit d'un acte spécifique de l'union conjugale. Donc dans la FIVETE homologue, même considérée dans le contexte de rapports conjugaux effectifs, la génération de la personne humaine est objectivement privée de sa perfection propre: celle d'être le terme et le fruit d'un acte conjugal, dans lequel les époux peuvent devenir « coopérateurs de Dieu pour le don de la vie à une autre nouvelle personne » [50].

Ces raisons permettent de comprendre pourquoi l'acte de l'amour conjugal est considéré dans l'enseignement de l'Église comme l'unique lieu digne de la procréation humaine. Pour les mêmes raisons, le « simple case », c'est-à-dire une procédure de FIVETE homologue purifiée de toute compromission avec la pratique abortive de la destruction d'embryons et avec la masturbation, demeure une technique moralement illicite, parce qu'elle prive la procréation humaine de la dignité qui lui est propre et connaturelle.

Certes, la FIVETE homologue n'est pas affectée de toute la négativité éthique qui se rencontre dans la procréation extra-conjugale; la famille et le mariage continuent à constituer le cadre de la naissance et de l'éducation des enfants. Cependant, en conformité avec la doctrine traditionnelle sur les biens du mariage et la dignité de la personne, l'Église demeure contraire, du point de vue moral, à la fécondation homologue in vitro; celle-ci est en elle-même illicite et opposée à la dignité de la procréation et de l'union conjugale, même quand tout est mis en œuvre pour éviter la mort de l'embryon humain.

Bien qu'on ne puisse pas approuver la modalité par laquelle est obtenue la conception humaine dans la FIVETE, tout enfant qui vient au monde devra cependant être accueilli comme un don vivant de la Bonté divine et être éduqué avec amour.

  1. Comment apprécier moralement l'insémination artificielle homologue?

L'insémination artificielle homologue à l'intérieur du mariage ne peut être admise, sauf dans le cas ou le moyen technique ne se substitue pas à l'acte conjugal, mais apparaît comme une facilité et une aide pour que celui-ci rejoigne sa fin naturelle.

L'enseignement du Magistère à ce sujet a déjà été explicité [51]: il n'est pas seulement expression de circonstances historiques particulières, mais se fonde sur la doctrine de l'Église au sujet du lien entre union conjugale et procréation, et sur la considération de la nature personnelle de l'acte conjugal et de la procréation humaine. « L'acte conjugal dans sa structure naturelle est une action personnelle, une coopération simultanée et immédiate des époux, laquelle, du fait même de la nature des agents et du caractère de l'acte, est l'expression du don réciproque qui, selon la parole de l'Écriture, réalise l'union en une seule chair » [52]. Pour autant, la conscience morale « ne proscrit pas nécessairement l'emploi de certains moyens artificiels destinés uniquement soit à faciliter l'acte naturel, soit à faire atteindre sa fin à l'acte naturel normalement accompli » [53]. Si le moyen technique facilite l'acte conjugal ou l'aide à atteindre ses objectifs naturels, il peut être moralement admis. Quand, au contraire, l'intervention se substitue à l'acte conjugal, elle est moralement illicite.

L'insémination artificielle substituant l'acte conjugal est proscrite en vertu de la dissociation volontairement opérée entre les deux significations de l'acte conjugal. La masturbation, par laquelle on se procure habituellement le sperme, est un autre signe de cette dissociation: même quand il est posé en vue de la procréation, le geste demeure privé de sa signification unitive. « Il lui manque [...] la relation sexuelle requise par l'ordre moral, celle qui réalise, "dans le contexte d'un amour vrai, le sens intégral de la donation mutuelle et de la procréation humaine" » [54].

  1. Quel critère moral proposer quant a l'intervention du médecin dans la procréation humaine ?

L'acte médical ne doit pas être apprécié seulement par rapport à sa seule dimension technique, mais aussi et surtout en relation à sa finalité, qui est le bien des personnes et leur santé corporelle et psychique. Les critères moraux pour l'intervention médicale dans la procréation se déduisent de la dignité des personnes humaines, de leur sexualité et de leur origine.

La médecine, qui se veut ordonnée au bien intégral de la personne, doit respecter les valeurs spécifiquement humaines de la sexualité [55]. Le médecin est au service des personnes et de la procréation humaine: il n'a pas le pouvoir de disposer d'elles ni de décider à leur sujet. L'intervention médicale est respectueuse de la dignité des personnes quand elle vise à aider l'acte conjugal, soit pour en faciliter l'accomplissement, soit pour lui permettre d'atteindre sa fin, une fois qu'il a été normalement accompli [56].

Au contraire, il arrive parfois que l'intervention médicale se substitue techniquement à l'acte conjugal pour obtenir une procréation qui n'est ni son résultat ni son fruit: dans ce cas, l'acte médical n'est pas, comme il le devrait, au service de l'union conjugale, mais il s'en attribue la fonction procréatrice et ainsi contredit la dignité et les droits inaliénables des époux et de l'enfant à naître.

L'humanisation de la médecine, qui est de nos jours instamment réclamée par tous, exige le respect de la dignité intégrale de la personne humaine, en premier lieu dans l'acte et au moment où les époux transmettent la vie à une personne nouvelle. Il est donc logique d'adresser aussi une pressante demande aux médecins et aux chercheurs catholiques, pour qu'ils témoignent exemplairement du respect dû à l'embryon humain et à la dignité de la procréation. Le personnel médical et soignant des hôpitaux et des cliniques catholiques est invité d'une manière spéciale à honorer les obligations morales contractées, souvent même à titre statutaire. Les responsables de ces hôpitaux et cliniques catholiques, qui sont souvent des religieux, auront à cœur d'assurer et de promouvoir l'observation attentive des normes morales rappelées dans la présente Instruction.

  1. La souffrance provenant de la stérilité conjugale.

La souffrance des époux qui ne peuvent avoir d'enfants ou qui craignent de mettre au monde un enfant handicapé est une souffrance que tous doivent comprendre et apprécier comme il convient.

De la part des époux, le désir d'un enfant est naturel: il exprime la vocation à la paternité et à la maternité inscrite dans l'amour conjugal. Ce désir peut être plus vif encore si le couple est frappé d'une stérilité qui semble incurable. Cependant, le mariage ne confère pas aux époux un droit à avoir un enfant, mais seulement le droit de poser les actes naturels ordonnés de soi à la procréation [57].

Un droit véritable et strict à l'enfant serait contraire à sa dignité et à sa nature. L’enfant n'est un dû et il ne peut être considéré comme objet de propriété: il est plutôt un don — « le plus grand » [58] — et le plus gratuit du mariage, témoignage vivant de la donation réciproque de ses parents. A ce titre, l'enfant a le droit comme on l'a rappelé d'être le fruit de l'acte spécifique de l'amour conjugal de ses parents, et aussi le droit d'être respecté comme personne dès le moment de sa conception.

Toutefois la stérilité, quelles qu'en soient la cause et le pronostic, est certainement une dure épreuve. La communauté des croyants est appelée à éclairer et à soutenir la souffrance de ceux qui ne peuvent réaliser une légitime aspiration à la paternité et à la maternité. Les époux qui se trouvent dans ces situations douloureuses sont appelés à y découvrir l'occasion d'une participation particulière à la Croix du Seigneur, source de fécondité spirituelle. Les couples stériles ne doivent pas oublier que « même quand la procréation n'est pas possible, la vie conjugale ne perd pas pour autant sa valeur. La stérilité physique peut être l'occasion pour les époux de rendre d'autres services importants à la vie des personnes humaines, tels par exemple que l'adoption, les formes diverses d'œuvres éducatives, l'aide à d'autre familles, aux enfants pauvres ou handicapés » [59].

De nombreux chercheurs se sont engagés dans la lutte contre la stérilité. Tout en sauvegardant pleinement la dignité de la procréation humaine, certains sont arrivés à des résultats qui semblaient auparavant impossibles à atteindre. Les hommes de science doivent dont être encouragés à poursuivre leurs recherches, afin de prévenir les causes de la stérilité et de pouvoir la guérir, de sorte que les couples stériles puissent réussir à procréer dans le respect de leur dignité personnelle et de celle de l'enfant à naître.
III
MORALE ET LOI CIVILE

VALEURS ET OBLIGATIONS MORALES QUE LA LEGISLATION CIVILE DOIT RESPECTER ET SANCTIONNER EN CETTE MATIÈRE

Le droit inviolable à la vie de tout individu humain innocent, les droits de la famille et de l'institution matrimoniale, constituent des valeurs morales fondamentales, car elles concernent la condition naturelle et la vocation intégrale de la personne humaine; en même temps, ce sont des éléments constitutifs de la société civile et de sa législation.

Pour cette raison, les nouvelles possibilités technologiques, qui se sont ouvertes dans le champ de la biomédecine, appellent l'intervention des autorités politiques et du législateur, car un recours incontrôlé à ces techniques pourrait conduire à des conséquences imprévisibles et dangereuses pour la société civile. La référence à la conscience de chacun et à l'autodiscipline des chercheurs ne peut suffire au respect des droits personnels et de l'ordre public. Si le législateur, responsable du bien commun, manquait de vigilance, il pourrait être dépouillé de ses prérogatives par des chercheurs qui prétendraient gouverner l'humanité au nom des découvertes biologiques et des prétendus processus d'« amélioration » qui en dériveraient. L'« eugénisme » et les discriminations entre les êtres humains pourraient s'en trouver légitimés: ce qui constituerait une violence et une atteinte grave à l'égalité, à la dignité et aux droits fondamentaux de la personne humaine.

L'intervention de l'autorité politique doit s'inspirer des principes rationnels qui règlent les rapports entre la loi civile et la loi morale. La tâche de la loi civile est d'assurer le bien commun des personnes par la reconnaissance et la défense des droits fondamentaux, la promotion de la paix et de la moralité publique [60]. En aucun domaine de la vie, la loi civile ne peut se substituer à la conscience, ni dicter des normes sur ce qui échappe à sa compétence; elle doit parfois, pour le bien de l'ordre public, tolérer ce qu'elle ne peut interdire sans qu'en découle un dommage plus grave. Mais les droits inaliénables de la personne devront être reconnus et respectés par la société civile et l'autorité politique: ces droits de l'homme ne dépendent ni des individus, ni des parents, et ne représentent pas même une concession de la société et de l'État; ils appartiennent à la nature humaine et sont inhérents à la personne, en raison de l'acte créateur dont elle tire son origine.

Parmi ces droits fondamentaux, il faut à ce propos rappeler:

  1. a) le droit à la vie et à l'intégrité physique de tout être humain depuis la conception jusqu'à la mort;
  2. b) les droits de la famille et de l'institution matrimoniale, et, dans ce cadre, le droit pour l'enfant d'être conçu, mis au monde et éduqué par ses parents.

Sur chacun de ces deux thèmes, il convient de développer ici quelques considérations ultérieures.

Dans différents États, des lois ont autorisé la suppression directe d'innocents: dans le moment où une loi positive prive une catégorie d'êtres humains de la protection que la législation civile doit leur accorder, l'État en vient à nier l'égalité de tous devant la loi. Quand l'État ne met pas sa force au service des droits de tous les citoyens, et en particulier des plus faibles, les fondements mêmes d'un État de droit se trouvent menacés. L'autorité politique ne peut en conséquence approuver que des êtres humains soient appelés à l'existence par des procédures qui les exposent aux risques très graves rappelés plus haut. La reconnaissance éventuellement accordée par la loi positive et les autorités politiques aux techniques de transmission artificielle de la vie et aux expérimentations connexes rendrait plus large la brèche ouverte par la légalisation de l'avortement.

Comme conséquences du respect et de la protection qui doivent être assurés à l'enfant dès le moment de sa conception, la loi devra prévoir des sanctions pénales appropriées pour toute violation délibérée de ses droits. La loi ne pourra tolérer — elle devra même expressément proscrire — que des êtres humains, fussent-ils au stade embryonnaire, soient traités comme des objets d'expérimentation, mutilés ou détruits, sous prétexte qu'ils apparaîtraient inutiles ou inaptes à se développer normalement.

L'autorité politique est tenue de garantir à l'institution familiale, sur laquelle est fondée la société, la protection juridique à laquelle celle-ci a droit. Par le fait même qu'elle est au service des personnes, la société politique devra être aussi au service de la famille. La loi civile ne pourra accorder sa garantie à des techniques de procréation artificielle qui supprimeraient, au bénéfice de tierces personnes (médecins, biologistes, pouvoirs économiques ou gouvernementaux), ce qui constitue un droit inhérent à la relation entre les époux; elle ne pourra donc pas légaliser le don de gamètes entre personnes qui ne seraient pas légitimement unies en mariage.

La législation devra en outre proscrire, en vertu du soutien dû à la famille, les banques d'embryons, l'insémination post mortem et la maternité « de substitution ».

Il est du devoir de l’autorité publique d'agir de telle manière que la loi civile soit réglée sur les normes fondamentales de la loi morale pour tout ce qui concerne les droits de l'homme, de la vie humaine et de l'institution familiale. Les hommes politiques devront, par leur action sur l'opinion publique, s'employer à obtenir sur ces points essentiels le consensus le plus vaste possible dans la société, et à le consolider là où il risquerait d'être affaibli et amoindri.

Dans de nombreux pays, la législation sur l'avortement et la tolérance juridique des couples non-mariés rendent plus difficile d'obtenir le respect des droits fondamentaux rappelés dans cette Instruction. Il faut souhaiter que les États n'assument pas la responsabilité d'aggraver encore ces situations d'injustice socialement dommageables. Au contraire, il faut souhaiter que les nations et les États prennent conscience de toutes les implications culturelles, idéologiques et politiques liées aux techniques de procréation artificielle, et qu'ils sachent trouver la sagesse et le courage nécessaires pour promulguer des lois plus justes et plus respectueuses de la vie humaine et de l'institution familiale.

De nos jours, la législation civile de nombreux États confère aux yeux de beaucoup une légitimation indue à certaines pratiques; elle se montre incapable de garantir une moralité conforme aux exigences naturelles de la personne humaine et aux « lois non écrites » gravées par le Créateur dans le cœur de l'homme. Tous les hommes de bonne volonté doivent s'employer, spécialement dans leur milieu professionnel comme dans l'exercice de leurs droits civiques, à ce que soient réformées les lois civiles moralement inacceptables et modifiées les pratiques illicites. En outre, l'« objection de conscience » face à de telles lois doit être soulevée et reconnue. Bien plus, commence à se poser avec acuité à la conscience morale de beaucoup, notamment à celle de certains spécialistes des sciences biomédicales, l'exigence d'une résistance passive à la légitimation de pratiques contraires à la vie et à la dignité de l'homme.

CONCLUSION

La diffusion des technologies d'intervention sur les processus de la procréation humaine soulève de très graves problèmes moraux relatifs au respect dû à l'être humain dès sa conception et à la dignité de la personne, de sa sexualité et de la transmission de la vie.

Dans ce Document, la Congrégation pour la Doctrine de la Foi, exerçant sa charge de promouvoir et de protéger l'enseignement de l'Église dans une matière aussi grave, adresse un nouvel appel pressant à tous ceux qui, en raison de leur rôle et de leur engagement peuvent exercer une influence positive, pour que, dans la famille et dans la société, soit accordé le respect dû à la vie et à l'amour: aux responsables de la formation des consciences et de l'opinion publique, aux chercheurs et aux professionnels de la médecine, aux juristes et aux hommes politiques. Elle souhaite que tous comprennent l'incompatibilité qui subsiste entre la reconnaissance de la dignité de la personne humaine et le mépris de la vie et de l'amour, entre la foi au Dieu Vivant et la prétention de vouloir décider arbitrairement de l'origine et du sort d'un être humain.

La Congrégation pour la Doctrine de la Foi adresse en particulier un confiant appel et un encouragement aux théologiens et surtout aux moralistes, pour qu'ils approfondissent et rendent toujours plus accessibles aux fidèles les contenus de l'enseignement du Magistère de l'Église, à la lumière d'une anthropologie solide en matière de sexualité et de mariage, dans le contexte de l'approche interdisciplinaire nécessaire. On pourra ainsi comprendre toujours mieux les raisons et la validité de cet enseignement: en défendant l'homme contre les excès de son propre pouvoir, l'Église de Dieu lui rappelle les titres de sa véritable noblesse; c'est seulement ainsi qu'on pourra assurer à l'humanité de demain la possibilité de vivre et d'aimer dans cette dignité et cette liberté qui dérivent du respect de la vérité. Les indications précises données dans la présente Instruction n'entendent donc pas arrêter l'effort de réflexion, mais plutôt en favoriser une impulsion nouvelle, dans la fidélité constante à la doctrine de l'Église.

A la lumière de la vérité sur le don de la vie humaine et des principes moraux qui en découlent, chacun est invité à agir, dans le cadre de la responsabilité qui lui est propre, comme le Bon Samaritain, et à reconnaître aussi comme son prochain le plus petit parmi les enfants des hommes (cf. Lc 10, 29-37). La parole du Christ trouve ici une résonance nouvelle et particulière: « Ce que vous aurez fait au plus petit de mes frères, c'est à Moi que vous l'aurez fait » (Mt 25, 40).

Le Souverain Pontife Jean-Paul II, au cours de l'Audience accordée au Préfet soussigné après la réunion plénière de cette Congrégation, a approuvé la présente Instruction et en a ordonné la publication.

A Rome, au siège de la Congrégation pour la Doctrine de la Foi, le 22 février 1987, en la Fête de la Chaire de Saint Pierre Apôtre.

 

Joseph Card. Ratzinger
Préfet

+ Alberto Bovone
Archevêque tit. de Césarée de Numidie
Secrétaire

 

[1] Jean-Paul II, Discours aux participants au 81e Congrès de la Société Italienne de Médicine interne et au 82e Congrès de Chirurgie Générale, 27 octobre 1980: AAS 72 (1980) 1126.

[2] Paul VI, Discours à l'Assemblée Générale des Nations Unies, 4 octobre 1965, 1: AAS 57 (1965) 878; Enc. Populorum Progressio, 13: AAS 59 (1967) 263.

[3] Paul VI, Homélie durant la Messe de clôture de l'Année Sainte, 25 décembre 1975: AAS 68 (1976) 145; Jean-Paul II, Enc. Dives in Misericordia, 30: AAS 72 (1980) 1224.

[4] Jean-Paul II, Discours aux participants à la 35e Assemblée Générale de l’Association Médicale Mondiale, 29 octobre 1983: AAS 76 (1984) 390.

[5] Cf. Déclaration Dignitatis Humanae, 2.

[6] Const. past. Gaudium et Spes, 22; Jean-Paul II, Enc. Redemptor Hominis, 8: AAS 71 (1979) 270-272.

[7] Cf. Const. past. Gaudium et Spes, 35.

[8] Const. past. Gaudium et Spes, 15; cf. aussi Paul VI, Enc. Populorum Progressio, 20: AAS 59 (1967) 267; Jean-Paul II, Enc. Redemptor Hominis, 15: AAS 71 (1979) 286-289; Exhort. apost. Familiaris Consortio, 8: AAS 74 (1982) 89.

[9] Jean-Paul II, Exhort. apost. Familiaris Consortio, 11: AAS 74 (1982) 92.

[10] Cf. Paul VI, Enc. Humanae Vitae, 10: AAS 60 (1968) 487-488.

[11] Jean-Paul II, Discours aux participants à la 35e Assemblée Générale de l’Association Médicale Mondiale, 29 octobre 1983: AAS 16 (1984) 393.

[12] Cf. Jean-Paul II, Exhort. apost. Familiaris Consortio, 11: AAS 74 (1982) 91-92; cf. aussi Const. past. Gaudium et Spes, 50.

[13] Congrégation pour la Doctrine de la Foi, Déclaration sur l’avortement provoqué, 9: AAS 66 (1974) 736-737.

[14] Jean-Paul II, Discours aux participants à la 35e Assemblée Générale de l’Association Médicale Mondiale, 29 octobre 1983: AAS 76 (1984) 390.

[15] Jean XXIII, Enc. Mater et Magistra, III: AAS 53 (1961) 447.

[16] Const. past. Gaudium et Spes, 24.

[17] Cf. Pie XII, Enc. Humani Generis: AAS 42 (1950) 575; Paul VI, Solennelle Profession de Foi, 30 juin 1968: AAS 60 (1968) 436.

[18] Jean XXIII, Enc. Mater et Magistra, III: AAS 53 (1961) 447; cf. Jean-Paul II, Discours aux prêtres participant à un séminaire d'études sur « la procréation responsable », 17 septembre 1983: Insegnamenti di Giovanni Paolo II, VI, 2 (1983) 562: «A l'origine de toute personne humaine, il y a un acte créateur de Dieu; aucun homme ne vient à l'existence par hasard, il est toujours le terme de l'amour créateur de Dieu ».

[19] Cf. Const. past. Gaudium et Spes, 24.

[20] Cf. Pie XII, Discours à l'Union Médico-biologique «Saint-Luc », 12 novembre 1944: Discorsi e radiomessaggi, VI (1944-1945) 191-192.

[21] Cf. Const. past. Gaudium et Spes, 50.

[22] Cf. Const. past. Gaudium et Spes, 51: «Lorsqu'il s'agit de mettre en accord l'amour conjugal avec la transmission responsable de la vie, la moralité du comportement ne dépend pas de la seule sincérité de l'intention et de la seule appréciation des motifs; mais elle doit être déterminée selon des critères objectifs, tirés de la nature même de la personne et de ses actes, critères qui respectent, dans un contexte d'amour véritable, le sens intégral de la donation mutuelle et de la procréation humaine ».

[23] Const. past. Gaudium et Spes, 51.

[24] Charte des Droits de la Famille, publiée par le Saint-Siège, art. 4: L'Osservatore Romano, 25 novembre 1983.

[25] Congrégation pour la Doctrine de la Foi, Déclaration sur l’avortement provoqué, 12-13: AAS 66 (1974) 738.

[26] Cf. Paul VI, Discours aux participants au XXIIIe Congrès national des Juristes Catholiques Italiens, 9 décembre 1972: AAS 64 (1972) 777.

[27] L'obligation d'éviter des risques disproportionnés indique un authentique respect des êtres humains et la rectitude des intentions thérapeutiques; elle implique que le médecin « devra avant tout évaluer attentivement les conséquences négatives éventuelles qu'une technique déterminée d'exploration pourrait avoir sur l'embryon, et (qu') il évitera de recourir à des procédés de diagnostic dont l'honnête finalité et innocuité substantielle ne présente pas de garanties suffisantes. Et si, comme il arrive souvent dans les choix humains, un certain risque doit être affronté, il se préoccupera de vérifier s'il est justifié par une urgence vraie du diagnostic et par l'importance des résultats qui seront obtenus en faveur de l'embryon lui-même » (Jean-Paul II, Discours aux participants au Congrès du «Mouvement pour la vie», 3 décembre 1982: Insegnamenti di Giovanni Paolo II, V, 3 [1982] 1512). On doit tenir compte de cette précision sur le « risque proportionné » dans les passages successifs de cette Instruction, toutes les fois qu'y apparaît la même expression.

[28] Jean-Paul II, Discours aux participants à la 35e Assemblée Générale de l’Association Médicale Mondiale, 29 octobre 1983: AAS 76 (1984) 392.

[29] Cf. Jean-Paul II, Discours aux participants à un Congrès de l'Académie Pontificale des Sciences, 23 octobre 1982: AAS 75 (1983) 37: «Je condamne de la manière la plus explicite et la plus formelle les manipulations expérimentales faites sur l'embryon humain, car l'être humain, depuis sa conception jusqu'à sa mort, ne peut être exploité pour aucune raison ».

[30] Charte des Droits de la Famille, publiée par le Saint-Siège, art. 4/b: L'Osservatore Romano, 25 novembre 1983.

[31] Cf. Jean-Paul II, Discours aux participants au Congrès du « Mouvement pour la vie », 3 décembre 1982: Insegnamenti di Giovanni Paolo II, V, 3 (1982) 1511: «Toute forme d'expérience sur le fœtus qui pourrait en altérer l'intégrité ou en aggraver les conditions, à moins qu'il ne s'agisse d'une tentative extrême de la sauver d'une mort certaine, est moralement inacceptable ». Congrégation pour la Doctrine de la Foi, Déclaration sur l'euthanasie, 4: AAS 72: (1980) 550: «A défaut d'autres remèdes, il est licite de recourir, avec le consentement du malade, aux moyens fournis par la médecine la plus avancée, même s'ils sont encore au stade expérimental et ne sont pas exempts de quelques risques ».

[32] Nul ne peut revendiquer, avant d'exister, un droit subjectif à venir à l'existence; toutefois, il est légitime d'affirmer le droit de l'enfant à avoir une origine pleinement humaine grâce à une conception conforme à la nature personnelle de l'être humain. La vie est un don qui doit être accordé d'une manière digne aussi bien du sujet qui la reçoit que des sujets qui la transmettent. On devra également tenir compte de cette précision pour ce qui sera expliqué à propos de la procréation humaine artificielle.

[33] Cf. Jean-Paul II, Discours aux participants à la 35e Assemblée Générale de l’Association Médicale Mondiale, 29 octobre 1983: AAS 76 (1984) 391.

[34] Cf. Const. past. Gaudium et Spes, 50.

[35] Cf. Jean-Paul II, Exhort. apost. Familiaris Consortio, 14: AAS 74 (1982) 96.

[36] Cf. Pie XII, Discours aux participants au VIe Congrès International des Médecins Catholiques, 29 septembre 1949: AAS 41 (1949) 559: Selon le plan du Dieu Créateur, «l'homme abandonne son père et sa mère et s'unit à sa femme, et les deux deviennent une seule chair » (Gen 2, 24). L'unité du mariage, liée à l'ordre de la création, est une vérité accessible à la raison naturelle. La Tradition et le Magistère de l'Église se réfèrent souvent au livre de la Genèse, soit directement soit à travers les passages du Nouveau Testament qui y font référence: Mt 19, 4-6; Me 10, 5-8; Ep 5, 31. Cf. Athenagore, Legatio pro christianis, 33: PG 6, 965-967; S. Jean Chrysostome, In Matthaeum homiliae, LXII, 19, 1: PG 58, 597; S. Léon le Grand, Epist. ad Rusticum, 4: PL 54, 1204; Innocent III, Ep. Gaudemus in Domino: DS 778; IIe Concile de Lyon, IVe Session: DS 860; Concile de Trente, XXIVe Session: DS 1798, 1802; Léon XIII, Enc. Arcanum Divinae Sapientiae: ASS 12 (1879-80) 388-391; Pie XI, Enc. Casti Connubii: AAS 22 (1930) 546-547; Concile Vatican II, Const. past. Gaudium et Spes, 48; Jean-Paul II, Exhort. apost. Familiaris Consortio, 19: AAS 74 (1982) 101-102; C.I.C., can. 1056.

[37] Cf. Pie XII, Discours aux participants au IVe Congrès International des Médecins Catholiques, 29 septembre 1949: AAS 41 (1949) 560; Discours aux congressistes de l'Union Catholique Italienne des sages-femmes, 29 octobre 1951: AAS 43 (1951) 850; C.I.C., can. 1134.

[38] Paul VI, Enc. Humanae Vitae, 12: AAS 60 (1968) 488-489.

[39] Loc. cit.: ibid. 489.

[40] Pie XII, Discours aux participants au IIe Congrès Mondial de Naples sur la fécondité et la stérilité humaine, 19 mai 1956: AAS 48 (1956) 470.

[41] C.I.C., can. 1061. Selon ce canon, l'acte conjugal est celui par lequel est consommé le mariage si les époux « l'ont posé entre eux de manière humaine ».

[42] Cf. Const. past. Gaudium et Spes, 14.

[43] Jean-Paul II, Audience générale, 16 janvier 1980: Insegnamenti di Giovanni Paolo II, III, 1 (1980), 148-152.

[44] Jean-Paul II, Discours aux participants à la 35e Assemblée Générale de l’Association Médicale Mondiale, 29 octobre 1983: AAS 76 (1984) 393.

[45] Cf. Const. past. Gaudium et Spes, 51.

[46] Cf. Const. past. Gaudium et Spes, 50.

[47] Cf. Pie XII, Discours aux participants au IVe Congrès International des Médecins Catholiques, 29 septembre 1949: AAS 41 (1949) 560: « Il serait faux de penser que la possibilité de recourir à ce moyen [fécondation artificielle] pourrait rendre valide un mariage entre personnes inaptes à la contracter du fait de l'empêchement d'impuissance ».

[48] Une question analogue est traitée par Paul VI, Enc. Humanae Vitae, 14: AAS 60 (1968) 490-491.

[49] Cf. supra, I, 1 sq.

[50] Jean-Paul II, Exhort. apost. Familiaris Consortio, 14: AAS 74 (1982) 96.

[51] Cf. Réponse du Saint-Office, 17 mars 1897: DS 3323; Pie XII, Discours aux participants au IVe Congrès International des Médecins Catholique, 29 septembre 1949: AAS 41 (1949) 560; Discours aux congressistes de l'Union Catholique Italienne des sages-femmes, 29 octobre 1951: AAS 43 (1951) 850; Discours aux participants au IIe Congrès Mondial de Naples sur la fécondité et la stérilité humaine, 19 mai 1956: AAS 48 (1956) 471-473; Discours aux participants au VIIe Congrès International de la Société Internationale d'Hématologie, 12 septembre 1958: AAS 50 (1958) 733; Jean XXIII, Enc. Mater et Magistra, III: AAS 53 (1961) 447.

[52] Pie XII, Discours aux congressistes de l'Union Catholique Italienne des sages-femmes, 29 octobre 1951: AAS 43 (1951) 850.

[53] Pie XII, Discours aux participants au IVe Congrès International des Médecins Catholiques, 29 septembre 1949: AAS 41 (1949) 560.

[54] Congrégation pour la Doctrine de la Foi, Déclaration sur certaines questions d'éthique sexuelle, 9: AAS 68 (1976) 86, qui cite la Const. past. Gaudium et Spes, 51; cf. Décret du Saint-Office, 2 août 1929: AAS 21 (1929) 490; Pie XII, Discours aux participants au XXVIe Congrès de la Société Italienne d'Urologie, 8 octobre 1953: AAS 45 (1953) 678.

[55] Cf. Jean XXIII, Enc. Mater et Magistra, III: AAS 53 (1961) 447.

[56] Cf. Pie XII, Discours aux participants au IVe Congrès International des Médecins Catholiques, 29 septembre 1949: AAS 41 (1949) 560.

[57] Cf. Pie XII, Discours aux participants au IIe Congrès Mondial de Naples sur la fécondité et la stérilité humaine, 19 mai 1956: AAS 48 (1956) 471-473.

[58] Const. past. Gaudium et Spes, 50.

[59] Jean-Paul II, Exhort. apost. Familiaris Consortio, 14: AAS 74 (1982) 97.

[60] Cf. Déclar. Dignitatis Humanae, 7.

 

ONLINE COURSE ON HUMAN TRAFFICKING

OUR MISSION:

THE PURPOSE IS TO SHARE BEST PRACTICES AND PROMOTE ACTIONS AGAINST HUMAN TRAFFICKING.

WE MAKE AVAILABLE TO YOU GUIDES AND RESEARCH ON TRAFFICKING IN HUMAN BEINGS FROM THE MOST RECOGNISED LEGAL AND OPERATIONAL ACTORS.

Human Trafficking – Interview with Prof. Michel Veuthey, Order of Malta

POPE’S PAYER INTENTION FOR FEBRUARY 2020: Hear the cries of migrants victims of human trafficking

FRANCE – BLOG DU COLLECTIF “CONTRE LA TRAITE DES ÊTRES HUMAINS”

Church on the frontlines in fight against human trafficking

Holy See – PUBLICATION OF PASTORAL ORIENTATIONS ON HUMAN TRAFFICKING 2019

RIGHT TO LIFE AND HUMAN DIGNITY GUIDEBOOK

Catholic social teaching

Doctrine sociale de l’Église catholique

That Moment Your Inner Activist Awakens: Nobel Peace Prize winner Kailash Satyarthi

Pope Francis joins religious leaders of different faiths, in fight against modern slavery

Michel Veuthey talks about the Order of Malta’s involvement in fighting human trafficking

Gaudete et exsultate- A guide to Christianity for the 21st Century: the new Apostolic Exhortation of Pope Francis

QUELS SONT LES OBJECTIFS, LES MOYENS ET LES VALEURS QUI ANIMENT LA POLITIQUE EXTÉRIEURE DU VATICAN DIRIGÉ PAR LE PAPE FRANÇOIS ?

A WOMAN CAPTURED – Domestic slave for 10 years

THE ENOUGH PROJECT – END CONFLICTS & SUPPLY CHAINS

TED – HOW TO FIGHT MODERN SLAVERY (Kevin Bales)?

BLOOD AND EARTH : MODERN SLAVERY, ECOCIDE AND THE SECRET TO SAVING THE WORLD

NEW CANNIBAL MARKETS : GLOBALIZATION AND COMMODIFICATION OF THE HUMAN BODY

Photographer Lisa Kristine travels the world documenting the unbearably harsh realities of modern-day slavery

POSTS LIST