Select Page

VATICAN — INSTRUCTION ON RESPECT FOR HUMAN LIFE IN ITS ORIGIN AND ON THE DIGNITY OF PROCREATION REPLIES TO CERTAIN QUESTIONS OF THE DAY — - INSTRUCTION DONUM VITAE SUR LE RESPECT DE LA VIE HUMAINE NAISSANTE ET LA DIGNITÉ DE LA PROCRÉATION. RÉPONSES A QUELQUES QUESTIONS D’ACTUALITÉ

VATICAN — INSTRUCTION ON RESPECT FOR HUMAN LIFE IN ITS ORIGIN  AND ON THE DIGNITY OF PROCREATION  REPLIES TO CERTAIN QUESTIONS OF THE DAY — - INSTRUCTION  DONUM VITAE  SUR LE RESPECT DE LA VIE HUMAINE NAISSANTE  ET LA DIGNITÉ DE LA PROCRÉATION. RÉPONSES A QUELQUES QUESTIONS D’ACTUALITÉ
Advertisement

http://www.vatican.va/roman_curia/congregations/cfaith/documents/rc_con_cfaith_doc_19870222_respect-for-human-life_en.html

 

Note: You can find the french version of this text below.

 

CONGREGATION FOR THE DOCTRINE OF THE FAITH 


INSTRUCTION ON RESPECT FOR HUMAN LIFE IN ITS ORIGIN
AND ON THE DIGNITY OF PROCREATION
REPLIES TO CERTAIN QUESTIONS OF THE DAY

FOREWORD

The Con­gre­ga­tion for the Doc­trine of the Faith has been approached by var­i­ous Epis­co­pal Con­fer­ences or indi­vid­ual Bish­ops, by the­olo­gians, doc­tors and sci­en­tists, con­cern­ing bio­med­ical tech­niques which make it pos­si­ble to inter­vene in the ini­tial phase of the life of a human being and in the very process­es of pro­cre­ation and their con­for­mi­ty with the prin­ci­ples of Catholic moral­i­ty. The present Instruc­tion, which is the result of wide con­sul­ta­tion and in par­tic­u­lar of a care­ful eval­u­a­tion of the dec­la­ra­tions made by Epis­co­pates, does not intend to repeat all the Church’s teach­ing on the dig­ni­ty of human life as it orig­i­nates and on pro­cre­ation, but to offer, in the light of the pre­vi­ous teach­ing of the Mag­is­teri­um, some spe­cif­ic replies to the main ques­tions being asked in this regard. The expo­si­tion is arranged as fol­lows: an intro­duc­tion will recall the fun­da­men­tal prin­ci­ples, of an anthro­po­log­i­cal and moral char­ac­ter, which are nec­es­sary for a prop­er eval­u­a­tion of the prob­lems and for work­ing out replies to those ques­tions; the first part will have as its sub­ject respect for the human being from the first moment of his or her exis­tence; the sec­ond part will deal with the moral ques­tions raised by tech­ni­cal inter­ven­tions on human pro­cre­ation; the third part will offer some ori­en­ta­tions on the rela­tion­ships between moral law and civ­il law in terms of the respect due to human embryos and foe­tus­es* and as regards the legit­i­ma­cy of tech­niques of arti­fi­cial procreation.

* The terms “zygote”, “pre-embryo”, “embryo” and “foe­tus” can indi­cate in the vocab­u­lary of biol­o­gy suc­ces­sive stages of the devel­op­ment of a human being. The present Instruc­tion makes free use of these terms, attribut­ing to them an iden­ti­cal eth­i­cal rel­e­vance, in order to des­ig­nate the result (whether vis­i­ble or not) of human gen­er­a­tion, from the first moment of its exis­tence until birth. The rea­son for this usage is clar­i­fied by the text (cf I, 1).

CONCLUSION

The spread of tech­nolo­gies of inter­ven­tion in the process­es of human pro­cre­ation rais­es very seri­ous moral prob­lems in rela­tion to the respect due to the human being from the moment of con­cep­tion, to the dig­ni­ty of the per­son, of his or her sex­u­al­i­ty, and of the trans­mis­sion of life. With this Instruc­tion the Con­gre­ga­tion for the Doc­trine of the Faith, in ful­fill­ing its respon­si­bil­i­ty to pro­mote and defend the Church’s teach­ing in so seri­ous a mat­ter, address­es a new and heart­felt invi­ta­tion to all those who, by rea­son of their role and their com­mit­ment, can exer­cise a pos­i­tive influ­ence and ensure that, in the fam­i­ly and in soci­ety, due respect is accord­ed to life and love. It address­es this invi­ta­tion to those respon­si­ble for the for­ma­tion of con­sciences and of pub­lic opin­ion, to sci­en­tists and med­ical pro­fes­sion­als, to jurists and politi­cians. It hopes that all will under­stand the incom­pat­i­bil­i­ty between recog­ni­tion of the dig­ni­ty of the human per­son and con­tempt for life and love, between faith in the liv­ing God and the claim to decide arbi­trar­i­ly the ori­gin and fate of a human being. 

In par­tic­u­lar, the Con­gre­ga­tion for the Doc­trine of the Faith address­es an invi­ta­tion with con­fi­dence and encour­age­ment to the­olo­gians, and above all to moral­ists, that they study more deeply and make eves more acces­si­ble to the faith­ful the con­tents of the teach­ing of the Church’s Mag­is­teri­um in the light of a valid anthro­pol­o­gy in the mat­ter of sex­u­al­i­ty and mar­riage and in the con­text of the nec­es­sary inter­dis­ci­pli­nary approach. Thus they will make it pos­si­ble to under­stand ever more clear­ly the rea­sons for and the valid­i­ty of this teach­ing. By defend­ing man against the excess­es of his own pow­er, the Church of God reminds him of the rea­sons for his true nobil­i­ty; only in this way can the pos­si­bil­i­ty of liv­ing and lov­ing with that dig­ni­ty and lib­er­ty which derive from respect for the truth be ensured for the men and women of tomor­row. The pre­cise indi­ca­tions which are offered in the present Instruc­tion there­fore are not meant to halt the effort of reflec­tion but rather to give it a renewed impulse in unre­nounce­able fideli­ty to the teach­ing of the Church. 

In the light of the truth about the gift of human life and in the light of the moral prin­ci­ples which flow from that truth, every­one is invit­ed to act in the area of respon­si­bil­i­ty prop­er to each and, like the good Samar­i­tan, to rec­og­nize as a neigh­bour even the lit­tlest among the chil­dren of men (Cf . Lk 10: 2 9–37). Here Christ’s words find a new and par­tic­u­lar echo: “What you do to one of the least of my brethren, you do unto me” (Mt 25:40).

Dur­ing an audi­ence grant­ed to the under­signed Pre­fect after the ple­nary ses­sion of the Con­gre­ga­tion for the Doc­trine of the Faith, the Supreme Pon­tiff, John Paul II, approved this Instruc­tion and ordered it to be published. 

Giv­en at Rome, from the Con­gre­ga­tion for the Doc­trine of the Faith, Feb­ru­ary 22, 1987, the Feast of the Chair of St. Peter, the Apostle.

INTRODUCTION

1. BIOMEDICAL RESEARCH AND THE TEACHING
OF THE CHURCH 

The gift of life which God the Cre­ator and Father has entrust­ed to man calls him to appre­ci­ate the ines­timable val­ue of what he has been giv­en and to take respon­si­bil­i­ty for it: this fun­da­men­tal prin­ci­ple must be placed at the cen­tre of one’s reflec­tion in order to clar­i­fy and solve the moral prob­lems raised by arti­fi­cial inter­ven­tions on life as it orig­i­nates and on the process­es of pro­cre­ation. Thanks to the progress of the bio­log­i­cal and med­ical sci­ences, man has at his dis­pos­al ever more effec­tive ther­a­peu­tic resources; but he can also acquire new pow­ers, with unfore­see­able con­se­quences, over human life at its very begin­ning and in its first stages. Var­i­ous pro­ce­dures now make it pos­si­ble to inter­vene not only in order to assist but also to dom­i­nate the process­es of pro­cre­ation. These tech­niques can enable man to “take in hand his own des­tiny”, but they also expose him “to the temp­ta­tion to go beyond the lim­its of a rea­son­able domin­ion over nature”.(1) They might con­sti­tute progress in the ser­vice of man, but they also involve seri­ous risks. Many peo­ple are there­fore express­ing an urgent appeal that in inter­ven­tions on pro­cre­ation the val­ues and rights of the human per­son be safe­guard­ed. Requests for clar­i­fi­ca­tion and guid­ance are com­ing not only from the faith­ful but also from those who rec­og­nize the Church as “an expert in human­i­ty ” (2) with a mis­sion to serve the “civ­i­liza­tion of love” (3) and of life.

The Church’s Mag­is­teri­um does not inter­vene on the basis of a par­tic­u­lar com­pe­tence in the area of the exper­i­men­tal sci­ences; but hav­ing tak­en account of the data of research and tech­nol­o­gy, it intends to put for­ward, by virtue of its evan­gel­i­cal mis­sion and apos­tolic duty, the moral teach­ing cor­re­spond­ing to the dig­ni­ty of the per­son and to his or her inte­gral voca­tion. It intends to do so by expound­ing the cri­te­ria of moral judg­ment as regards the appli­ca­tions of sci­en­tif­ic research and tech­nol­o­gy, espe­cial­ly in rela­tion to human life and its begin­nings. These cri­te­ria are the respect, defence and pro­mo­tion of man, his “pri­ma­ry and fun­da­men­tal right” to life,(4) his dig­ni­ty as a per­son who is endowed with a spir­i­tu­al soul and with moral respon­si­bil­i­ty (5) and who is called to beatif­ic com­mu­nion with God. The Church’s inter­ven­tion in this field is inspired also by the Love which she owes to man, help­ing him to rec­og­nize and respect his rights and duties. This love draws from the fount of Christ’s love: as she con­tem­plates the mys­tery of the Incar­nate Word, the Church also comes to under­stand the “mys­tery of man”; (6) by pro­claim­ing the Gospel of sal­va­tion, she reveals to man his dig­ni­ty and invites him to dis­cov­er ful­ly the truth of his own being. Thus the Church once more puts for­ward the divine law in order to accom­plish the work of truth and lib­er­a­tion. For it is out of good­ness — in order to indi­cate the path of life — that God gives human beings his com­mand­ments and the grace to observe them: and it is like­wise out of good­ness — in order to help them per­se­vere along the same path — that God always offers to every­one his for­give­ness. Christ has com­pas­sion on our weak­ness­es: he is our Cre­ator and Redeemer. May his spir­it open men’s hearts to the gift of God’s peace and to an under­stand­ing of his precepts.

2. SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY
AT THE SERVICE OF THE HUMAN PERSON 

God cre­at­ed man in his own image and like­ness: “male and female he cre­at­ed them” (Gen 1: 27 ), entrust­ing to them the task of “hav­ing domin­ion over the earth” (Gen 1:28). Basic sci­en­tif­ic research and applied research con­sti­tute a sig­nif­i­cant expres­sion of this domin­ion of man over cre­ation. Sci­ence and tech­nol­o­gy are valu­able resources for man when placed at his ser­vice and when they pro­mote his inte­gral devel­op­ment for the ben­e­fit of all; but they can­not of them­selves show the mean­ing of exis­tence and of human progress. Being ordered to man, who ini­ti­ates and devel­ops them, they draw from the per­son and his moral val­ues the indi­ca­tion of their pur­pose and the aware­ness of their limits.

It would on the one hand be illu­so­ry to claim that sci­en­tif­ic research and its appli­ca­tions are moral­ly neu­tral; on the oth­er hand one can­not derive cri­te­ria for guid­ance from mere tech­ni­cal effi­cien­cy, from research’s pos­si­ble use­ful­ness to some at the expense of oth­ers, or, worse still, from pre­vail­ing ide­olo­gies. Thus sci­ence and tech­nol­o­gy require, for their own intrin­sic mean­ing, an uncon­di­tion­al respect for the fun­da­men­tal cri­te­ria of the moral law: that is to say, they must be at the ser­vice of the human per­son, of his inalien­able rights and his true and inte­gral good accord­ing to the design and will of God.(7) The rapid devel­op­ment of tech­no­log­i­cal dis­cov­er­ies gives greater urgency to this need to respect the cri­te­ria just men­tioned: sci­ence with­out con­science can only lead to man’s ruin. “Our era needs such wis­dom more than bygone ages if the dis­cov­er­ies made by man are to be fur­ther human­ized. For the future of the world stands in per­il unless wis­er peo­ple are forthcoming”.(8)

3. ANTHROPOLOGY AND PROCEDURES
IN THE BIOMEDICAL FIELD 

Which moral cri­te­ria must be applied in order to clar­i­fy the prob­lems posed today in the field of bio­med­i­cine? The answer to this ques­tion pre­sup­pos­es a prop­er idea of the nature of the human per­son in his bod­i­ly dimension.

For it is only in keep­ing with his true nature that the human per­son can achieve self-real­iza­tion as a “uni­fied totality”:(9) and this nature is at the same time cor­po­ral and spir­i­tu­al. By virtue of its sub­stan­tial union with a spir­i­tu­al soul, the human body can­not be con­sid­ered as a mere com­plex of tis­sues, organs and func­tions, nor can it be eval­u­at­ed in the same way as the body of ani­mals; rather it is a con­sti­tu­tive part of the per­son who man­i­fests and express­es him­self through it. The nat­ur­al moral law express­es and lays down the pur­pos­es, rights and duties which are based upon the bod­i­ly and spir­i­tu­al nature of the human per­son. There­fore this law can­not be thought of as sim­ply a set of norms on the bio­log­i­cal lev­el; rather it must be defined as the ratio­nal order where­by man is called by the Cre­ator to direct and reg­u­late his life and actions and in par­tic­u­lar to make use of his own body.(10) A first con­se­quence can be deduced from these prin­ci­ples: an inter­ven­tion on the human body affects not only the tis­sues, the organs and their func­tions but also involves the per­son him­self on dif­fer­ent lev­els. It involves, there­fore, per­haps in an implic­it but nonethe­less real way, a moral sig­nif­i­cance and respon­si­bil­i­ty. Pope John Paul II force­ful­ly reaf­firmed this to the World Med­ical Asso­ci­a­tion when he said: “Each human per­son, in his absolute­ly unique sin­gu­lar­i­ty, is con­sti­tut­ed not only by his spir­it, but by his body as well. Thus, in the body and through the body, one touch­es the per­son him­self in his con­crete real­i­ty. To respect the dig­ni­ty of man con­se­quent­ly amounts to safe­guard­ing this iden­ti­ty of the man ‘cor­pore et ani­ma unus’, as the Sec­ond Vat­i­can Coun­cil says (Gaudi­um et Spes, 14, par.1). It is on the basis of this anthro­po­log­i­cal vision that one is to find the fun­da­men­tal cri­te­ria for deci­sion-mak­ing in the case of pro­ce­dures which are not strict­ly ther­a­peu­tic, as, for exam­ple, those aimed at the improve­ment of the human bio­log­i­cal condition”.(11)

Applied biol­o­gy and med­i­cine work togeth­er for the inte­gral good of human life when they come to the aid of a per­son strick­en by ill­ness and infir­mi­ty and when they respect his or her dig­ni­ty as a crea­ture of God. No biol­o­gist or doc­tor can rea­son­ably claim, by virtue of his sci­en­tif­ic com­pe­tence, to be able to decide on peo­ple’s ori­gin and des­tiny. This norm must be applied in a par­tic­u­lar way in the field of sex­u­al­i­ty and pro­cre­ation, in which man and woman actu­al­ize the fun­da­men­tal val­ues of love and life. God, who is love and life, has inscribed in man and woman the voca­tion to share in a spe­cial way in his mys­tery of per­son­al com­mu­nion and in his work as Cre­ator and Father.(12) For this rea­son mar­riage pos­sess­es spe­cif­ic goods and val­ues in its union and in pro­cre­ation which can­not be likened to those exist­ing in low­er forms of life. Such val­ues and mean­ings are of the per­son­al order and deter­mine from the moral point of view the mean­ing and lim­its of arti­fi­cial inter­ven­tions on pro­cre­ation and on the ori­gin of human life. These inter­ven­tions are not to be reject­ed on the grounds that they are arti­fi­cial. As such, they bear wit­ness to the pos­si­bil­i­ties of the art of med­i­cine. But they must be giv­en a moral eval­u­a­tion in ref­er­ence to the dig­ni­ty of the human per­son, who is called to real­ize his voca­tion from God to the gift of love and the gift of life.

4. FUNDAMENTAL CRITERIA FOR A MORAL JUDGMENT 

The fun­da­men­tal val­ues con­nect­ed with the tech­niques of arti­fi­cial human pro­cre­ation are two: the life of the human being called into exis­tence and the spe­cial nature of the trans­mis­sion of human life in mar­riage. The moral judg­ment on such meth­ods of arti­fi­cial pro­cre­ation must there­fore be for­mu­lat­ed in ref­er­ence to these values.

Phys­i­cal life, with which the course of human life in the world begins, cer­tain­ly does not itself con­tain the whole of a per­son­’s val­ue, nor does it rep­re­sent the supreme good of man who is called to eter­nal life. How­ev­er it does con­sti­tute in a cer­tain way the “fun­da­men­tal ” val­ue of life, pre­cise­ly because upon this phys­i­cal life all the oth­er val­ues of the per­son are based and developed.(13) The invi­o­la­bil­i­ty of the inno­cent human being’s right to life “from the moment of con­cep­tion until death” (14) is a sign and require­ment of the very invi­o­la­bil­i­ty of the per­son to whom the Cre­ator has giv­en the gift of life. By com­par­i­son with the trans­mis­sion of oth­er forms of life in the uni­verse, the trans­mis­sion of human life has a spe­cial char­ac­ter of its own, which derives from the spe­cial nature of the human per­son. “The trans­mis­sion of human life is entrust­ed by nature to a per­son­al and con­scious act and as such is sub­ject to the all-holy laws of God: immutable and invi­o­lable laws which must be rec­og­nized and observed. For this rea­son one can­not use means and fol­low meth­ods which could be lic­it in the trans­mis­sion of the life of plants and ani­mals” (15)

Advances in tech­nol­o­gy have now made it pos­si­ble to pro­cre­ate apart from sex­u­al rela­tions through the meet­ing in vit­ro of the germ-cells pre­vi­ous­ly tak­en from the man and the woman. But what is tech­ni­cal­ly pos­si­ble is not for that very rea­son moral­ly admis­si­ble. Ratio­nal reflec­tion on the fun­da­men­tal val­ues of life and of human pro­cre­ation is there­fore indis­pens­able for for­mu­lat­ing a moral eval­u­a­tion of such tech­no­log­i­cal inter­ven­tions on a human being from the first stages of his development.

5. TEACHINGS OF THE MAGISTERIUM 

On its part, the Mag­is­teri­um of the Church offers to human rea­son in this field too the light of Rev­e­la­tion: the doc­trine con­cern­ing man taught by the Mag­is­teri­um con­tains many ele­ments which throw light on the prob­lems being faced here. From the moment of con­cep­tion, the life of every human being is to be respect­ed in an absolute way because man is the only crea­ture on earth that God has “wished for him­self ” (16) and the spir­i­tu­al soul of each man is “imme­di­ate­ly cre­at­ed” by God; (17) his whole being bears the image of the Cre­ator. Human life is sacred because from its begin­ning it involves “the cre­ative action of God” (18) and it remains for­ev­er in a spe­cial rela­tion­ship with the Cre­ator, who is its sole end.(19) God alone is the Lord of life from its begin­ning until its end: no one can, in any cir­cum­stance, claim for him­self the right to destroy direct­ly an inno­cent human being. (20) Human pro­cre­ation requires on the part of the spous­es respon­si­ble col­lab­o­ra­tion with the fruit­ful love of God; (21) the gift of human life must be actu­al­ized in mar­riage through the spe­cif­ic and exclu­sive acts of hus­band and wife, in accor­dance with the laws inscribed in their per­sons and in their union.(22)

I. RESPECT FOR HUMAN EMBRYOS 

Care­ful reflec­tion on this teach­ing of the Mag­is­teri­um and on the evi­dence of rea­son, as men­tioned above, enables us to respond to the numer­ous moral prob­lems posed by tech­ni­cal inter­ven­tions upon the human being in the first phas­es of his life and upon the process­es of his conception.

1. WHAT RESPECT IS DUE TO THE HUMAN EMBRYO, TAKING INTO ACCOUNT HIS NATURE AND IDENTITY?

The human being must be respect­ed — as a per­son — from the very first instant of his exis­tence. The imple­men­ta­tion of pro­ce­dures of arti­fi­cial fer­til­iza­tion has made pos­si­ble var­i­ous inter­ven­tions upon embryos and human foe­tus­es. The aims pur­sued are of var­i­ous kinds: diag­nos­tic and ther­a­peu­tic, sci­en­tif­ic and com­mer­cial. From all of this, seri­ous prob­lems arise. Can one speak of a right to exper­i­men­ta­tion upon human embryos for the pur­pose of sci­en­tif­ic research? What norms or laws should be worked out with regard to this mat­ter? The response to these prob­lems pre­sup­pos­es a detailed reflec­tion on the nature and spe­cif­ic iden­ti­ty — the word “sta­tus” is used — of the human embryo itself .

At the Sec­ond Vat­i­can Coun­cil, the Church for her part pre­sent­ed once again to mod­ern man her con­stant and cer­tain doc­trine accord­ing to which: “Life once con­ceived, must be pro­tect­ed with the utmost care; abor­tion and infan­ti­cide are abom­inable crimes”. (23) More recent­ly, the Char­ter of the Rights of the Fam­i­ly, pub­lished by the Holy See, con­firmed that “Human life must be absolute­ly respect­ed and pro­tect­ed from the moment of conception”.(24)

This Con­gre­ga­tion is aware of the cur­rent debates con­cern­ing the begin­ning of human life, con­cern­ing the indi­vid­u­al­i­ty of the human being and con­cern­ing the iden­ti­ty of the human per­son. The Con­gre­ga­tion recalls the teach­ings found in the Dec­la­ra­tion on Pro­cured Abor­tion: “From the time that the ovum is fer­til­ized, a new life is begun which is nei­ther that of the father nor of the moth­er; it is rather the life of a new human being with his own growth. It would nev­er be made human if it were not human already. To this per­pet­u­al evi­dence … mod­ern genet­ic sci­ence brings valu­able con­fir­ma­tion. It has demon­strat­ed that, from the first instant, the pro­gramme is fixed as to what this liv­ing being will be: a man, this indi­vid­ual-man with his char­ac­ter­is­tic aspects already well deter­mined. Right from fer­til­iza­tion is begun the adven­ture of a human life, and each of its great capac­i­ties requires time … to find its place and to be in a posi­tion to act”. (25) This teach­ing remains valid and is fur­ther con­firmed, if con­fir­ma­tion were need­ed, by recent find­ings of human bio­log­i­cal sci­ence which rec­og­nize that in the zygote* result­ing from fer­til­iza­tion the bio­log­i­cal iden­ti­ty of a new human indi­vid­ual is already con­sti­tut­ed. Cer­tain­ly no exper­i­men­tal datum can be in itself suf­fi­cient to bring us to the recog­ni­tion of a spir­i­tu­al soul; nev­er­the­less, the con­clu­sions of sci­ence regard­ing the human embryo pro­vide a valu­able indi­ca­tion for dis­cern­ing by the use of rea­son a per­son­al pres­ence at the moment of this first appear­ance of a human life: how could a human indi­vid­ual not be a human per­son? The Mag­is­teri­um has not express­ly com­mit­ted itself to an affir­ma­tion of a philo­soph­i­cal nature, but it con­stant­ly reaf­firms the moral con­dem­na­tion of any kind of pro­cured abor­tion. This teach­ing has not been changed and is unchangeable.(26)

Thus the fruit of human gen­er­a­tion, from the first moment of its exis­tence, that is to say from the moment the zygote has formed, demands the uncon­di­tion­al respect that is moral­ly due to the human being in his bod­i­ly and spir­i­tu­al total­i­ty. The human being is to be respect­ed and treat­ed as a per­son from the moment of con­cep­tion; and there­fore from that same moment his rights as a per­son must be rec­og­nized, among which in the first place is the invi­o­lable right of every inno­cent human being to life. This doc­tri­nal reminder pro­vides the fun­da­men­tal cri­te­ri­on for the solu­tion of the var­i­ous prob­lems posed by the devel­op­ment of the bio­med­ical sci­ences in this field: since the embryo must be treat­ed as a per­son, it must also be defend­ed in its integri­ty, tend­ed and cared for, to the extent pos­si­ble, in the same way as any oth­er human being as far as med­ical assis­tance is concerned.

* The zygote is the cell pro­duced when the nuclei of the two gametes have fused.

2. IS PRENATAL DIAGNOSIS MORALLY LICIT?

If pre­na­tal diag­no­sis respects the life and integri­ty of the embryo and the human foe­tus and is direct­ed towards its safe­guard­ing or heal­ing as an indi­vid­ual, then the answer is affirmative.

For pre­na­tal diag­no­sis makes it pos­si­ble to know the con­di­tion of the embryo and of the foe­tus when still in the moth­er’s womb. It per­mits, or makes it pos­si­ble to antic­i­pate ear­li­er and more effec­tive­ly, cer­tain ther­a­peu­tic, med­ical or sur­gi­cal pro­ce­dures. Such diag­no­sis is per­mis­si­ble, with the con­sent of the par­ents after they have been ade­quate­ly informed, if the meth­ods employed safe­guard the life and integri­ty of the embryo and the moth­er, with­out sub­ject­ing them to dis­pro­por­tion­ate risks.(27) But this diag­no­sis is grave­ly opposed to the moral law when it is done with the thought of pos­si­bly induc­ing an abor­tion depend­ing upon the results: a diag­no­sis which shows the exis­tence of a mal­for­ma­tion or a hered­i­tary ill­ness must not be the equiv­a­lent of a death-sen­tence. Thus a woman would be com­mit­ting a grave­ly illic­it act if she were to request such a diag­no­sis with the delib­er­ate inten­tion of hav­ing an abor­tion should the results con­firm the exis­tence of a mal­for­ma­tion or abnor­mal­i­ty. The spouse or rel­a­tives or any­one else would sim­i­lar­ly be act­ing in a man­ner con­trary to the moral law if they were to coun­sel or impose such a diag­nos­tic pro­ce­dure on the expec­tant moth­er with the same inten­tion of pos­si­bly pro­ceed­ing to an abor­tion. So too the spe­cial­ist would be guilty of illic­it col­lab­o­ra­tion if, in con­duct­ing the diag­no­sis and in com­mu­ni­cat­ing its results, he were delib­er­ate­ly to con­tribute to estab­lish­ing or favour­ing a link between pre­na­tal diag­no­sis and abor­tion. In con­clu­sion, any direc­tive or pro­gramme of the civ­il and health author­i­ties or of sci­en­tif­ic orga­ni­za­tions which in any way were to favour a link between pre­na­tal diag­no­sis and abor­tion, or which were to go as far as direct­ly to induce expec­tant moth­ers to sub­mit to pre­na­tal diag­no­sis planned for the pur­pose of elim­i­nat­ing foe­tus­es which are affect­ed by mal­for­ma­tions or which are car­ri­ers of hered­i­tary ill­ness, is to be con­demned as a vio­la­tion of the unborn child’s right to life and as an abuse of the pri­or rights and duties of the spouses, 

3. ARE THERAPEUTIC PROCEDURES CARRIED OUT ON THE HUMAN EMBRYO LICIT? 

As with all med­ical inter­ven­tions on patients, one must uphold as lic­it pro­ce­dures car­ried out on the human embryo which respect the life and integri­ty of the embryo and do not involve dis­pro­por­tion­ate risks for it but are direct­ed towards its heal­ing, the improve­ment of its con­di­tion of health, or its indi­vid­ual sur­vival. What­ev­er the type of med­ical, sur­gi­cal or oth­er ther­a­py, the free and informed con­sent of the par­ents is required, accord­ing to the deon­to­log­i­cal rules fol­lowed in the case of chil­dren. The appli­ca­tion of this moral prin­ci­ple may call for del­i­cate and par­tic­u­lar pre­cau­tions in the case of embry­on­ic or foetal life. The legit­i­ma­cy and cri­te­ria of such pro­ce­dures have been clear­ly stat­ed by Pope John Paul II: “A strict­ly ther­a­peu­tic inter­ven­tion whose explic­it objec­tive is the heal­ing of var­i­ous mal­adies such as those stem­ming from chro­mo­so­mal defects will, in prin­ci­ple, be con­sid­ered desir­able, pro­vid­ed it is direct­ed to the true pro­mo­tion of the per­son­al well-being of the indi­vid­ual with­out doing harm to his integri­ty or wors­en­ing his con­di­tions of life. Such an inter­ven­tion would indeed fall with­in the log­ic of the Chris­t­ian moral tra­di­tion” (28)

4. HOW IS ONE TO EVALUATE MORALLY RESEARCH AND EXPERIMENTATION* ON HUMAN EMBRYOS AND FOETUSES? 

Med­ical research must refrain from oper­a­tions on live embryos, unless there is a moral cer­tain­ty of not caus­ing harm to the life or integri­ty of the unborn child and the moth­er, and on con­di­tion that the par­ents have givers their free and in formed con­sent to the pro­ce­dure. It fol­lows that all research, even when lim­it­ed to the sim­ple obser­va­tion of the embryo, would become illic­it were it to involve risk to the embry­o’s phys­i­cal integri­ty or life by rea­son of the meth­ods used or the effects induced. As regards exper­i­men­ta­tion, and pre­sup­pos­ing the gen­er­al dis­tinc­tion between experi;‘nentation for pur­pos­es which are not direct­ly ther­a­peu­tic and exper­i­men­ta­tion which is clear­ly ther­a­peu­tic for the sub­ject him­self, in the case in point one must also dis­tin­guish between exper­i­men­ta­tion car­ried out on embryos which are still alive and exper­i­men­ta­tion car­ried out on embryos which are dead. If the embryos are liv­ing, whether viable or not, they must be respect­ed just like any oth­er human per­son; exper­i­men­ta­tion on embryos which is not direct­ly ther­a­peu­tic is illic­it.(29) No objec­tive, even though noble in itself, such as a fore­see­able advan­tage to sci­ence, to oth­er human beings or to soci­ety, can in any way jus­ti­fy exper­i­men­ta­tion on liv­ing human embryos or foe­tus­es, whether viable or not, either inside or out­side the moth­er’s womb. The informed con­sent ordi­nar­i­ly required for clin­i­cal exper­i­men­ta­tion on adults can­not be grant­ed by the par­ents, who may not freely dis­pose of the phys­i­cal integri­ty or life of the unborn child. More­over, exper­i­men­ta­tion on embryos and foe­tus­es always involves risk, and indeed in most cas­es it involves the cer­tain expec­ta­tion of harm to their phys­i­cal integri­ty or even their death. To use human embryos or foe­tus­es as the object or instru­ment of exper­i­men­ta­tion con­sti­tutes a crime against their dig­ni­ty as human beings hav­ing a right to the same respect that is due to the child already born and to every human person. 

The Char­ter of the Rights of the Fam­i­ly pub­lished by the Holy See affirms: “Respect for the dig­ni­ty of the human being excludes all exper­i­men­tal manip­u­la­tion or exploita­tion of the human embryo”.(30) The prac­tice of keep­ing alive human embryos in vivo or in vit­ro for exper­i­men­tal or com­mer­cial pur­pos­es is total­ly opposed to human dig­ni­ty. In the case of exper­i­men­ta­tion that is clear­ly ther­a­peu­tic, name­ly, when it is a mat­ter of exper­i­men­tal forms of ther­a­py used for the ben­e­fit of the embryo itself in a final attempt to save its life, and in the absence of oth­er reli­able forms of ther­a­py, recourse to drugs or pro­ce­dures not yet ful­ly test­ed can be lic­it (31)

The corpses of human embryos and foe­tus­es, whether they have been delib­er­ate­ly abort­ed or not, must be respect­ed just as the remains of oth­er human beings. In par­tic­u­lar, they can­not be sub­ject­ed to muti­la­tion or to autop­sies if their death has not yet been ver­i­fied and with­out the con­sent of the par­ents or of the moth­er. Fur­ther­more, the moral require­ments must be safe­guard­ed that there be no com­plic­i­ty in delib­er­ate abor­tion and that the risk of scan­dal be avoid­ed. Also, in the case of dead foe­tus­es, as for the corpses of adult per­sons, all com­mer­cial traf­fick­ing must be con­sid­ered illic­it and should be prohibited. 

* Since the terms “research” and “exper­i­men­ta­tion” are often used equiv­a­lent­ly and ambigu­ous­ly, it is deemed nec­es­sary to spec­i­fy the exact mean­ing giv­en them in this document. 

1) By research is meant any induc­tive-deduc­tive process which aims at pro­mot­ing the sys­tem­at­ic obser­va­tion of a giv­en phe­nom­e­non in the human field or at ver­i­fy­ing a hypoth­e­sis aris­ing from pre­vi­ous observations. 

2) By exper­i­men­ta­tion is meant any research in which the human being (in the var­i­ous stages of his exis­tence: embryo, foe­tus, child or adult) rep­re­sents the object through which or upon which one intends to ver­i­fy the effect, at present unknown or not suf­fi­cient­ly known, of a giv­en treat­ment (e.g. phar­ma­co­log­i­cal, ter­ato­genic, sur­gi­cal, etc.). 

5. HOW IS ONE TO EVALUATE MORALLY THE USE FOR RESEARCH PURPOSES OF EMBRYOS OBTAINED BY FERTILIZATION ‘IN VITRO’? 

Human embryos obtained in vit­ro are human beings and sub­jects with rights: their dig­ni­ty and right to life must be respect­ed from the first moment of their exis­tence. It is immoral to pro­duce human embryos des­tined to be exploit­ed as dis­pos­able “bio­log­i­cal mate­r­i­al”. In the usu­al prac­tice of in vit­ro fer­til­iza­tion, not all of the embryos are trans­ferred to the wom­an’s body; some are destroyed. Just as the Church con­demns induced abor­tion, so she also for­bids acts against the life of these human beings. It is a duty to con­demn the par­tic­u­lar grav­i­ty of the vol­un­tary destruc­tion of human embryos obtained ‘in vit­ro’ for the sole pur­pose of research, either by means of arti­fi­cial insem­i­na­tion of by means of “twin fis­sion”. By act­ing in this way the researcher usurps the place of God; and, even though he may be unaware of this, he sets him­self up as the mas­ter of the des­tiny of oth­ers inas­much as he arbi­trar­i­ly choos­es whom he will allow to live and whom he will send to death and kills defence­less human beings. 

Meth­ods of obser­va­tion or exper­i­men­ta­tion which dam­age or impose grave and dis­pro­por­tion­ate risks upon embryos obtained in vit­ro are moral­ly illic­it for the same rea­sons. every human being is to be respect­ed for him­self, and can­not be reduced in worth to a pure and sim­ple instru­ment for the advan­tage of oth­ers. It is there­fore not in con­for­mi­ty with the moral law delib­er­ate­ly to expose to death human embryos obtained ‘in vit­ro’. In con­se­quence of the fact that they have been pro­duced in vit­ro, those embryos which art not trans­ferred into the body of the moth­er and are called “spare” are exposed to an absurd fate, with no pos­si­bil­i­ty of their being offered safe means of sur­vival which can be lic­it­ly pursued. 

6. WHAT JUDGMENT SHOULD BE MADE ON OTHER PROCEDURES OF MANIPULATING EMBRYOS CONNECTED WITH THE “TECHNIQUES OF HUMAN REPRODUCTION”? 

Tech­niques of fer­til­iza­tion in vit­ro can open the way to oth­er forms of bio­log­i­cal and genet­ic manip­u­la­tion of human embryos, such as attempts or plans for fer­til­iza­tion between human and ani­mal gametes and the ges­ta­tion of human embryos in the uterus of ani­mals, or the hypoth­e­sis or project of con­struct­ing arti­fi­cial uterus­es for the human embryo. These pro­ce­dures are con­trary to the human dig­ni­ty prop­er to the embryo, and at the same time they are con­trary to the right of every per­son to be con­ceived and to be born with­in mar­riage and from mar­riage.(32) Also, attempts or hypothe­ses for obtain­ing a human being with­out any con­nec­tion with sex­u­al­i­ty through “twin fis­sion”, cloning or partheno­gen­e­sis are to be con­sid­ered con­trary to the moral law, since they are in oppo­si­tion to the dig­ni­ty both of human pro­cre­ation and of the con­ju­gal union. 

The freez­ing of embryos, even when car­ried out in order to pre­serve the life of an embryo — cry­op­reser­va­tion — con­sti­tutes an offence against the respect due to human beings by expos­ing them to grave risks of death or harm to their phys­i­cal integri­ty and depriv­ing them, at least tem­porar­i­ly, of mater­nal shel­ter and ges­ta­tion, thus plac­ing them in a sit­u­a­tion in which fur­ther offences and manip­u­la­tion are possible. 

Cer­tain attempts to influ­ence chro­mo­som­ic or genet­ic inher­i­tance are not ther­a­peu­tic but are aimed at pro­duc­ing human beings select­ed accord­ing to sex or oth­er pre­de­ter­mined qual­i­ties. These manip­u­la­tions are con­trary to the per­son­al dig­ni­ty of the human being and his or her integri­ty and iden­ti­ty. There­fore in no way can they be jus­ti­fied on the grounds of pos­si­ble ben­e­fi­cial con­se­quences for future human­i­ty. (33) Every per­son must be respect­ed for him­self: in this con­sists the dig­ni­ty and right of every human being from his or her beginning. 

II. INTERVENTIONS UPON HUMAN PROCREATION 

By “arti­fi­cial pro­cre­ation” or ” arti­fi­cial fer­til­iza­tion” are under­stood here the dif­fer­ent tech­ni­cal pro­ce­dures direct­ed towards obtain­ing a human con­cep­tion in a man­ner oth­er than the sex­u­al union of man and woman. This Instruc­tion deals with fer­til­iza­tion of an ovum in a test-tube (in vit­ro fer­til­iza­tion) and arti­fi­cial insem­i­na­tion through trans­fer into the wom­an’s gen­i­tal tracts of pre­vi­ous­ly col­lect­ed sperm. 

A pre­lim­i­nary point for the moral eval­u­a­tion of such tech­ni­cal pro­ce­dures is con­sti­tut­ed by the con­sid­er­a­tion of the cir­cum­stances and con­se­quences which those pro­ce­dures involve in rela­tion to the respect due the human embryo. Devel­op­ment of the prac­tice of in vit­rofer­til­iza­tion has required innu­mer­able fer­til­iza­tions and destruc­tions of human embryos. Even today, the usu­al prac­tice pre­sup­pos­es a hyper­ovu­la­tion on the part of the woman: a num­ber of ova are with­drawn, fer­til­ized and then cul­ti­vat­ed in vit­ro for some days. Usu­al­ly not all are trans­ferred into the gen­i­tal tracts of the woman; some embryos, gen­er­al­ly called “spare “, are destroyed or frozen. On occa­sion, some of the implant­ed embryos are sac­ri­ficed for var­i­ous eugenic, eco­nom­ic or psy­cho­log­i­cal rea­sons. Such delib­er­ate destruc­tion of human beings or their uti­liza­tion for dif­fer­ent pur­pos­es to the detri­ment of their integri­ty and life is con­trary to the doc­trine on pro­cured abor­tion already recalled. The con­nec­tion between in vit­ro fer­til­iza­tion and the vol­un­tary destruc­tion of human embryos occurs too often. This is sig­nif­i­cant: through these pro­ce­dures, with appar­ent­ly con­trary pur­pos­es, life and death are sub­ject­ed to the deci­sion of man, who thus sets him­self up as the giv­er of life and death by decree. This dynam­ic of vio­lence and dom­i­na­tion may remain unno­ticed by those very indi­vid­u­als who, in wish­ing to uti­lize this pro­ce­dure, become sub­ject to it them­selves. The facts record­ed and the cold log­ic which links them must be tak­en into con­sid­er­a­tion for a moral judg­ment on IVF and ET (in vit­ro fer­til­iza­tion and embryo trans­fer): the abor­tion-men­tal­i­ty which has made this pro­ce­dure pos­si­ble thus leads, whether one wants it or not, to man’s dom­i­na­tion over the life and death of his fel­low human beings and can lead to a sys­tem of rad­i­cal eugenics. 

Nev­er­the­less, such abus­es do not exempt one from a fur­ther and thor­ough eth­i­cal study of the tech­niques of arti­fi­cial pro­cre­ation con­sid­ered in them­selves, abstract­ing as far as pos­si­ble from the destruc­tion of embryos pro­duced in vit­ro. The present Instruc­tion will there­fore take into con­sid­er­a­tion in the first place the prob­lems posed by het­erol­o­gous arti­fi­cial fer­til­iza­tion (II, 1–3), * and sub­se­quent­ly those linked with homol­o­gous arti­fi­cial fer­til­iza­tion (II, 4–6 ) .** Before for­mu­lat­ing an eth­i­cal judg­ment on each of these pro­ce­dures, the prin­ci­ples and val­ues which deter­mine the moral eval­u­a­tion of each of them will be considered. 

* By the term het­erol­o­gous arti­fi­cial fer­til­iza­tion or pro­cre­ation, the Instruc­tion means tech­niques used to obtain a human con­cep­tion arti­fi­cial­ly by the use of gametes com­ing from at least one donor oth­er than the spous­es who are joined in mar­riage. Such tech­niques can be of two types 

a) Het­erol­o­gous IVF and ET: the tech­nique used to obtain a human con­cep­tion through the meet­ing in vit­ro of gametes tak­en from at least one donor oth­er than the two spous­es joined in marriage. 

b) Het­erol­o­gous artif­i­cal insem­i­na­tion: the tech­nique used to obtain a human con­cep­tion through the trans­fer into the gen­i­tal tracts of the woman of the sperm pre­vi­ous­ly col­lect­ed from a donor oth­er than the husband. 

** By arti­fi­cial homol­o­gous fer­til­iza­tion or pro­cre­ation, the Instruc­tion means the tech­nique used to obtain a human con­cep­tion using the gametes of the two spous­es joined in mar­riage. Homol­o­gous arti­fi­cial fer­til­iza­tion can be car­ried out by two dif­fer­ent methods:

a) Homol­o­gous IVF and ET: the tech­nique used to obtain a human con­cep­tion through the meet­ing in vit­ro of the gametes of the spous­es joined in marriage. 

b) Homol­o­gous arti­fi­cial insem­i­na­tion: the tech­nique used to obtain a human con­cep­tion through the trans­fer into the gen­i­tal tracts of a mar­ried woman of the sperm pre­vi­ous­ly col­lect­ed from her husband. 

A. HETEROLOGOUS ARTIFICIAL FERTILIZATION

1. WHY MUST HUMAN PROCREATION TAKE PLACE IN MARRIAGE? 

Every human being is always to be accept­ed as a gift and bless­ing of God. How­ev­er, from the moral point of view a tru­ly respon­si­ble pro­cre­ation vis-à-vis the unborn child must be the fruit of marriage. 

For human pro­cre­ation has spe­cif­ic char­ac­ter­is­tics by virtue of the per­son­al dig­ni­ty of the par­ents and of the chil­dren: the pro­cre­ation of a new per­son, where­by the man and the woman col­lab­o­rate with the pow­er of the Cre­ator, must be the fruit and the sign of the mutu­al self-giv­ing of the spous­es, of their love and of their fidelity.(34) The fideli­ty of the spous­es in the uni­ty of mar­riage involves rec­i­p­ro­cal respect of their right to become a father and a moth­er only through each oth­er. The child has the right to be con­ceived, car­ried in the womb, brought into the world and brought up with­in mar­riage: it is through the secure and rec­og­nized rela­tion­ship to his own par­ents that the child can dis­cov­er his own iden­ti­ty and achieve his own prop­er human devel­op­ment. The par­ents find in their child a con­fir­ma­tion and com­ple­tion of their rec­i­p­ro­cal self-giv­ing: the child is the liv­ing image of their love, the per­ma­nent sign of their con­ju­gal union, the liv­ing and indis­sol­u­ble con­crete expres­sion of their pater­ni­ty and mater­ni­ty, (35) By rea­son of the voca­tion and social respon­si­bil­i­ties of the per­son, the good of the chil­dren and of the par­ents con­tributes to the good of civ­il soci­ety; the vital­i­ty and sta­bil­i­ty of soci­ety require that chil­dren come into the world with­in a fam­i­ly and that the fam­i­ly be firm­ly based on mar­riage. The tra­di­tion of the Church and anthro­po­log­i­cal reflec­tion rec­og­nize in mar­riage and in its indis­sol­u­ble uni­ty the only set­ting wor­thy of tru­ly respon­si­ble procreation. 

2. DOES HETEROLOGOUS ARTIFICIAL FERTILIZATION CONFORM TO THE DIGNITY OF THE COUPLE AND TO THE TRUTH OF MARRIAGE? 

Through IVF and ET and het­erol­o­gous arti­fi­cial insem­i­na­tion, human con­cep­tion is achieved through the fusion of gametes of at least one donor oth­er than the spous­es who are unit­ed in mar­riage. Het­erol­o­gous arti­fi­cial fer­til­iza­tion is con­trary to the uni­ty of mar­riage, to the dig­ni­ty of the spous­es, to the voca­tion prop­er to par­ents, and to the child’s right to be con­ceived and brought into the world in mar­riage and from mar­riage.(36) Respect for the uni­ty of mar­riage and for con­ju­gal fideli­ty demands that the child be con­ceived in mar­riage; the bond exist­ing between hus­band and wife accords the spous­es, in an objec­tive and inalien­able man­ner, the exclu­sive right to become father and moth­er sole­ly through each other.(37) Recourse to the gametes of a third per­son, in order to have sperm or ovum avail­able, con­sti­tutes a vio­la­tion of the rec­i­p­ro­cal com­mit­ment of the spous­es and a grave lack in regard to that essen­tial prop­er­ty of mar­riage which is its uni­ty. Het­erol­o­gous arti­fi­cial fer­til­iza­tion vio­lates the rights of the child; it deprives him of his fil­ial rela­tion­ship with his parental ori­gins and can hin­der the matur­ing of his per­son­al iden­ti­ty. Fur­ther­more, it offends the com­mon voca­tion of the spous­es who are called to father­hood and moth­er­hood: it objec­tive­ly deprives con­ju­gal fruit­ful­ness of its uni­ty and integri­ty; it brings about and man­i­fests a rup­ture between genet­ic par­ent­hood, ges­ta­tion­al par­ent­hood and respon­si­bil­i­ty for upbring­ing. Such dam­age to the per­son­al rela­tion­ships with­in the fam­i­ly has reper­cus­sions on civ­il soci­ety: what threat­ens the uni­ty and sta­bil­i­ty of the fam­i­ly is a source of dis­sen­sion, dis­or­der and injus­tice in the whole of social life. These rea­sons lead to a neg­a­tive moral judg­ment con­cern­ing het­erol­o­gous arti­fi­cial fer­til­iza­tion: con­se­quent­ly fer­til­iza­tion of a mar­ried woman with the sperm of a donor dif­fer­ent from her hus­band and fer­til­iza­tion with the hus­band’s sperm of an ovum not com­ing from his wife are moral­ly illic­it. Fur­ther­more, the arti­fi­cial fer­til­iza­tion of a woman who is unmar­ried or a wid­ow, who­ev­er the donor may be, can­not be moral­ly justified.

The desire to have a child and the love between spous­es who long to obvi­ate a steril­i­ty which can­not be over­come in any oth­er way con­sti­tute under­stand­able moti­va­tions; but sub­jec­tive­ly good inten­tions do not ren­der het­erol­o­gous arti­fi­cial fer­til­iza­tion con­formable to the objec­tive and inalien­able prop­er­ties of mar­riage or respect­ful of the rights of the child and of the spouses. 

3. IS “SURROGATE”* MOTHERHOOD MORALLY LICIT? 

No, for the same rea­sons which lead one to reject het­erol­o­gous arti­fi­cial fer­til­iza­tion: for it is con­trary to the uni­ty of mar­riage and to the dig­ni­ty of the pro­cre­ation of the human per­son. Sur­ro­gate moth­er­hood rep­re­sents an objec­tive fail­ure to meet the oblig­a­tions of mater­nal love, of con­ju­gal fideli­ty and of respon­si­ble moth­er­hood; it offends the dig­ni­ty and the right of the child to be con­ceived, car­ried in the womb, brought into the world and brought up by his own par­ents; it sets up, to the detri­ment of fam­i­lies, a divi­sion between the phys­i­cal, psy­cho­log­i­cal and moral ele­ments which con­sti­tute those families. 

* By “sur­ro­gate moth­er” the Instruc­tion means: 

a) the woman who car­ries in preg­nan­cy an embryo implant­ed in her uterus and who is genet­i­cal­ly a stranger to the embryo because it has been obtained through the union of the gametes of “donors”. She car­ries the preg­nan­cy with a pledge to sur­ren­der the baby once it is born to the par­ty who com­mis­sioned or made the agree­ment for the pregnancy. 

b) the woman who car­ries in preg­nan­cy an embryo to whose pro­cre­ation she has con­tributed the dona­tion of her own ovum, fer­til­ized through insem­i­na­tion with the sperm of a man oth­er than her hus­band. She car­ries the preg­nan­cy with a pledge to sur­ren­der the child once it is born to the par­ty who com­mis­sioned or made the agree­ment for the pregnancy. 

B. HOMOLOGOUS ARTIFICIAL FERTILIZATION 

Since het­erol­o­gous arti­fi­cial fer­til­iza­tion has been declared unac­cept­able, the ques­tion aris­es of how to eval­u­ate moral­ly the process of homol­o­gous arti­fi­cial fer­til­iza­tion: IVF and ET and arti­fi­cial insem­i­na­tion between hus­band and wife. First a ques­tion of prin­ci­ple must be clarified. 

4. WHAT CONNECTION IS REQUIRED FROM THE MORAL POINT OF VIEW BETWEEN PROCREATION AND THE CONJUGAL ACT?

a) The Church’s teach­ing on mar­riage and human pro­cre­ation affirms the “insep­a­ra­ble con­nec­tion, willed by God and unable to be bro­ken by man on his own ini­tia­tive, between the two mean­ings of the con­ju­gal act: the uni­tive mean­ing and the pro­cre­ative mean­ing. Indeed, by its inti­mate struc­ture, the con­ju­gal act, while most close­ly unit­ing hus­band and wife, capac­i­tates them for the gen­er­a­tion of new lives, accord­ing to laws inscribed in the very being of man and of woman”.(38) This prin­ci­ple, which is based upon the nature of mar­riage and the inti­mate con­nec­tion of the goods of mar­riage, has well-known con­se­quences on the lev­el of respon­si­ble father­hood and moth­er­hood. “By safe­guard­ing both these essen­tial aspects, the uni­tive and the pro­cre­ative, the con­ju­gal act pre­serves in its full­ness the sense of true mutu­al love and its ordi­na­tion towards man’s exalt­ed voca­tion to parenthood”.(39) The same doc­trine con­cern­ing the link between the mean­ings of the con­ju­gal act and between the goods of mar­riage throws light on the moral prob­lem of homol­o­gous arti­fi­cial fer­til­iza­tion, since “it is nev­er per­mit­ted to sep­a­rate these dif­fer­ent aspects to such a degree as pos­i­tive­ly to exclude either the pro­cre­ative inten­tion or the con­ju­gal rela­tion” (40) Con­tra­cep­tion delib­er­ate­ly deprives the con­ju­gal act of its open­ness to pro­cre­ation and in this way brings about a vol­un­tary dis­so­ci­a­tion of the ends of mar­riage. Homol­o­gous arti­fi­cial fer­til­iza­tion, in seek­ing a pro­cre­ation which is not the fruit of a spe­cif­ic act of con­ju­gal union, objec­tive­ly effects an anal­o­gous sep­a­ra­tion between the goods and the mean­ings of mar­riage. Thus, fer­til­iza­tion is lic­it­ly sought when it is the result of a “con­ju­gal act which is per se suit­able for the gen­er­a­tion of chil­dren to which mar­riage is ordered by its nature and by which the spous­es become one flesh”.(41) But from the moral point of view pro­cre­ation is deprived of its prop­er per­fec­tion when it is not desired as the fruit of the con­ju­gal act, that is to say of the spe­cif­ic act of the spous­es’ union.

b ) The moral val­ue of the inti­mate link between the goods of mar­riage and between the mean­ings of the con­ju­gal act is based upon the uni­ty of the human being, a uni­ty involv­ing body and spir­i­tu­al soul. (42) Spous­es mutu­al­ly express their per­son­al love in the “lan­guage of the body “, which clear­ly involves both “spon­sal mean­ings” and parental ones.(43) The con­ju­gal act by which the cou­ple mutu­al­ly express their self-gift at the same time express­es open­ness to the gift of life. It is an act that is insep­a­ra­bly cor­po­ral and spir­i­tu­al. It is in their bod­ies and through their bod­ies that the spous­es con­sum­mate their mar­riage and are able to become father and moth­er. In order to respect the lan­guage of their bod­ies and their nat­ur­al gen­eros­i­ty, the con­ju­gal union must take place with respect for its open­ness to pro­cre­ation; and the pro­cre­ation of a per­son must be the fruit and the result of mar­ried love. The ori­gin of the human being thus fol­lows from a pro­cre­ation that is “linked to the union, not only bio­log­i­cal but also spir­i­tu­al, of the par­ents, made one by the bond of marriage”.(44) Fer­til­iza­tion achieved out­side the bod­ies of the cou­ple remains by this very fact deprived of the mean­ings and the val­ues which are expressed in the lan­guage of the body and in the union of human persons. 

c) Only respect for the link between the mean­ings of the con­ju­gal act and respect for the uni­ty of the human being make pos­si­ble pro­cre­ation in con­for­mi­ty with the dig­ni­ty of the per­son. In his unique and irre­peat­able ori­gin, the child must be respect­ed and rec­og­nized as equal in per­son­al dig­ni­ty to those who give him life. The human per­son must be accept­ed in his par­ents’ act of union and love; the gen­er­a­tion of a child must there­fore be the fruit of that mutu­al giv­ing (45) which is real­ized in the con­ju­gal act where­in the spous­es coop­er­ate as ser­vants and not as mas­ters in the work of the Cre­ator who is Love. In real­i­ty, the ori­gin of a human per­son is the result of an act of giv­ing. The one con­ceived must be the fruit of his par­ents’ love. He can­not be desired or con­ceived as the prod­uct of an inter­ven­tion of med­ical or bio­log­i­cal tech­niques; that would be equiv­a­lent to reduc­ing him to an object of sci­en­tif­ic tech­nol­o­gy. No one may sub­ject the com­ing of a child into the world to con­di­tions of tech­ni­cal effi­cien­cy which are to be eval­u­at­ed accord­ing to stan­dards of con­trol and domin­ion. The moral rel­e­vance of the link between the mean­ings of the con­ju­gal act and between the goods of mar­riage, as well as the uni­ty of the human being and the dig­ni­ty of his ori­gin, demand that the pro­cre­ation of a human per­son be brought about as the fruit of the con­ju­gal act spe­cif­ic to the love between spous­es.The link between pro­cre­ation and the con­ju­gal act is thus shown to be of great impor­tance on the anthro­po­log­i­cal and moral planes, and it throws light on the posi­tions of the Mag­is­teri­um with regard to homol­o­gous arti­fi­cial fertilization. 

5. IS HOMOLOGOUS ‘IN VITRO’ FERTILIZATION MORALLY LICIT? 

The answer to this ques­tion is strict­ly depen­dent on the prin­ci­ples just men­tioned. Cer­tain­ly one can­not ignore the legit­i­mate aspi­ra­tions of ster­ile cou­ples. For some, recourse to homol­o­gous IVF and ET appears to be the only way of ful­fill­ing their sin­cere desire for a child. The ques­tion is asked whether the total­i­ty of con­ju­gal life in such sit­u­a­tions is not suf­fi­cient to ensure the dig­ni­ty prop­er to human pro­cre­ation. It is acknowl­edged that IVF and ET cer­tain­ly can­not sup­ply for the absence of sex­u­al rela­tions (47) and can­not be pre­ferred to the spe­cif­ic acts of con­ju­gal union, giv­en the risks involved for the child and the dif­fi­cul­ties of the pro­ce­dure. But it is asked whether, when there is no oth­er way of over­com­ing the steril­i­ty which is a source of suf­fer­ing, homol­o­gous in vit­ro fer­til­iza­tion may not con­sti­tute an aid, if not a form of ther­a­py, where­by its moral lic­it­ness could be admit­ted. The desire for a child — or at the very least an open­ness to the trans­mis­sion of life — is a nec­es­sary pre­req­ui­site from the moral point of view for respon­si­ble human pro­cre­ation. But this good inten­tion is not suf­fi­cient for mak­ing a pos­i­tive moral eval­u­a­tion of in vit­ro fer­til­iza­tion between spous­es. The process of IVF and ET must be judged in itself and can­not bor­row its defin­i­tive moral qual­i­ty from the total­i­ty of con­ju­gal life of which it becomes part nor from the con­ju­gal acts which may pre­cede or fol­low it.(48)

It has already been recalled that, in the cir­cum­stances in which it is reg­u­lar­ly prac­tised, IVF and ET involves the destruc­tion of human beings, which is some­thing con­trary to the doc­trine on the illic­it­ness of abor­tion pre­vi­ous­ly mentioned.(49) But even in a sit­u­a­tion in which every pre­cau­tion were tak­en to avoid the death of human embryos, homol­o­gous IVF and ET dis­so­ci­ates from the con­ju­gal act the actions which are direct­ed to human fer­til­iza­tion. For this rea­son the very nature of homol­o­gous IVF and ET also must be tak­en into account, even abstract­ing from the link with pro­cured abor­tion. Homol­o­gous IVF and ET is brought about out­side the bod­ies of the cou­ple through actions of third par­ties whose com­pe­tence and tech­ni­cal activ­i­ty deter­mine the suc­cess of the pro­ce­dure. Such fer­til­iza­tion entrusts the life and iden­ti­ty of the embryo into the pow­er of doc­tors and biol­o­gists and estab­lish­es the dom­i­na­tion of tech­nol­o­gy over the ori­gin and des­tiny of the human per­son. Such a rela­tion­ship of dom­i­na­tion is in itself con­trary to the dig­ni­ty and equal­i­ty that must be com­mon to par­ents and children. 

Con­cep­tion in vit­ro is the result of the tech­ni­cal action which pre­sides over fer­til­iza­tion. Such fer­til­iza­tion is nei­ther in fact achieved nor pos­i­tive­ly willed as the expres­sion and fruit of a spe­cif­ic act of the con­ju­gal union. In homol­o­gous IVF and ET, there­fore, even if it is con­sid­ered in the con­text of ‘de fac­to’ exist­ing sex­u­al rela­tions, the gen­er­a­tion of the human per­son is objec­tive­ly deprived of its prop­er per­fec­tion: name­ly, that of being the result and fruit of a con­ju­gal act in which the spous­es can become “coop­er­a­tors with God for giv­ing life to a new person”.(50) These rea­sons enable us to under­stand why the act of con­ju­gal love is con­sid­ered in the teach­ing of the Church as the only set­ting wor­thy of human pro­cre­ation. For the same rea­sons the so-called “sim­ple case”, i.e. a homol­o­gous IVF and ET pro­ce­dure that is free of any com­pro­mise with the abortive prac­tice of destroy­ing embryos and with mas­tur­ba­tion, remains a tech­nique which is moral­ly illic­it because it deprives human pro­cre­ation of the dig­ni­ty which is prop­er and con­nat­ur­al to it. Cer­tain­ly, homol­o­gous IVF and ET fer­til­iza­tion is not marked by all that eth­i­cal neg­a­tiv­i­ty found in extra-con­ju­gal pro­cre­ation; the fam­i­ly and mar­riage con­tin­ue to con­sti­tute the set­ting for the birth and upbring­ing of the chil­dren. Nev­er­the­less, in con­for­mi­ty with the tra­di­tion­al doc­trine relat­ing to the goods of mar­riage and the dig­ni­ty of the per­son, the Church remain opposed from the moral point of view to homol­o­gous ‘in vit­ro’ fer­til­iza­tion. Such fer­til­iza­tion is in itself illic­it and in oppo­si­tion to the dig­ni­ty of pro­cre­ation and of the con­ju­gal union, even when every­thing is done to avoid the death of the human embryo. Although the man­ner in which human con­cep­tion is achieved with IVF and ET can­not be approved, every child which comes into the world must in any case be accept­ed as a liv­ing gift of the divine Good­ness and must be brought up with love. 

6. HOW IS HOMOLOGOUS ARTIFICIAL INSEMINATION TO BE EVALUATED FROM THE MORAL POINT OF VIEW? 

Homol­o­gous arti­fi­cial insem­i­na­tion with­in mar­riage can­not be admit­ted except for those cas­es in which the tech­ni­cal means is not a sub­sti­tute for the con­ju­gal act but serves to facil­i­tate and to help so that the act attains its nat­ur­al purpose.

The teach­ing of the Mag­is­teri­um on this point has already been stated.(51) This teach­ing is not just an expres­sion of par­tic­u­lar his­tor­i­cal cir­cum­stances but is based on the Church’s doc­trine con­cern­ing the con­nec­tion between the con­ju­gal union and pro­cre­ation and on a con­sid­er­a­tion of the per­son­al nature of the con­ju­gal act and of human pro­cre­ation. “In its nat­ur­al struc­ture, the con­ju­gal act is a per­son­al action, a simul­ta­ne­ous and imme­di­ate coop­er­a­tion on the part of the hus­band and wife, which by the very nature of the agents and the prop­er nature of the act is the expres­sion of the mutu­al gift which, accord­ing to the words of Scrip­ture, brings about union ‘in one flesh’ “.(52) Thus moral con­science “does not nec­es­sar­i­ly pro­scribe the use of cer­tain arti­fi­cial means des­tined sole­ly either to the facil­i­tat­ing of the nat­ur­al act or to ensur­ing that the nat­ur­al act nor­mal­ly per­formed achieves its prop­er end”.(53) If the tech­ni­cal means facil­i­tates the con­ju­gal act or helps it to reach its nat­ur­al objec­tives, it can be moral­ly accept­able. If, on the oth­er hand, the pro­ce­dure were to replace the con­ju­gal act, it is moral­ly illic­it. Arti­fi­cial insem­i­na­tion as a sub­sti­tute for the con­ju­gal act is pro­hib­it­ed by rea­son of the vol­un­tar­i­ly achieved dis­so­ci­a­tion of the two mean­ings of the con­ju­gal act. Mas­tur­ba­tion, through which the sperm is nor­mal­ly obtained, is anoth­er sign of this dis­so­ci­a­tion: even when it is done for the pur­pose of pro­cre­ation, the act remains deprived of its uni­tive mean­ing: “It lacks the sex­u­al rela­tion­ship called for by the moral order, name­ly the rela­tion­ship which real­izes ‘the full sense of mutu­al self-giv­ing and human pro­cre­ation in the con­text of true love’ “.(54)

7. WHAT MORAL CRITERION CAN BE PROPOSED WITH REGARD TO MEDICAL INTERVENTION IN HUMAN PROCREATION? 

The med­ical act must be eval­u­at­ed not only with ref­er­ence to its tech­ni­cal dimen­sion but also and above all in rela­tion to its goal which is the good of per­sons and their bod­i­ly and psy­cho­log­i­cal health. The moral cri­te­ria for med­ical inter­ven­tion in pro­cre­ation are deduced from the dig­ni­ty of human per­sons, of their sex­u­al­i­ty and of their ori­gin. Med­i­cine which seeks to be ordered to the inte­gral good of the per­son must respect the specif­i­cal­ly human val­ues of sexuality.(55) The doc­tor is at the ser­vice of per­sons and of human pro­cre­ation. He does not have the author­i­ty to dis­pose of them or to decide their fate.

A med­ical inter­ven­tion respects the dig­ni­ty of per­sons when it seeks to assist the con­ju­gal act either in order to facil­i­tate its per­for­mance or in order to enable it to achieve its objec­tive once it has been nor­mal­ly performed”,(56) On the oth­er hand, it some­times hap­pens that a med­ical pro­ce­dure tech­no­log­i­cal­ly replaces the con­ju­gal act in order to obtain a pro­cre­ation which is nei­ther its result nor its fruit. In this case the med­ical act is not, as it should be, at the ser­vice of con­ju­gal union but rather appro­pri­ates to itself the pro­cre­ative func­tion and thus con­tra­dicts the dig­ni­ty and the inalien­able rights of the spous­es and of the child to be born. The human­iza­tion of med­i­cine, which is insist­ed upon today by every­one, requires respect for the inte­gral dig­ni­ty of the human per­son first of all in the act and at the moment in which the spous­es trans­mit life to a new per­son. It is only log­i­cal there­fore to address an urgent appeal to Catholic doc­tors and sci­en­tists that they bear exem­plary wit­ness to the respect due to the human embryo and to the dig­ni­ty of pro­cre­ation. The med­ical and nurs­ing staff of Catholic hos­pi­tals and clin­ics are in a spe­cial way urged to do jus­tice to the moral oblig­a­tions which they have assumed, fre­quent­ly also, as part of their con­tract. Those who are in charge of Catholic hos­pi­tals and clin­ics and who are often Reli­gious will take spe­cial care to safe­guard and pro­mote a dili­gent obser­vance of the moral norms recalled in the present Instruction. 

8. THE SUFFERING CAUSED BY INFERTILITY IN MARRIAGE 

The suf­fer­ing of spous­es who can­not have chil­dren or who are afraid of bring­ing a hand­i­capped child into the world is a suf­fer­ing that every­one must under­stand and prop­er­ly evaluate. 

On the part of the spous­es, the desire for a child is nat­ur­al: it express­es the voca­tion to father­hood and moth­er­hood inscribed in con­ju­gal love. This desire can be even stronger if the cou­ple is affect­ed by steril­i­ty which appears incur­able. Nev­er­the­less, mar­riage does not con­fer upon the spous­es the right to have a child, but only the right to per­form those nat­ur­al acts which are per se ordered to procreation.(57) A true and prop­er right to a child would be con­trary to the child’s dig­ni­ty and nature. The child is not an object to which one has a right, nor can he be con­sid­ered as an object of own­er­ship: rather, a child is a gift, “the supreme gift” (58) and the most gra­tu­itous gift of mar­riage, and is a liv­ing tes­ti­mo­ny of the mutu­al giv­ing of his par­ents. For this rea­son, the child has the right, as already men­tioned, to be the fruit of the spe­cif­ic act of the con­ju­gal love of his par­ents; and he also has the right to be respect­ed as a per­son from the moment of his conception.

Nev­er­the­less, what­ev­er its cause or prog­no­sis, steril­i­ty is cer­tain­ly a dif­fi­cult tri­al. The com­mu­ni­ty of believ­ers is called to shed light upon and sup­port the suf­fer­ing of those who are unable to ful­fill their legit­i­mate aspi­ra­tion to moth­er­hood and father­hood. Spous­es who find them­selves in this sad sit­u­a­tion are called to find in it an oppor­tu­ni­ty for shar­ing in a par­tic­u­lar way in the Lord’s Cross, the source of spir­i­tu­al fruit­ful­ness. Ster­ile cou­ples must not for­get that “even when pro­cre­ation is not pos­si­ble, con­ju­gal life does not for this rea­son lose its val­ue. Phys­i­cal steril­i­ty in fact can be for spous­es the occa­sion for oth­er impor­tant ser­vices to the life of the human per­son, for exam­ple, adop­tion, var­i­ous forms of edu­ca­tion­al work, and assis­tance to oth­er fam­i­lies and to poor or hand­i­capped children”.(59) Many researchers are engaged in the fight against steril­i­ty. While ful­ly safe­guard­ing the dig­ni­ty of human pro­cre­ation, some have achieved results which pre­vi­ous­ly seemed unat­tain­able. Sci­en­tists there­fore are to be encour­aged to con­tin­ue their research with the aim of pre­vent­ing the caus­es of steril­i­ty and of being able to rem­e­dy them so that ster­ile cou­ples will be able to pro­cre­ate in full respect for their own per­son­al dig­ni­ty and that of the child to be born. 

III. MORAL AND CIVIL LAW 

THE VALUES AND MORAL OBLIGATIONS
THAT CIVIL LEGISLATION
MUST RESPECT AND SANCTION IN THIS MATTER 

The invi­o­lable right to life of every inno­cent human indi­vid­ual and the rights of the fam­i­ly and of the insti­tu­tion of mar­riage con­sti­tute fun­da­men­tal moral val­ues, because they con­cern the nat­ur­al con­di­tion and inte­gral voca­tion of the human per­son; at the same time they are con­sti­tu­tive ele­ments of civ­il soci­ety and its order. For this rea­son the new tech­no­log­i­cal pos­si­bil­i­ties which have opened up in the field of bio­med­i­cine require the inter­ven­tion of the polit­i­cal author­i­ties and of the leg­is­la­tor, since an uncon­trolled appli­ca­tion of such tech­niques could lead to unfore­see­able and dam­ag­ing con­se­quences for civ­il soci­ety. Recourse to the con­science of each indi­vid­ual and to the self-reg­u­la­tion of researchers can­not be suf­fi­cient for ensur­ing respect for per­son­al rights and pub­lic order. If the leg­is­la­tor respon­si­ble for the com­mon good were not watch­ful, he could be deprived of his pre­rog­a­tives by researchers claim­ing to gov­ern human­i­ty in the name of the bio­log­i­cal dis­cov­er­ies and the alleged “improve­ment” process­es which they would draw from those dis­cov­er­ies. “Eugenism” and forms of dis­crim­i­na­tion between human beings could come to be legit­imized: this would con­sti­tute an act of vio­lence and a seri­ous offense to the equal­i­ty, dig­ni­ty and fun­da­men­tal rights of the human per­son. The inter­ven­tion of the pub­lic author­i­ty must be inspired by the ratio­nal prin­ci­ples which reg­u­late the rela­tion­ships between civ­il law and moral law. The task of the civ­il law is to ensure the com­mon good of peo­ple through the recog­ni­tion of and the defence of fun­da­men­tal rights and through the pro­mo­tion of peace and of pub­lic morality.(60) In no sphere of life can the civ­il law take the place of con­science or dic­tate norms con­cern­ing things which are out­side its com­pe­tence. It must some­times tol­er­ate, for the sake of pub­lic order, things which it can­not for­bid with­out a greater evil result­ing. How­ev­er, the inalien­able rights of the per­son must be rec­og­nized and respect­ed by civ­il soci­ety and the polit­i­cal author­i­ty. These human rights depend nei­ther on sin­gle indi­vid­u­als nor on par­ents; nor do they rep­re­sent a con­ces­sion made by soci­ety and the State: they per­tain to human nature and are inher­ent in the per­son by virtue of the cre­ative act from which the per­son took his of her ori­gin. Among such fun­da­men­tal rights one should men­tion in this regard: 

a) every human being’s right to life and phys­i­cal integri­ty from the moment of con­cep­tion until death; b) the rights of the fam­i­ly and of mar­riage as an insti­tu­tion and, in this area, the child’s right to be con­ceived, brought into the world and brought up by his par­ents. To each of these two themes it is nec­es­sary here to give some fur­ther consideration. 

In var­i­ous States cer­tain laws have autho­rized the direct sup­pres­sion of inno­cents: the moment a pos­i­tive law deprives a cat­e­go­ry of human beings of the pro­tec­tion which civ­il leg­is­la­tion must accord them, the State is deny­ing the equal­i­ty of all before the law. When the State does not place its pow­er at the ser­vice of the rights of each cit­i­zen, and in par­tic­u­lar of the more vul­ner­a­ble, the very foun­da­tions of a State based on law are under­mined. The polit­i­cal author­i­ty con­se­quent­ly can­not give approval to the call­ing of human beings into exis­tence through pro­ce­dures which would expose them to those very grave risks not­ed pre­vi­ous­ly. The pos­si­ble recog­ni­tion by pos­i­tive law and the polit­i­cal author­i­ties of tech­niques of arti­fi­cial trans­mis­sion of life and the exper­i­men­ta­tion con­nect­ed with it would widen the breach already opened by the legal­iza­tion of abor­tion. As a con­se­quence of the respect and pro­tec­tion which must be ensured for the unborn child from the moment of his con­cep­tion, the law must pro­vide appro­pri­ate penal sanc­tions for every delib­er­ate vio­la­tion of the child’s rights. The law can­not tol­er­ate — indeed it must express­ly for­bid — that human beings, even at the embry­on­ic stage, should be treat­ed as objects of exper­i­men­ta­tion, be muti­lat­ed or destroyed with the excuse that they are super­flu­ous or inca­pable of devel­op­ing normally. 

The polit­i­cal author­i­ty is bound to guar­an­tee to the insti­tu­tion of the fam­i­ly, upon which soci­ety is based, the juridi­cal pro­tec­tion to which it has a right. From the very fact that it is at the ser­vice of peo­ple, the polit­i­cal author­i­ty must also be at the ser­vice of the fam­i­ly. Civ­il law can­not grant approval to tech­niques of arti­fi­cial pro­cre­ation which, for the ben­e­fit of third par­ties (doc­tors, biol­o­gists, eco­nom­ic or gov­ern­men­tal pow­ers), take away what is a right inher­ent in the rela­tion­ship between spous­es; and there­fore civ­il law can­not legal­ize the dona­tion of gametes between per­sons who are not legit­i­mate­ly unit­ed in mar­riage. Leg­is­la­tion must also pro­hib­it, by virtue of the sup­port which is due to the fam­i­ly, embryo banks, post mortem insem­i­na­tion and “sur­ro­gate moth­er­hood”. It is part of the duty of the pub­lic author­i­ty to ensure that the civ­il law is reg­u­lat­ed accord­ing to the fun­da­men­tal norms of the moral law in mat­ters con­cern­ing human rights, human life and the insti­tu­tion of the fam­i­ly. Politi­cians must com­mit them­selves, through their inter­ven­tions upon pub­lic opin­ion, to secur­ing in soci­ety the widest pos­si­ble con­sen­sus on such essen­tial points and to con­sol­i­dat­ing this con­sen­sus wher­ev­er it risks being weak­ened or is in dan­ger of collapse.

In many coun­tries, the legal­iza­tion of abor­tion and juridi­cal tol­er­ance of unmar­ried cou­ples makes it more dif­fi­cult to secure respect for the fun­da­men­tal rights recalled by this Instruc­tion. It is to be hoped that States will not become respon­si­ble for aggra­vat­ing these social­ly dam­ag­ing sit­u­a­tions of injus­tice. It is rather to be hoped that nations and States will real­ize all the cul­tur­al, ide­o­log­i­cal and polit­i­cal impli­ca­tions con­nect­ed with the tech­niques of arti­fi­cial pro­cre­ation and will find the wis­dom and courage nec­es­sary for issu­ing laws which are more just and more respect­ful of human life and the insti­tu­tion of the fam­i­ly. The civ­il leg­is­la­tion of many states con­fers an undue legit­i­ma­tion upon cer­tain prac­tices in the eyes of many today; it is seen to be inca­pable of guar­an­tee­ing that moral­i­ty which is in con­for­mi­ty with the nat­ur­al exi­gen­cies of the human per­son and with the “unwrit­ten laws” etched by the Cre­ator upon the human heart. All men of good will must com­mit them­selves, par­tic­u­lar­ly with­in their pro­fes­sion­al field and in the exer­cise of their civ­il rights, to ensur­ing the reform of moral­ly unac­cept­able civ­il laws and the cor­rec­tion of illic­it prac­tices. In addi­tion, “con­sci­en­tious objec­tion” vis-à-vis such laws must be sup­port­ed and rec­og­nized. A move­ment of pas­sive resis­tance to the legit­i­ma­tion of prac­tices con­trary to human life and dig­ni­ty is begin­ning to make an ever sharp­er impres­sion upon the moral con­science of many, espe­cial­ly among spe­cial­ists in the bio­med­ical sciences.

CONCLUSION

The spread of tech­nolo­gies of inter­ven­tion in the process­es of human pro­cre­ation rais­es very seri­ous moral prob­lems in rela­tion to the respect due to the human being from the moment of con­cep­tion, to the dig­ni­ty of the per­son, of his or her sex­u­al­i­ty, and of the trans­mis­sion of life. With this Instruc­tion the Con­gre­ga­tion for the Doc­trine of the Faith, in ful­fill­ing its respon­si­bil­i­ty to pro­mote and defend the Church’s teach­ing in so seri­ous a mat­ter, address­es a new and heart­felt invi­ta­tion to all those who, by rea­son of their role and their com­mit­ment, can exer­cise a pos­i­tive influ­ence and ensure that, in the fam­i­ly and in soci­ety, due respect is accord­ed to life and love. It address­es this invi­ta­tion to those respon­si­ble for the for­ma­tion of con­sciences and of pub­lic opin­ion, to sci­en­tists and med­ical pro­fes­sion­als, to jurists and politi­cians. It hopes that all will under­stand the incom­pat­i­bil­i­ty between recog­ni­tion of the dig­ni­ty of the human per­son and con­tempt for life and love, between faith in the liv­ing God and the claim to decide arbi­trar­i­ly the ori­gin and fate of a human being. 

In par­tic­u­lar, the Con­gre­ga­tion for the Doc­trine of the Faith address­es an invi­ta­tion with con­fi­dence and encour­age­ment to the­olo­gians, and above all to moral­ists, that they study more deeply and make eves more acces­si­ble to the faith­ful the con­tents of the teach­ing of the Church’s Mag­is­teri­um in the light of a valid anthro­pol­o­gy in the mat­ter of sex­u­al­i­ty and mar­riage and in the con­text of the nec­es­sary inter­dis­ci­pli­nary approach. Thus they will make it pos­si­ble to under­stand ever more clear­ly the rea­sons for and the valid­i­ty of this teach­ing. By defend­ing man against the excess­es of his own pow­er, the Church of God reminds him of the rea­sons for his true nobil­i­ty; only in this way can the pos­si­bil­i­ty of liv­ing and lov­ing with that dig­ni­ty and lib­er­ty which derive from respect for the truth be ensured for the men and women of tomor­row. The pre­cise indi­ca­tions which are offered in the present Instruc­tion there­fore are not meant to halt the effort of reflec­tion but rather to give it a renewed impulse in unre­nounce­able fideli­ty to the teach­ing of the Church. 

In the light of the truth about the gift of human life and in the light of the moral prin­ci­ples which flow from that truth, every­one is invit­ed to act in the area of respon­si­bil­i­ty prop­er to each and, like the good Samar­i­tan, to rec­og­nize as a neigh­bour even the lit­tlest among the chil­dren of men (Cf . Lk 10: 2 9–37). Here Christ’s words find a new and par­tic­u­lar echo: “What you do to one of the least of my brethren, you do unto me” (Mt 25:40).

Dur­ing an audi­ence grant­ed to the under­signed Pre­fect after the ple­nary ses­sion of the Con­gre­ga­tion for the Doc­trine of the Faith, the Supreme Pon­tiff, John Paul II, approved this Instruc­tion and ordered it to be published. 

Giv­en at Rome, from the Con­gre­ga­tion for the Doc­trine of the Faith, Feb­ru­ary 22, 1987, the Feast of the Chair of St. Peter, the Apostle. 

JOSEPH Card. RATZINGER
Prefect

ALBERTO BOVONE
Tit­u­lar Arch­bish­op of Cae­sarea in Numidia Secretary


(1) POPE JOHN PAUL II, Dis­course to those tak­ing part in the 81st Con­gress of the Ital­ian Soci­ety of Inter­nal Med­i­cine and the 82nd Con­gress of the Ital­ian Soci­ety of Gen­er­al Surgery, 27 Octo­ber 1980: AAS 72 (1980) 1126.

(2) POPE PAUL VI, Dis­course to the Gen­er­al Assem­bly of the Unit­ed Nations Orga­ni­za­tion, 4 Octo­ber 1965: AAS 57 (1965) 878; Encycli­cal Pop­u­lo­rum Pro­gres­sio, 13: AAS 59 (1967) 263.

(3) POPE PAUL VI, Homi­ly dur­ing the Mass clos­ing the Holy Year, 25 Decem­ber 1975: AAS 68 (1976) 145; POPE JOHN PAUL II, Encycli­cal Dives in Mis­eri­cor­dia, 30: AAS 72 (1980) 1224.

(4) POPE JOHN PAUL II, Dis­course to those tak­ing part in the 35th Gen­er­al Assem­bly of the World Med­ical Asso­ci­a­tion, 29 Octo­ber 1983: AAS 76 (1984) 390.

(5) Cf. Dec­la­ra­tion Dig­ni­tatis Humanae, 2.

(6) Pas­toral Con­sti­tu­tion Gaudi­um et Spes, 22; POPE JOHN PAUL II, Encycli­cal Redemp­tor Homin­is, 8: AAS 71 (1979) 270–272.

(7) Cf. Pas­toral Con­sti­tu­tion Gaudi­um et Spes, 35.

(8) Pas­toral Con­sti­tu­tion Gaudi­um et Spes, 15; cf. also POPE PAUL VI, Encycli­cal Pop­u­lo­rum Pro­gres­sio, 20: AAS 59 (1967) 267; POPE JOHN PAUL II, Encycli­cal Redemp­tor Homin­is, 15: AAS 71 (1979) 286–289; Apos­tolic Exhor­ta­tion Famil­iaris Con­sor­tio, 8: AAS 74 (1982) 89.

(9) POPE JOHN PAUL II, Apos­tolic Exhor­ta­tion Famil­iaris Con­sor­tio, 11: AAS 74 (1982) 92.

(10) Cf. POPE PAUL VI, Encycli­cal Humanae Vitae, 10: AAS 60 (1968) 487–488.

(11) POPE JOHN PAUL II, Dis­course to the mem­bers of the 35th Gen­er­al Assem­bly of the World Med­ical Asso­ci­a­tion, 29 Octo­ber 1983: AAS 76 (1984) 393.

(12) Cf. POPE JOHN PAUL II, Apos­tolic Exhor­ta­tion Famil­iaris Con­sor­tio, 11: AAS 74 (1982) 91–92; cf. also Pas­toral Con­sti­tu­tion Gaudi­um et Spes, 50.

(13) SACRED CONGREGATION FOR THE DOCTRINE OF THE FAITH, Dec­la­ra­tion on Pro­cured Abor­tion, 9, AAS 66 (1974) 736–737.

(14) POPE JOHN PAUL II, Dis­course to those tak­ing part in the 35th Gen­er­al Assem­bly of the World Med­ical Asso­ci­a­tion, 29 Octo­ber 1983: AAS 76 (1984) 390.

(15) POPE JOHN XXIII, Encycli­cal Mater et Mag­is­tra, III: AAS 53 (1961) 447.

(16) Pas­toral Con­sti­tu­tion Gaudi­um et Spes, 24.

(17) Cf. POPE PIUS XII, Encycli­cal Humani Gener­is: AAS 42 (1950) 575; POPE PAUL VI, Pro­fes­sio Fidei: AAS 60 (1968) 436.

(18) POPE JOHN XXIII, Encycli­cal Mater et Mag­is­tra, III: AAS 53 (1961) 447; cf. POPE JOHN PAUL II, Dis­course to priests par­tic­i­pat­ing in a sem­i­nar on “Respon­si­ble Pro­cre­ation”, 17 Sep­tem­ber 1983, Inseg­na­men­ti di Gio­van­ni Pao­lo II, VI, 2 (1983) 562: “At the ori­gin of each human per­son there is a cre­ative act of God: no man comes into exis­tence by chance; he is always the result of the cre­ative love of God”.

(19) Cf. Pas­toral Con­sti­tu­tion Gaudi­um et Spes, 24.

(20) Cf. POPE PIUS XII, Dis­course to the Saint Luke Med­ical-Bio­log­i­cal Union, 12 Novem­ber 1944: Dis­cor­si e Radiomes­sag­gi VI (1944–1945) 191–192.

(21) Cf. Pas­toral Con­sti­tu­tion Gaudi­um et Spes, 50.

(22) Cf. Pas­toral Con­sti­tu­tion Gaudi­um et Spes, 51: “When it is a ques­tion of har­mo­niz­ing mar­ried love with the respon­si­ble trans­mis­sion of life, the moral char­ac­ter of one’s behav­iour does not depend only on the good inten­tion and the eval­u­a­tion of the motives: the objec­tive cri­te­ria must be used, cri­te­ria drawn from the nature of the human per­son and human acts, cri­te­ria which respect the total mean­ing of mutu­al self-giv­ing and human pro­cre­ation in the con­text of true love”.

(23) Pas­toral Con­sti­tu­tion Gaudi­um et Spes, 51.

(24) HOLY SEE, Char­ter of the Rights of the Fam­i­ly, 4: L’Osser­va­tore Romano, 25 Novem­ber 1983.

(25) SACRED CONGREGATION FOR THE DOCTRINE OF THE FAITH, Dec­la­ra­tion on Pro­cured Abor­tion, 12–13: AAS 66 (1974) 738.

(26) Cf. POPE PAUL VI, Dis­course to par­tic­i­pants in the Twen­ty-third Nation­al Con­gress of Ital­ian Catholic Jurists, 9 Decem­ber 1972: AAS 64 ( 1972) 777.

(27) The oblig­a­tion to avoid dis­pro­por­tion­ate risks involves an authen­tic respect for human beings and the upright­ness of ther­a­peu­tic inten­tions. It implies that the doc­tor “above all … must care­ful­ly eval­u­ate the pos­si­ble neg­a­tive con­se­quences which the nec­es­sary use of a par­tic­u­lar explorato­ry tech­nique may have upon the unborn child and avoid recourse to diag­nos­tic pro­ce­dures which do not offer suf­fi­cient guar­an­tees of their hon­est pur­pose and sub­stan­tial harm­less­ness. And if, as often hap­pens in human choic­es, a degree of risk must be under­tak­en, he will take care to assure that it is jus­ti­fied by a tru­ly urgent need for the diag­no­sis and by the impor­tance of the results that can be achieved by it for the ben­e­fit of the unborn child him­self” (POPE JOHN PAUL II, Dis­course to Par­tic­i­pants in the Pro-Life Move­ment Con­gress, 3 Decem­ber 1982: Inseg­nan­ten­ti di Gio­van­ni Pao­lo II, V, 3 [1982] 1512). This clar­i­fi­ca­tion con­cern­ing “pro­por­tion­ate risk” is also to be kept in mind in the fol­low­ing sec­tions of the present Instruc­tion, when­ev­er this term appears.

(28) POPE JOHN PAUL II, Dis­course to the Par­tic­i­pants in the 35th Gen­er­al Assem­bly of the World Med­ical Asso­ci­a­tion, 29 Octo­ber 1983: AAS 76 (1984) 392.

(29) Cf. POPE JOHN PAUL II, Address to a Meet­ing of the Pon­tif­i­cal Acad­e­my of Sci­ences, 23 Octo­ber 1982: AAS 75 (1983) 37: “I con­demn, in the most explic­it and for­mal way, exper­i­men­tal manip­u­la­tions of the human embryo, since the human being, from con­cep­tion to death, can­not be exploit­ed for any pur­pose whatsoever”.

(30) HOLY SEE, Char­ter of the Rights of the Fam­i­ly, 4b: L’Osser­va­tore Romano, 25 Novem­ber 1983.

(31) Cf. POPE JOHN PAUL II, Address to the Par­tic­i­pants in the Con­ven­tion of the Pro-Life Move­ment, 3 Decem­ber 1982: Inseg­na­men­ti di Gio­van­ni Pao­lo II, V, 3 (1982) 1511: “Any form of exper­i­men­ta­tion on the foe­tus that may dam­age its integri­ty or wors­en its con­di­tion is unac­cept­able, except in the case of a final effort to save it from death”. SACRED CONGREGATION FOR THE DOCTRINE OF THE FAITH, Dec­la­ra­tion on Euthana­sia, 4: AAS 72 (1980) 550: “In the absence of oth­er suf­fi­cient reme­dies, it is per­mit­ted, with the patien­t’s con­sent, to have recourse to the means pro­vid­ed by the most advanced med­ical tech­niques, even if these means are still at the exper­i­men­tal stage and are not with­out a cer­tain risk”.

(32) No one, before com­ing into exis­tence, can claim a sub­jec­tive right to begin to exist; nev­er­the­less, it is legit­i­mate to affirm the right of the child to have a ful­ly human ori­gin through con­cep­tion in con­for­mi­ty with the per­son­al nature of the human being. Life is a gift that must be bestowed in a man­ner wor­thy both of the sub­ject receiv­ing it and of the sub­jects trans­mit­ting it. This state­ment is to be borne in mind also for what will be explained con­cern­ing arti­fi­cial human procreation.

(33) Cf. POPE JOHN PAUL II, Dis­course to those tak­ing part in the 35th Gen­er­al Assem­bly of the World Med­ical Asso­ci­a­tion, 29 Octo­ber 1983: AAS 76 (1984) 391.

(34) Cf. Pas­toral Con­sti­tu­tion on the Church in the Mod­ern world, Gaudi­um et Spes, 50.

(35) Cf. POPE JOHN PAUL II, Apos­tolic Exhor­ta­tion Famil­iaris Con­sor­tio, 14: AAS 74 ( 1982) 96.

(36) Cf. POPE PIUS XII, Dis­course to those tak­ing part in the 4th Inter­na­tion­al Con­gress of Catholic Doc­tors, 29 Sep­tem­ber 1949: AAS 41 (1949) 559. Accord­ing to the plan of the Cre­ator, “A man leaves his father and his moth­er and cleaves to his wife, and they become one flesh” (Gen 2:24). The uni­ty of mar­riage, bound to the order of cre­ation, is a truth acces­si­ble to nat­ur­al rea­son. The Church’s Tra­di­tion and Mag­is­teri­um fre­quent­ly make ref­er­ence to the Book of Gen­e­sis, both direct­ly and through the pas­sages of the New Tes­ta­ment that refer to it: Mt 19: 4–6; Mk: 10:5–8; Eph 5: 31. Cf. ATHENAGORAS, Lega­tio pro chris­tia­n­is, 33: PG 6, 965–967; ST CHRYSOSTOM, In Matthaeum homil­i­ae, LXII, 19, 1: PG 58 597; ST LEO THE GREAT, Epist. ad Rus­ticum, 4: PL 54, 1204; INNOCENT III, Epist. Gaude­mus in Domi­no: DS 778; COUNCIL OF LYONS II, IV Ses­sion: DS 860; COUNCIL OF TRENT, XXIV , Ses­sion: DS 1798. 1802; POPE LEO XIII, Encycli­cal Arcanum Div­inae Sapi­en­ti­ae: ASS 12 (1879/80) 388–391; POPE PIUS XI, Encycli­cal Casti Con­nu­bii: AAS 22 (1930) 546–547; SECOND VATICAN COUNCIL, Gaudi­um et Spes, 48; POPE JOHN PAUL II, Apos­tolic Exhor­ta­tion Famil­iaris Con­sor­tio, 19: AAS 74 (1982) 101–102; Code of Canon Law, Can.1056.

(37) Cf. POPE PIUS XII, Dis­course to those tak­ing part in the 4th Inter­na­tion­al Con­gress of Catholic Doc­tors, 29 Sep­tem­ber 1949: AAS 41 (1949) 560; Dis­course to those tak­ing part in the Con­gress of the Ital­ian Catholic Union of Mid­wives, 29 Octo­ber 1951: AAS 43 (1951) 850; Code of Canon Law, Can. 1134.

(38) POPE PAUL VI, Encycli­cal Let­ter Humanae Vitae, 12: AAS 60 (1968) 488–489.

(39) Loc. cit., ibid., 489.

(40) POPE PIUS XII, Dis­course to those tak­ing part in the Sec­ond Naples World Con­gress on Fer­til­i­ty and Human Steril­i­ty, 19 May 1956: AAS 48 (1956) 470.

(41) Code of Canon Law, Can. 1061. Accord­ing to this Canon, the con­ju­gal act is that by which the mar­riage is con­sum­mat­ed if the cou­ple “have per­formed (it) between them­selves in a human manner”.

(42) Cf. Pas­toral Con­sti­tu­tion Gaudi­um et Spes, 14.

(43) Cf. POPE JOHN PAUL II, Gen­er­al Audi­ence on 16 Jan­u­ary 1980: Inseg­na­men­ti di Gio­van­ni Pao­lo II, III, 1 (1980) 148–152.

(44) POPE JOHN PAUL II, Dis­course to those tak­ing part in the 35th Gen­er­al Assem­bly of the World Med­ical Asso­ci­a­tion, 29 Octo­ber 1983: AAS 76 (1984) 393.

(45) Cf. Pas­toral Con­sti­tu­tion Gaudi­um et Spes, 51.

(46) Cf. Pas­toral Con­sti­tu­tion Gaudi­um et Spes, 50.

(47) Cf. POPE PIUS XII, Dis­course to those tak­ing part in the 4th Inter­na­tion­al Con­gress of Catholic Doc­tors, 29 Sep­tem­ber 1949: AAS 41 (1949) 560: “It would be erro­neous … to think that the pos­si­bil­i­ty of resort­ing to this means (arti­fi­cial fer­til­iza­tion) might ren­der valid a mar­riage between per­sons unable to con­tract it because of the imped­i­men­tum impo­ten­ti­ae”.

(48) A sim­i­lar ques­tion was dealt with by POPE PAUL VI, Encycli­cal Humanae Vitae, 14: AAS 60 (1968) 490–491.

(49) Cf. supra: I, 1 ff.

(50) POPE JOHN PAUL II, Apos­tolic Exhor­ta­tion Famil­iaris Con­sor­tio. 14: AAS 74 (1982) 96.

(51) Cf. Response of the Holy Office, 17 March 1897: DS 3323; POPE PIUS XII, Dis­course to those tak­ing part in the 4th Inter­na­tion­al Con­gress of Catholic Doc­tors, 29 Sep­tem­ber 1949: AAS 41 (1949) 560; Dis­course to the Ital­ian Catholic Union of Mid­wives, 29 Octo­ber 1951: AAS 43 (1951) 850; Dis­course to those tak­ing part in the Sec­ond Naples World Con­gress on Fer­til­i­ty and Human Steril­i­ty, 19 May 1956: AAS 48 (1956) 471–473; Dis­course to those tak­ing part in the 7th Inter­na­tion­al Con­gress of the Inter­na­tion­al Soci­ety of Haema­tol­ogy, 12 Sep­tem­ber 1958: AAS 50 (1958) 733; POPE JOHN XXIII, Encycli­cal Mater et Mag­is­tra, III: AAS 53 (1961) 447.

(52) POPE PIUS XII, Dis­course to the Ital­ian Catholic Union of Mid­wives, 29 Octo­ber 1951: AAS 43 ( 1951 ) 850.

(53) POPE PIUS XII, Dis­course to those tak­ing part in the 4th Inter­na­tion­al Con­gress of Catholic Doc­tors, 29 Sep­tem­ber 1949: AAS 41 (1949) 560.

(54) SACRED CONGREGATION FOR THE DOCTRINE OF THE FAITH, Dec­la­ra­tion on Cer­tain Ques­tions Con­cern­ing Sex­u­al ethics, 9: AAS 68 (1976) 86, which quotes the Pas­toral Con­sti­tu­tion Gaudi­um et Spes, 51. Cf. Decree of the Holy Office, 2 August 1929: AAS 21 (1929) 490; POPE PIUS XII, Dis­course to those tak­ing part in the 26th Con­gress of the Ital­ian Soci­ety of Urol­o­gy, 8 Octo­ber 1953: AAS 45 (1953) 678.

(55) Cf. POPE JOHN XXIII, Encycli­cal Mater et Mag­is­tra, III: AAS 53 (1961) 447.

(56) Cf. POPE PIUS XII, Dis­course to those tak­ing part in the 4th Inter­na­tion­al Con­gress of Catholic Doc­tors, 29 Sep­tem­ber 1949: AAS 41 (1949), 560.

(57) Cf. POPE PIUS XII, Dis­course to the tak­ing part in the Sec­ond Naples World Con­gress on Fer­til­i­ty and Human Steril­i­ty, 19 May 1956: AAS 48 (1956) 471–473.

(58) Pas­toral Con­sti­tu­tion Gaudi­um et Spes, 50.

(59) POPE JOHN PAUL II, Apos­tolic Exhor­ta­tion Famil­iaris Con­sor­tio, 14: AAS 74 (1982) 97.

(60) Cf. Dec­la­ra­tion Dig­ni­tatis Humanae, 7.

 

 

CONGREGATION POUR LA DOCTRINE DE LA FOI


I
NSTRUCTION

DONUM VITAE

SUR LE RESPECT DE LA VIE HUMAINE NAISSANTE
ET LA DIGNITÉ DE LA PROCRÉATION.

RÉPONSES A QUELQUES QUESTIONS D’ACTUALITÉ

 

PRELIMINAIRES

La Con­gré­ga­tion pour la Doc­trine de la Foi a été inter­rogée par des Con­férences Épis­co­pales, des Évêques, des théolo­giens, des médecins et hommes de sci­ence, sur la con­for­mité avec les principes de la morale catholique des tech­niques bio­médi­cales per­me­t­tant d’in­ter­venir dans la phase ini­tiale de la vie de l’être humain et dans les proces­sus mêmes de la pro­créa­tion. La présente Instruc­tion, fruit d’une vaste con­sul­ta­tion, et en par­ti­c­uli­er d’une atten­tive éval­u­a­tion des déc­la­ra­tions de divers épis­co­pats, n’en­tend pas rap­pel­er tout l’enseignement de l’Église sur la dig­nité de la vie humaine nais­sante et de la pro­créa­tion, mais offrir — à la lumière des précé­dents enseigne­ments du Mag­istère — des répons­es spé­ci­fiques aux prin­ci­pales ques­tions soulevées à ce propos.

L’ex­po­si­tion est ordon­née de la manière suiv­ante: une intro­duc­tion rap­pellera les principes fon­da­men­taux, de car­ac­tère anthro­pologique et moral, néces­saires pour une éval­u­a­tion adéquate des prob­lèmes et pour l’élaboration des répons­es à ces deman­des; la pre­mière par­tie aura pour objet le respect de l’être humain à par­tir du pre­mier moment de son exis­tence; la sec­onde par­tie affron­tera les ques­tions morales posées par les inter­ven­tions de la tech­nique sur la pro­créa­tion humaine; dans la troisième par­tie seront présen­tées quelques ori­en­ta­tions sur les rap­ports entre loi morale et loi civile à pro­pos du respect dû aux embryons et fœtus humains* en rela­tion avec la légitim­ité des tech­niques de pro­créa­tion artificielle.

* Les ter­mes de « zygote », « pré-embry­on », « embry­on » et « fœtus » peu­vent indi­quer, dans le vocab­u­laire de la biolo­gie, des stades suc­ces­sifs du développe­ment d’un être humain. La présente Instruc­tion use libre­ment de ces ter­mes, en leur attribuant une iden­tique impor­tance éthique, pour désign­er le fruit — vis­i­ble ou non — de la généra­tion humaine, depuis le pre­mier moment de son exis­tence jusqu’à sa nais­sance. La rai­son de cette util­i­sa­tion ressort du texte même (cf. I, 1).

 

INTRODUCTION

1.
LA RECHERCHE BIOMEDICALE
ET L’ENSEIGNEMENT DE L’EGLISE

Le don de la vie que Dieu, Créa­teur et Père, a con­fié à l’homme, impose à celui-ci de pren­dre con­science de sa valeur ines­timable et d’en assumer la respon­s­abil­ité. Ce principe fon­da­men­tal doit être placé au cen­tre de la réflex­ion, pour éclair­er et résoudre les prob­lèmes moraux soulevés par les inter­ven­tions arti­fi­cielles sur la vie nais­sante et sur les proces­sus de la procréation.

Grâce au pro­grès des sci­ences biologiques et médi­cales, l’homme peut dis­pos­er de ressources thérapeu­tiques tou­jours plus effi­caces; mais il peut aus­si acquérir des pou­voirs nou­veaux, aux con­séquences imprévis­i­bles, sur la vie humaine dans son com­mence­ment même et à ses pre­miers stades. Divers procédés per­me­t­tent main­tenant d’a­gir non seule­ment pour assis­ter, mais aus­si pour domin­er les proces­sus de la pro­créa­tion. Ces tech­niques peu­vent per­me­t­tre à l’homme de « pren­dre en main son pro­pre des­tin », mais elles l’ex­posent aus­si « à la ten­ta­tion d’outrepass­er les lim­ites d’une raisonnable dom­i­na­tion de la nature » [1]. Si elles peu­vent con­stituer un pro­grès au ser­vice de l’homme, elles com­por­tent aus­si des risques graves. Aus­si beau­coup lan­cent-ils un urgent appel pour que soient sauve­g­ardés, dans les inter­ven­tions sur la pro­créa­tion, les valeurs et les droits de la per­son­ne humaine. Les deman­des d’é­clair­cisse­ments et d’ori­en­ta­tions ne provi­en­nent pas seule­ment des fidèles, mais aus­si de ceux qui de toute façon recon­nais­sent à l’Église, « experte en human­ité » [2], une mis­sion au ser­vice de la « civil­i­sa­tion de l’amour » [3] et de la vie.

Le Mag­istère de l’Église n’in­ter­vient pas au nom d’une com­pé­tence par­ti­c­ulière dans le domaine des sci­ences expéri­men­tales; mais, après avoir pris con­nais­sance des don­nées de la recherche et de la tech­nique, il entend pro­pos­er, en ver­tu de sa mis­sion évangélique et de son devoir apos­tolique, la doc­trine morale qui cor­re­spond à la dig­nité de la per­son­ne et à sa voca­tion inté­grale, en exposant les critères de juge­ment moral sur les appli­ca­tions de la recherche sci­en­tifique et de la tech­nique, en par­ti­c­uli­er pour tout ce qui con­cerne la vie humaine et ses com­mence­ments. Ces critères sont le respect, la défense et la pro­mo­tion de l’homme, son « droit pri­maire et fon­da­men­tal » à la vie [4], sa dig­nité de per­son­ne dotée d’une âme spir­ituelle, de respon­s­abil­ité morale [5], et appelée à la com­mu­nion bien­heureuse avec Dieu.

L’in­ter­ven­tion de l’Église, même en ce domaine, s’in­spire de l’amour qu’elle doit à l’homme, en l’aidant à recon­naître et à respecter ses droits et ses devoirs. Cet amour s’al­i­mente aux sources de la char­ité du Christ: en con­tem­plant le mys­tère du Verbe Incar­né, l’Église con­naît aus­si le « mys­tère de l’homme » [6]; en annonçant l’É­vangile du salut, elle révèle à l’homme sa dig­nité et l’in­vite à décou­vrir pleine­ment sa vérité. L’Église rap­pelle ain­si la loi divine pour faire œuvre de vérité et de libération.

C’est en effet par bon­té — pour indi­quer le chemin de la vie — que Dieu donne aux hommes ses com­man­de­ments et la grâce pour les observ­er; et c’est encore par bon­té — pour les aider à per­sévér­er dans la même voie — que Dieu offre tou­jours à cha­cun son par­don. Le Christ a com­pas­sion pour nos fragilités: Il est notre Créa­teur et notre Rédemp­teur. Que son Esprit ouvre les âmes au don de la paix de Dieu et à l’in­tel­li­gence de ses préceptes!

2.
LA SCIENCE ET LA TECHNIQUE
AU SERVICE DE LA PERSONNE HUMAINE

Dieu a créé l’homme à son image et à sa ressem­blance: « homme et femme il les créa » (Gen1, 27), leur con­fi­ant la tâche de « domin­er la terre » (Gen 1, 28). La recherche sci­en­tifique de base comme la recherche appliquée con­stituent une expres­sion sig­ni­fica­tive de cette seigneurie de l’homme sur la créa­tion. La sci­ence et la tech­nique, pré­cieuses ressources de l’homme quand elles sont mis­es à son ser­vice et en promeu­vent le développe­ment inté­gral au béné­fice de tous, ne peu­vent pas indi­quer à elles seules le sens de l’ex­is­tence et du pro­grès humain. Étant ordon­nées à l’homme, dont elles tirent orig­ine et accroisse­ment, c’est dans la per­son­ne et ses valeurs morales qu’elles trou­vent l’indi­ca­tion de leur final­ité et la con­science de leurs limites.

Il serait donc illu­soire de revendi­quer la neu­tral­ité morale de la recherche sci­en­tifique et de ses appli­ca­tions; d’autre part, les critères d’ori­en­ta­tion ne peu­vent pas être déduits de la sim­ple effi­cac­ité tech­nique, de l’u­til­ité qui peut en découler pour les uns au détri­ment des autres, ou pis encore, des idéolo­gies dom­i­nantes. Aus­si la sci­ence et la tech­nique requièrent-elles, pour leur sig­ni­fi­ca­tion intrin­sèque même, le respect incon­di­tion­né des critères fon­da­men­taux de la moral­ité; c’est-à-dire qu’elles doivent être au ser­vice de la per­son­ne humaine, de ses droits inal­ién­ables, de son bien véri­ta­ble et inté­gral, con­for­mé­ment au pro­jet et à la volon­té de Dieu [7].

Le rapi­de développe­ment des décou­vertes tech­nologiques rend plus urgente cette exi­gence de respect des critères rap­pelés: la sci­ence sans con­science ne peut que con­duire à la ruine de l’homme. « Notre époque, plus encore que les temps passés, a besoin de cette sagesse pour ren­dre plus humaines ses nou­velles décou­vertes. Il y a un péril effec­tif pour l’avenir du monde, à moins que ne survi­en­nent des hommes plus sages » [8].

3.
ANTHROPOLOGIE ET INTERVENTIONS
DANS LE DOMAINE BIOMEDICAL

Quels critères moraux doit-on appli­quer pour éclair­er les prob­lèmes posés aujour­d’hui dans le cadre de la bio­médecine? La réponse à cette demande sup­pose une juste con­cep­tion de la nature de la per­son­ne humaine dans sa dimen­sion corporelle.

En effet, c’est seule­ment dans la ligne de sa vraie nature que la per­son­ne humaine peut se réalis­er comme une « total­ité unifiée » [9]; or cette nature est en même temps cor­porelle et spir­ituelle. En rai­son de son union sub­stantielle avec une âme spir­ituelle, le corps humain ne peut pas être con­sid­éré seule­ment comme un ensem­ble de tis­sus, d’or­ganes et de fonc­tions; il ne peut être éval­ué de la même manière que le corps des ani­maux, mais il est par­tie con­sti­tu­tive de la per­son­ne qui se man­i­feste et s’ex­prime à tra­vers lui.

La loi morale naturelle exprime et pre­scrit les final­ités, les droits et les devoirs qui se fondent sur la nature cor­porelle et spir­ituelle de la per­son­ne humaine. Aus­si ne peut-elle pas être conçue comme nor­ma­tiv­ité sim­ple­ment biologique, mais elle doit être définie comme l’or­dre rationnel selon lequel l’homme est appelé par le Créa­teur à diriger et à régler sa vie et ses actes, et, en par­ti­c­uli­er, à user et à dis­pos­er de son pro­pre corps [10].

Une pre­mière con­séquence peut être déduite de ces principes: une inter­ven­tion sur le corps humain ne touche pas seule­ment les tis­sus, les organes et leurs fonc­tions, mais elle engage aus­si à des niveaux divers la per­son­ne même; elle com­porte donc une sig­ni­fi­ca­tion et une respon­s­abil­ité morales, implicite­ment peut-être, mais réelle­ment. Jean-Paul II rap­pelait avec force à l’As­so­ci­a­tion Médi­cale Mon­di­ale: « Chaque per­son­ne humaine, dans sa sin­gu­lar­ité absol­u­ment unique, n’est pas con­sti­tuée seule­ment par son esprit, mais par son corps. Ain­si, dans le corps et par le corps, on touche la per­son­ne humaine dans sa réal­ité con­crète. Respecter la dig­nité de l’homme revient par con­séquent à sauve­g­arder cette iden­tité de l’homme cor­pore et ani­ma unus, comme le dit le Con­cile Vat­i­can II (con­st. Gaudi­um et Spes, n. 14, 1). C’est sur la base de cette vision anthro­pologique que l’on doit trou­ver des critères fon­da­men­taux pour les déci­sions à pren­dre s’il s’ag­it d’in­ter­ven­tions non stricte­ment thérapeu­tiques, par exem­ple d’in­ter­ven­tions visant à l’amélio­ra­tion de la con­di­tion biologique humaine » [11].

Dans leurs appli­ca­tions, la biolo­gie et la médecine con­courent au bien inté­gral de la vie humaine lorsqu’elles vien­nent en aide à la per­son­ne, atteinte de mal­adie et d’in­fir­mité, dans le respect de sa dig­nité de créa­ture de Dieu. Nul biol­o­giste ou médecin ne peut raisonnable­ment pré­ten­dre décider de l’o­rig­ine et du des­tin des hommes au nom de sa com­pé­tence sci­en­tifique. Cette norme doit s’ap­pli­quer d’une façon par­ti­c­ulière dans le domaine de la sex­u­al­ité et de la pro­créa­tion, où l’homme et la femme met­tent en œuvre les valeurs fon­da­men­tales de l’amour et de la vie.

Dieu, qui est amour et vie, a inscrit dans l’homme et la femme la voca­tion à une par­tic­i­pa­tion spé­ciale à son mys­tère de com­mu­nion per­son­nelle et à son œuvre de Créa­teur et de Père [12]. C’est pourquoi le mariage pos­sède des biens spé­ci­fiques et des valeurs d’u­nion et de pro­créa­tion sans com­mune mesure avec celles qui exis­tent dans les formes inférieures de la vie. Ces valeurs et sig­ni­fi­ca­tions d’or­dre per­son­nel déter­mi­nent du point de vue moral le sens et les lim­ites des inter­ven­tions arti­fi­cielles sur la pro­créa­tion et l’o­rig­ine de la vie humaine. Ces inter­ven­tions ne sont pas à rejeter parce qu’ar­ti­fi­cielles. Comme telles, elles témoignent des pos­si­bil­ités de l’art médi­cal. Mais elles sont à éval­uer morale­ment par référence à la dig­nité de la per­son­ne humaine, appelée à réalis­er la voca­tion divine au don de l’amour et au don de la vie.

4.
CRITERES FONDAMENTAUX POUR UN JUGEMENT MORAL

Les valeurs fon­da­men­tales rel­a­tives aux tech­niques de pro­créa­tion arti­fi­cielle humaine sont au nom­bre de deux: la vie de l’être humain appelé à l’ex­is­tence, et l’o­rig­i­nal­ité de sa trans­mis­sion dans le mariage. Le juge­ment moral sur les méth­odes de pro­créa­tion arti­fi­cielle devra donc être for­mulé en référence à ces valeurs.

La vie physique, par laque­lle com­mence l’aven­ture humaine dans le monde, n’épuise assuré­ment pas en soi toute la valeur de la per­son­ne, et ne représente pas le bien suprême de l’homme qui est appelé à l’é­ter­nité. Toute­fois, elle en con­stitue d’une cer­taine manière la valeur « fon­da­men­tale », pré­cisé­ment parce que c’est sur la vie physique que se fondent et se dévelop­pent toutes les autres valeurs de la per­son­ne [13]. L’in­vi­o­la­bil­ité du droit à la vie de l’être humain inno­cent « depuis le moment de la con­cep­tion jusqu’à la mort » [14] est un signe et une exi­gence de l’in­vi­o­la­bil­ité même de la per­son­ne, à laque­lle le Créa­teur a fait le don de la vie.

Par rap­port à la trans­mis­sion des autres formes de vie dans l’u­nivers, la trans­mis­sion de la vie humaine a une orig­i­nal­ité pro­pre, qui dérive de l’o­rig­i­nal­ité même de la per­son­ne humaine. « La trans­mis­sion de la vie humaine a été con­fiée par la nature à un acte per­son­nel et con­scient, et comme tel soumis aux très saintes lois de Dieu: ces lois invi­o­lables et immuables doivent être recon­nues et observées. C’est pourquoi on ne peut user de moyens et suiv­re des méth­odes qui peu­vent être licites dans la trans­mis­sion de la vie des plantes et des ani­maux » [15].

Les pro­grès de la tech­nique ont aujour­d’hui ren­du pos­si­ble une pro­créa­tion sans rap­port sex­uel, grâce à la ren­con­tre in vit­ro des cel­lules ger­mi­nales précédem­ment prélevées sur l’homme et la femme. Mais ce qui est tech­nique­ment pos­si­ble n’est pas pour autant morale­ment admis­si­ble. La réflex­ion rationnelle sur les valeurs fon­da­men­tales de la vie et de la pro­créa­tion humaine est donc indis­pens­able pour for­muler l’é­val­u­a­tion morale à l’é­gard de ces inter­ven­tions de la tech­nique sur l’être humain dès les pre­miers stades de son développement.

5.
ENSEIGNEMENTS DU MAGISTERE

Pour sa part, le Mag­istère de l’Église offre aus­si en ce domaine à la rai­son humaine la lumière de la Révéla­tion: la doc­trine sur l’homme enseignée par le Mag­istère con­tient beau­coup d’élé­ments qui éclairent les prob­lèmes ici étudiés.

Dès le moment de sa con­cep­tion, la vie de tout être humain doit être absol­u­ment respec­tée, car l’homme est sur terre l’u­nique créa­ture que Dieu a « voulue pour lui-même » [16] et l’âme spir­ituelle de tout homme est « immé­di­ate­ment créée » par Dieu [17]; tout son être porte l’im­age du Créa­teur. La vie humaine est sacrée parce que, dès son orig­ine, elle com­porte « l’ac­tion créa­trice de Dieu » [18] et demeure pour tou­jours dans une rela­tion spé­ciale avec le Créa­teur, son unique fin [19]. Dieu seul est le Maître de la vie de son com­mence­ment à son terme: per­son­ne, en aucune cir­con­stance, ne peut revendi­quer pour soi le droit de détru­ire directe­ment un être humain inno­cent [20].

La pro­créa­tion humaine demande une col­lab­o­ra­tion respon­s­able des époux avec l’amour fécond de Dieu [21]; le don de la vie humaine doit se réalis­er dans le mariage moyen­nant les actes spé­ci­fiques et exclusifs des époux, suiv­ant les lois inscrites dans leurs per­son­nes et dans leur union [22].

 

I
LE RESPECT DES EMBRYONS HUMAINS

Une réflex­ion atten­tive sur cet enseigne­ment du Mag­istère et sur les don­nées rationnelles ci-dessus rap­pelées, per­met de répon­dre aux mul­ti­ples prob­lèmes moraux posés par les inter­ven­tions tech­niques sur l’être humain dans les phas­es ini­tiales de sa vie, et sur les proces­sus de sa conception.

  1. Quel respect doit-on a l’embryon humain, compte tenu de sa nature et de son identite?

L’être humain doit être respec­té comme une per­son­ne dès le pre­mier instant de son existence.

La mise en œuvre des procédés de fécon­da­tion arti­fi­cielle a ren­du pos­si­bles divers­es inter­ven­tions sur les embryons et les fœtus humains. Les buts pour­suiv­is sont de gen­res divers: diag­nos­tiques et thérapeu­tiques, sci­en­tifiques et com­mer­ci­aux. De tout cela découlent de graves prob­lèmes. Peut-on par­ler d’un droit à l’ex­péri­men­ta­tion sur les embryons humains en vue de la recherche sci­en­tifique? Quelles régle­men­ta­tions ou quelle lég­is­la­tion éla­bor­er en cette matière? La réponse à ces ques­tions sup­pose une réflex­ion appro­fondie sur la nature et sur l’i­den­tité pro­pre — on par­le même de « statut » — de l’embryon humain.

Pour sa part, dans le Con­cile Vat­i­can II, l’Église a pro­posé à nou­veau à l’homme con­tem­po­rain son enseigne­ment con­stant et cer­tain, selon lequel « la vie, une fois conçue, doit être pro­tégée avec le plus grand soin; l’a­vorte­ment, comme l’in­fan­ti­cide, sont des crimes abom­inables » [23]. Plus récem­ment, la Charte des Droits de la Famille pub­liée par le Saint-Siège le réaf­fir­mait: « La vie humaine doit être respec­tée et pro­tégée de manière absolue depuis le moment de la con­cep­tion » [24].

Cette Con­gré­ga­tion con­naît les dis­cus­sions actuelles sur le com­mence­ment de la vie humaine, sur l’in­di­vid­u­al­ité de l’être humain et sur l’i­den­tité de la per­son­ne humaine. Elle rap­pelle les enseigne­ments con­tenus dans sa Déc­la­ra­tion sur l’avortement provo­qué: « Dès que l’ovule est fécondé, se trou­ve inau­gurée une vie qui n’est ni celle du père ni celle de la mère, mais d’un nou­v­el être humain qui se développe par lui-même. Il ne sera jamais ren­du humain s’il ne l’est pas dès lors. A cette évi­dence de tou­jours […] la sci­ence géné­tique mod­erne apporte de pré­cieuses con­fir­ma­tions. Elle a mon­tré que, dès le pre­mier instant, se trou­ve fixé le pro­gramme de ce que sera ce vivant: un homme, cet homme indi­vidu­el avec ses notes car­ac­téris­tiques déjà bien déter­minées. Dès la fécon­da­tion, est com­mencée l’aven­ture d’une vie humaine dont cha­cune des grandes capac­ités demande du temps pour se met­tre en place et se trou­ver prête à agir » [25]. Cette doc­trine demeure val­able, et est du reste con­fir­mée, s’il en était besoin, par les récentes acqui­si­tions de la biolo­gie humaine, qui recon­naît que dans le zygote* déri­vant de la fécon­da­tion s’est déjà con­sti­tuée l’i­den­tité biologique d’un nou­v­el indi­vidu humain.

Certes, aucune don­née expéri­men­tale ne peut être de soi suff­isante pour faire recon­naître une âme spir­ituelle; toute­fois, les con­clu­sions sci­en­tifiques sur l’embryon humain four­nissent une indi­ca­tion pré­cieuse pour dis­cern­er rationnelle­ment une présence per­son­nelle dès cette pre­mière appari­tion d’une vie humaine: com­ment un indi­vidu humain ne serait-il pas une per­son­ne humaine? Le Mag­istère ne s’est pas expressé­ment engagé sur une affir­ma­tion de nature philosophique, mais il réaf­firme d’une manière con­stante la con­damna­tion morale de tout avorte­ment provo­qué. Cet enseigne­ment n’est pas changé, et il demeure inchange­able [26].

C’est pourquoi le fruit de la généra­tion humaine dès le pre­mier instant de son exis­tence, c’est-à-dire à par­tir de la con­sti­tu­tion du zygote, exige le respect incon­di­tion­nel morale­ment dû à l’être humain dans sa total­ité cor­porelle et spir­ituelle. L’être humain doit être respec­té et traité comme une per­son­ne dès sa con­cep­tion, et donc dès ce moment on doit lui recon­naître les droits de la per­son­ne, par­mi lesquels en pre­mier lieu le droit invi­o­lable de tout être humain inno­cent à la vie.

Ce rap­pel doc­tri­nal offre le critère fon­da­men­tal pour la solu­tion des divers prob­lèmes posés par le développe­ment des sci­ences bio­médi­cales en ce domaine: puisqu’il doit être traité comme une per­son­ne, l’embryon devra aus­si être défendu dans son intégrité, soigné et guéri, dans la mesure du pos­si­ble, comme tout autre être humain dans le cadre de l’as­sis­tance médicale.

* Le zygote est la cel­lule déri­vant de la fusion des noy­aux de deux gamètes.

  1. Le diag­nos­tic pré­na­tal est-il morale­ment licite?

Si le diag­nos­tic pré­na­tal respecte la vie et l’in­tégrité de l’embryon et du foe­tus humain, et s’il est ori­en­té à sa sauve­g­arde ou à sa guéri­son indi­vidu­elle, la réponse est affirmative.

Le diag­nos­tic pré­na­tal peut en effet faire con­naître les con­di­tions de l’embryon et du foe­tus quand il est encore dans le sein de sa mère; il per­met ou laisse prévoir cer­taines inter­ven­tions thérapeu­tiques, médi­cales ou chirur­gi­cales, d’une manière plus pré­coce et plus efficace.

Ce diag­nos­tic est licite si les méth­odes util­isées, avec le con­sen­te­ment des par­ents con­ven­able­ment infor­més, sauve­g­ar­dent la vie et l’in­tégrité de l’embryon et de sa mère, sans leur faire courir de risques dis­pro­por­tion­nés [27]. Mais il est grave­ment en oppo­si­tion avec la loi morale quand il prévoit, en fonc­tion des résul­tats, l’éven­tu­al­ité de provo­quer un avorte­ment: un diag­nos­tic attes­tant l’ex­is­tence d’une mal­for­ma­tion ou d’une mal­adie hérédi­taire ne doit pas être l’équiv­a­lent d’une sen­tence de mort. Aus­si, la femme qui deman­derait ce diag­nos­tic avec l’in­ten­tion bien arrêtée de procéder à l’a­vorte­ment au cas où le résul­tat con­firmerait l’ex­is­tence d’une mal­for­ma­tion ou d’une anom­alie, com­met­trait-elle une action grave­ment illicite. De même agi­raient con­traire­ment à la morale le con­joint, les par­ents ou toute autre per­son­ne, s’ils con­seil­laient ou impo­saient le diag­nos­tic à la femme enceinte dans la même inten­tion d’en venir éventuelle­ment à l’a­vorte­ment. Ain­si égale­ment serait respon­s­able d’une col­lab­o­ra­tion illicite le spé­cial­iste qui, dans sa manière de pos­er le diag­nos­tic et d’en com­mu­ni­quer les résul­tats, con­tribuerait volon­taire­ment à établir ou à favoris­er le lien entre diag­nos­tic pré­na­tal et avortement.

On doit enfin con­damn­er, comme une vio­la­tion du droit à la vie de l’en­fant à naître et comme une atteinte grave aux droits et devoirs pri­or­i­taires des époux, toute direc­tive ou pro­gramme émanant des autorités civiles, san­i­taires, ou d’or­gan­ismes sci­en­tifiques, qui favoris­erait en quelque manière la con­nex­ion entre diag­nos­tic pré­na­tal et avorte­ment, ou qui incit­erait les femmes enceintes à se soumet­tre à un diag­nos­tic pré­na­tal plan­i­fié dans le but d’élim­in­er les fœtus déjà atteints ou por­teurs de mal­for­ma­tions ou de mal­adies héréditaires.

  1. Les inter­ven­tions thérapeu­tiques sur l’embryon humain sont-elles licites?

Comme pour toute inter­ven­tion médi­cale sur des patients, on doit con­sid­ér­er comme licites les inter­ven­tions sur l’embryon humain, à con­di­tion qu’elles respectent la vie et l’in­tégrité de l’embryon et qu’elles ne com­por­tent pas pour lui de risques dis­pro­por­tion­nés, mais qu’elles visent à sa guéri­son, à l’amélio­ra­tion de ses con­di­tion de san­té, ou à sa survie individuelle.

Quel que soit le genre de thérapie médi­cale, chirur­gi­cale ou d’un autre type, le con­sen­te­ment libre et infor­mé des par­ents est req­uis, selon les règles déon­tologiques prévues dans le cas des enfants. S’agis­sant d’une vie embry­on­naire ou de fœtus, l’ap­pli­ca­tion de ce principe moral peut deman­der des pré­cau­tions déli­cates et particulières.

La légitim­ité et les critères de ces inter­ven­tions ont été claire­ment exprimées par Jean-Paul II: « Une inter­ven­tion stricte­ment thérapeu­tique qui se fixe comme objec­tif la guéri­son de divers­es mal­adies, comme celles dues à des défi­ciences chro­mo­somiques, sera, en principe, con­sid­érée comme souhaitable, pourvu qu’elle tende à la vraie pro­mo­tion du bien-être per­son­nel de l’homme, sans porter atteinte à son intégrité ou détéri­or­er ses con­di­tions de vie. Une telle inter­ven­tion se situe en effet dans la logique de la tra­di­tion morale chré­ti­enne » [28].

  1. Com­ment appréci­er morale­ment la recherche et l’ex­péri­men­ta­tion* sur les embryons et sur les fœtus humains ?

La recherche médi­cale doit s’ab­stenir d’in­ter­ven­tions sur les embryons vivants, à moins qu’il n’y ait cer­ti­tude morale de ne causer de dom­mage ni à la vie ni à l’in­tégrité de l’en­fant à naître et de sa mère, et à con­di­tion que les par­ents aient don­né pour l’in­ter­ven­tion sur l’embryon leur con­sen­te­ment libre et infor­mé. Il s’en­suit que toute recherche, même lim­itée à une sim­ple obser­va­tion de l’embryon, deviendrait illicite dès lors que, à cause des méth­odes util­isées ou des effets provo­qués, elle impli­querait un risque pour l’in­tégrité physique ou la vie de l’embryon.

En ce qui con­cerne l’ex­péri­men­ta­tion — pré­sup­posée la dis­tinction générale entre celle qui a une final­ité non directe­ment thérapeu­tique et celle qui est claire­ment thérapeu­tique pour le sujet lui-même —, il faut encore dis­tinguer entre l’ex­péri­men­ta­tion effec­tuée sur des embryons encore vivants et l’ex­péri­men­ta­tion effec­tuée sur des embryons morts. S’ils sont encore vivants, viables ou non, ils doivent être respec­tés comme toutes les per­son­nes humaines; l’expérimentation non directe­ment thérapeu­tique sur les embryons est illicite [29].

Aucune final­ité, même noble en soi comme la prévi­sion d’une util­ité pour la sci­ence, pour d’autres êtres humains ou pour la société, ne peut en quelque manière jus­ti­fi­er l’ex­péri­men­ta­tion sur des embryons ou des fœtus humains vivants, viables ou non, dans le sein mater­nel ou en dehors de lui. Le con­sen­te­ment infor­mé, nor­male­ment req­uis pour l’ex­péri­men­ta­tion clin­ique sur l’adulte, ne peut être con­cédé par les par­ents, qui ne peu­vent dis­pos­er ni de l’in­tégrité physique ni de la vie de l’en­fant à naître. D’autre part, l’ex­péri­men­ta­tion sur les embryons ou fœtus com­porte tou­jours le risque — et même sou­vent la prévi­sion cer­taine — d’un dom­mage pour leur intégrité physique ou de leur mort.

L’u­til­i­sa­tion de l’embryon humain ou d’un fœtus comme objet ou instru­ment d’ex­péri­men­ta­tion représente un délit à l’é­gard de leur dig­nité d’êtres humains ayant droit au même respect que l’en­fant déjà né et toute per­son­ne humaine. La Charte des Droits de la Famille pub­liée par le Saint-Siège déclare: « Le respect pour la dig­nité de l’être humain exclut toute espèce de manip­u­la­tion expéri­men­tale ou exploita­tion de l’embryon humain » [30]. La pra­tique de main­tenir en vie des embryons humains, in vivo ou in vit­ro, à des fins expéri­men­tales ou com­mer­ciales est absol­u­ment con­traire à la dig­nité humaine.

Dans le cas de l’ex­péri­men­ta­tion claire­ment thérapeu­tique, c’est-à-dire s’il s’agis­sait de thérapies expéri­men­tales util­isées au béné­fice de l’embryon lui-même comme une ten­ta­tive extrême pour lui sauver la vie, et faute d’autres thérapies val­ables, le recours à des remèdes ou à des procédés pas encore entière­ment éprou­vés peut être licite [31].

Les cadavres d’embryons ou fœtus humains, volon­taire­ment avortés ou non, doivent être respec­tés comme les dépouilles des autres êtres humains. En par­ti­c­uli­er, ils ne peu­vent faire l’ob­jet de muti­la­tions ou autop­sies si leur mort n’a pas été con­statée, et sans le con­sen­te­ment des par­ents ou de la mère. De plus, il faut que soit sauve­g­ardée l’ex­i­gence morale exclu­ant toute com­plic­ité avec l’a­vorte­ment volon­taire, de même que tout dan­ger de scan­dale. Dans le cas des fœtus morts, comme pour les cadavres de per­son­nes adultes, toute pra­tique com­mer­ciale doit être con­sid­érée comme illicite et doit être interdite.

* Comme les ter­mes « recherche » et « expéri­men­ta­tion » sont fréquem­ment util­isés d’une manière équiv­a­lente et ambiguë, il con­vient de pré­cis­er le sens qui leur est attribué dans le présent document.

1) Par recherche, on entend tout procédé induc­tif-déduc­tif visant à pro­mou­voir l’ob­ser­va­tion sys­té­ma­tique d’un phénomène don­né dans le champ humain, ou à véri­fi­er une hypothèse découlant de précé­dentes observations.

2) Par expéri­men­ta­tion, on entend toute recherche dans laque­lle l’être humain (aux divers stades de son exis­tence: embry­on, fœtus, enfant ou adulte) représente l’ob­jet grâce auquel ou sur lequel on entend véri­fi­er l’ef­fet — à ce moment incon­nu ou encore mal con­nu — d’un traite­ment don­né (par exem­ple phar­ma­ceu­tique, tératogène, chirur­gi­cal, etc.).

  1. Com­ment appréci­er morale­ment l’usage, a des fins de re­cherche, des embryons obtenus pàr la fécon­da­tion « in vitro »?

Les embryons humains obtenus in vit­ro sont des êtres humains et des sujets de droits. Leur dig­nité et leur droit à la vie doivent être respec­tés dès le pre­mier moment de leur exis­tence. Il est immoral de pro­duire des embryons humains des­tinés à être exploités comme un « matéri­au biologique » disponible.

Dans la pra­tique habituelle de la fécon­da­tion in vit­ro, tous les embryons ne sont pas trans­férés dans le corps de la femme; cer­tains sont détru­its. Aus­si, comme elle con­damne l’a­vorte­ment provo­qué, l’Église inter­dit égale­ment d’at­ten­ter à la vie de ces êtres humains. Il faut dénon­cer la par­ti­c­ulière grav­ité de la destruc­tion volon­taire des embryons humains obtenus « in vit­ro » par fécon­da­tion arti­fi­cielle ou « fis­sion gémel­laire » à de seule fins de recherche. En agis­sant ain­si, le chercheur se sub­stitue à Dieu et, même s’il n’en a pas con­science, se fait maître du des­tin d’autrui, puisqu’il choisit arbi­traire­ment qui faire vivre et qui faire mourir, et qu’il sup­prime des êtres humains sans défense.

Les procé­dures d’ob­ser­va­tion ou d’ex­péri­men­ta­tion qui causent un dom­mage ou imposent des risques graves et dis­pro­por­tion­nés aux embryons obtenus in vit­ro sont, pour les mêmes raisons, morale­ment illicites. Tout être humain est à respecter pour lui-même; il ne peut être pure­ment et sim­ple­ment réduit à sa valeur d’usage au béné­fice d’autrui.

Il n’est donc pas con­forme à la moral­ité d’ex­pos­er délibéré­ment à la mort des embryons humains obtenus « in vit­ro ». Par le fait qu’ils ont été pro­duits in vit­ro, ces embryons non trans­férés dans le corps de la mère, et qual­i­fiés de « sur­numéraires », demeurent exposés à un sort absurde, sans qu’il soit pos­si­ble de leur don­ner des voies de survie cer­taines et licite­ment réalisables.

  1. Quel juge­ment porter sur les autres procèdes de manip­u­la­tion des embryons lies aux « tech­niques de repro­duc­tion humaine »?

Les tech­niques de fécon­da­tion in vit­ro peu­vent ren­dre pos­si­bles d’autres formes de manip­u­la­tion biologique ou géné­tique des embryons humains telles que: les ten­ta­tives ou pro­jets de fécon­da­tion entre gamètes humains et ani­maux, et de ges­ta­tion d’embryons humains dans des utérus d’an­i­maux; l’hy­pothèse ou le pro­jet de con­struc­tion d’utérus arti­fi­ciels pour l’embryon humain. Ces procédés sont con­traires à la dig­nité d’être humain qui appar­tient à l’embryon, et en même temps, ils lèsent le droit de toute per­son­ne à être conçue et à naître dans le mariage et du mariage [32]. Même les ten­ta­tives ou les hypothès­es faites pour obtenir un être humain sans aucune con­nex­ion avec la sex­u­al­ité, par « fis­sion gémel­laire », clon­age, parthéno­genèse, sont à con­sid­ér­er comme con­traires à la morale, car elles sont en oppo­si­tion avec la dig­nité tant de la pro­créa­tion humaine que de l’u­nion conjugale.

La con­géla­tion des embryons, même si elle est réal­isée pour garan­tir une con­ser­va­tion de l’embryon en vie (« cry­ocon­ser­va­tion »), con­stitue une offense au respect dû aux êtres humains, car elle les expose à de graves risques de mort ou d’at­teinte à leur intégrité physique; elle les prive au moins tem­po­raire­ment de l’ac­cueil et de la ges­ta­tion mater­nelle, et les place dans une sit­u­a­tion sus­cep­ti­ble d’of­fens­es et de manip­u­la­tions ultérieures.

Cer­taines ten­ta­tives d’in­ter­ven­tion sur le pat­ri­moine chro­mo­somique ou géné­tique ne sont pas thérapeu­tiques, mais ten­dent à la pro­duc­tion d’êtres humains sélec­tion­nés selon le sexe ou d’autres qual­ités préétablies. Ces manip­u­la­tions sont con­traires à la dig­nité per­son­nelle de l’être humain, à son intégrité et à son iden­tité. Elles ne peu­vent donc en aucune manière être jus­ti­fiées par d’éventuelles con­séquences béné­fiques pour l’hu­man­ité future [33]. Toute per­son­ne doit être respec­tée pour elle-même: en cela con­siste la dig­nité et le droit de tout être humain depuis son origine.

II

INTERVENTIONS SUR LA PROCRÉATION HUMAINE

Par « pro­créa­tion arti­fi­cielle » ou « fécon­da­tion arti­fi­cielle », on entend ici les divers­es procé­dures tech­niques des­tinées à obtenir une con­cep­tion humaine d’une manière autre que par l’u­nion sex­uelle de l’homme et de la femme. L’In­struc­tion traite de la fécon­da­tion d’un ovule en éprou­vette (fécon­da­tion in vit­ro) et de l’in­sémi­na­tion arti­fi­cielle moyen­nant trans­fert, dans les organes géni­taux de la femme, du sperme précédem­ment recueilli.

Un point prélim­i­naire à l’ap­pré­ci­a­tion morale de ces tech­niques est con­sti­tué par la con­sid­éra­tion des cir­con­stances et des con­séquences qu’elles com­por­tent par rap­port au respect dû à l’embryon humain. L’ex­ten­sion de la pra­tique de la fécon­da­tion in vit­ro a néces­sité d’in­nom­brables fécon­da­tions et destruc­tions d’embryons humains. Aujour­d’hui encore, elle pré­sup­pose habituelle­ment une surovu­la­tion de la femme: plusieurs ovules sont prélevés, fécondés et cul­tivés ensuite in vit­ro pen­dant quelques jours. Habituelle­ment, tous ne sont pas trans­férés dans les organes géni­taux de la femme; cer­tains embryons, appelés ordi­naire­ment « sur­numéraires », sont détru­its ou con­gelés. Par­mi les embryons implan­tés, cer­tains sont sac­ri­fiés pour divers­es raisons eugéniques, économiques ou psy­chologiques. Cette destruc­tion volon­taire d’être humains ou leur util­i­sa­tion à divers­es fins, au détri­ment de leur intégrité et de leur vie, est con­traire à la doc­trine déjà rap­pelée à pro­pos de l’a­vorte­ment provoqué.

Le rap­port entre fécon­da­tion in vit­ro et élim­i­na­tion volon­taire d’embryons humains se véri­fie trop fréquem­ment. Ceci est sig­ni­fi­catif: avec ces procédés, aux final­ités apparem­ment opposées, la vie et la mort sont soumis­es aux déci­sions de l’homme, qui en vient ain­si à se con­stituer dona­teur de vie et de mort sur com­mande. Cette dynamique de vio­lence et de dom­i­na­tion peut n’être pas perçue par eux-mêmes qui, en voulant l’u­tilis­er, s’y assu­jet­tis­sent. Les don­nées de fait rap­pelées et la froide logique qui les relie doivent être pris­es en con­sid­éra­tion pour un juge­ment moral sur la FIVETE (fécon­da­tion in vit­ro et trans­fert de l’embryon): la men­tal­ité abortive qui l’a ren­due pos­si­ble con­duit ain­si, qu’on le veuille ou non, à une dom­i­na­tion de l’homme sur la vie et sur la mort de ses sem­blables, qui peut con­duire à un eugénisme radical.

Des abus de ce genre ne dis­pensent cepen­dant pas d’une réflex­ion éthique ultérieure et appro­fondie sur les tech­niques de pro­créa­tion arti­fi­cielle con­sid­érées en elles-mêmes, abstrac­tion faite autant que pos­si­ble de la destruc­tion des embryons pro­duits in vit­ro.

La présente Instruc­tion pren­dra donc en con­sid­éra­tion tout d’abord les prob­lèmes posés par la fécon­da­tion arti­fi­cielle hétéro­logue (II, 1–3),* puis ceux qui sont liés à la fécon­da­tion arti­fi­cielle homo­logue (II, 4–6).**

Avant de for­muler un juge­ment éthique sur cha­cune d’elles, on exposera les principes et les valeurs qui déter­mi­nent l’ap­pré­ci­a­tion morale de cha­cune de ces procédures.

* L’In­struc­tion entend, sous la dénom­i­na­tion de Fécon­da­tion ou pro­créa­tion arti­fi­cielle hétéro­logue, les tech­niques des­tinée à obtenir arti­fi­cielle­ment une con­cep­tion humaine à par­tir de gamètes provenant d’au moins un don­neur autre que les époux qui sont unis en mariage. Ces tech­niques peu­vent être de deux types:

  1. a) FIVETE hétéro­logue: tech­nique des­tinée à obtenir une con­cep­tion humaine par la ren­con­tre in vit­ro de gamètes prélevés sur au moins un don­neur autre que les époux unis par le mariage.
  2. b) Insémi­na­tion arti­fi­cielle hétéro­logue: tech­nique des­tinée à obtenir une con­cep­tion humaine par le trans­fert dans les organes géni­taux de la femme du sperme précédem­ment recueil­li sur un don­neur autre que le mari.

** L’In­struc­tion entend par Fécon­da­tion ou pro­créa­tion arti­fi­cielle homo­logue la tech­nique des­tinée à obtenir une con­cep­tion humaine à par­tir des gamètes de deux époux unis en mariage. La fécon­da­tion arti­fi­cielle homo­logue peut être réal­isée par deux méth­odes diverses:

  1. a) FIVETE homo­logue: tech­nique des­tinée à obtenir une con­cep­tion humaine par la ren­con­tre in vit­ro des gamètes des époux unis en mariage.
  2. b) Insémi­na­tion arti­fi­cielle homo­logue: tech­nique des­tinée à obtenir une con­cep­tion humaine par le trans­fert dans les organes géni­taux d’une femme mar­iée du sperme de son mari précédem­ment recueilli.

A
FÉCONDATION ARTIFICIELLE HÉTÉROLOGUE

  1. Pourquoi la pro­créa­tion humaine doit-elle avoir lieu dans le mariage?

Tout être humain doit être accueil­li comme un don et une béné­dic­tion de Dieu. Cepen­dant, du point de vue moral, une pro­créa­tion vrai­ment respon­s­able à l’égard de l’enfant à naître doit être le fruit du mariage.

La pro­créa­tion humaine pos­sède en effet des car­ac­téris­tiques spé­ci­fiques en ver­tu de la dig­nité per­son­nelle des par­ents et des enfants: la pro­créa­tion d’une per­son­ne nou­velle, par laque­lle l’homme et la femme col­la­borent avec la puis­sance du Créa­teur, devra être le fruit et le signe de la dona­tion mutuelle et per­son­nelle des époux, de leur amour et de leur fidél­ité [34]. La fidél­ité des époux, dans l’u­nité du mariage, com­porte le respect réciproque de leur droit à devenir père et mère seule­ment l’un par l’autre.

L’en­fant a droit d’être conçu, porté, mis au monde et éduqué dans le mariage: c’est par la référence assurée et recon­nue à ses par­ents qu’il peut décou­vrir son iden­tité et mûrir sa pro­pre for­ma­tion humaine.

Les par­ents trou­vent dans l’en­fant une con­fir­ma­tion et un accom­plisse­ment de leur dona­tion réciproque: il est l’im­age vivante de leur amour, le signe per­ma­nent de leur union con­ju­gale, la syn­thèse vivante et indis­sol­u­ble de leur dimen­sion pater­nelle et mater­nelle [35].

En ver­tu de la voca­tion et des respon­s­abil­ités sociales de la per­son­ne, le bien des enfants et des par­ents con­tribue au bien de la société civile; la vital­ité et l’équili­bre de la société deman­dent que les enfants vien­nent au monde au sein d’une famille, et que celle-ci soit fondée sur le mariage d’une manière stable.

La tra­di­tion de l’Église et la réflex­ion anthro­pologique recon­nais­sent dans le mariage et dans son unité indis­sol­u­ble le seul lieu digne d’une pro­créa­tion vrai­ment responsable.

  1. La fécon­da­tion arti­fi­cielle hétéro­logue est-elle con­forme a la dig­nité des époux et a la vérité du mariage ?

Dans la FIVETE et l’in­sémi­na­tion arti­fi­cielle hétéro­logue, la con­cep­tion humaine est obtenue par la ren­con­tre des gamètes d’au moins un don­neur autre que les époux unis dans le mariage. La fécon­da­tion arti­fi­cielle hétéro­logue est con­traire à l’u­nité du mariage, à la dig­nité des époux, à la voca­tion pro­pre des par­ents et au droit de l’en­fant à être conçu et mis au monde dans le mariage et par le mariage [36].

Le respect de l’u­nité du mariage et de la fidél­ité con­ju­gale exige que l’en­fant soit conçu dans le mariage; le lien entre les con­joints attribue aux époux, de manière objec­tive et inal­ién­able, le droit exclusif à ne devenir père et mère que l’un par l’autre [37]. Le recours aux gamètes d’une tierce per­son­ne, pour dis­pos­er du sperme ou de l’ovule, con­stitue une vio­la­tion de l’en­gage­ment réciproque des époux et un man­que­ment grave à l’u­nité, pro­priété essen­tielle du mariage.

La fécon­da­tion arti­fi­cielle hétéro­logue lèse les droits de l’en­fant, le prive de la rela­tion fil­iale à ses orig­ines parentales, et peut faire obsta­cle à la mat­u­ra­tion de son iden­tité per­son­nelle. Elle con­stitue en out­re une offense à la voca­tion com­mune des époux appelés à la pater­nité et à la mater­nité; elle prive objec­tive­ment la fécon­dité con­ju­gale de son unité et de son intégrité; elle opère et man­i­feste une rup­ture entre par­en­té géné­tique, par­en­té « ges­ta­tion­nelle » et respon­s­abil­ité éduca­tive. Cette altéra­tion des rela­tions per­son­nelles à l’in­térieur de la famille se réper­cute dans la société civile: ce qui men­ace l’u­nité et la sta­bil­ité de la famille est source de dis­sen­sions, de désor­dre et d’in­jus­tices dans toute la vie sociale.

Ces raisons con­duisent à un juge­ment moral négatif sur la fécon­da­tion arti­fi­cielle hétéro­logue: sont donc morale­ment illicites la fécon­da­tion d’une femme mar­iée par le sperme d’un don­neur autre que son mari, et la fécon­da­tion par le sperme du mari d’un ovule qui ne provient pas de son épouse. En out­re, la fécon­da­tion arti­fi­cielle d’une femme non mar­iée, céli­bataire ou veuve, quel que soit le don­neur, ne peut être morale­ment justifiée.

Le désir d’avoir un enfant, l’amour entre les époux qui souhait­ent remédi­er à une stéril­ité autrement insur­montable, con­stituent des moti­va­tions com­préhen­si­bles; mais les inten­tions sub­jec­tive­ment bonnes ne ren­dent la fécon­da­tion arti­fi­cielle hétéro­logue ni con­forme aux pro­priétés objec­tives et inal­ién­ables du mariage, ni respectueuse des droits de l’en­fant et des époux.

  1. La mater­nité « de sub­sti­tu­tion »* est-elle morale­ment licite ?

Non, pour les mêmes raisons qui con­duisent à refuser la fécon­da­tion arti­fi­cielle hétéro­logue: elle est en effet con­traire à l’u­nité du mariage et à la dig­nité de la pro­créa­tion de la per­son­ne humaine.

La mater­nité de sub­sti­tu­tion représente un man­que­ment objec­tif aux oblig­a­tions de l’amour mater­nel, de la fidél­ité con­ju­gale et de la mater­nité respon­s­able; elle offense la dig­nité de l’en­fant et son droit à être conçu, porté, mis au monde et éduqué par ses pro­pres par­ents; elle instau­re, au détri­ment des familles, une divi­sion entre les élé­ments physiques, psy­chiques et moraux qui les constituent.

* Sous l’ap­pel­la­tion de « mère sub­sti­tu­tive », l’In­struc­tion entend désigner:

  1. a) la femme qui porte un embry­on implan­té dans son utérus, mais qui lui est géné­tique­ment étranger, parce qu’obtenu par l’u­nion des gamètes de « don­neurs », — avec l’en­gage­ment de remet­tre l’en­fant une fois né à la per­son­ne ayant com­mis­sion­né ou stip­ulé cette gestation;
  2. b) la femme qui porte un embry­on à la pro­créa­tion duquel elle a con­tribué par le don d’un ovule, fécondé par insémi­na­tion arti­fi­cielle avec le sperme d’un homme autre que son mari, — avec l’en­gage­ment de remet­tre l’en­fant une fois né à la per­son­ne ayant com­mis­sion­né ou stip­ulé cette gestation.

B
FÉCONDATION ARTIFICIELLE HOMOLOGUE

Une fois déclarée inac­cept­able la fécon­da­tion arti­fi­cielle hétéro­logue, on doit se deman­der com­ment appréci­er morale­ment les procédés de fécon­da­tion arti­fi­cielle homo­logue: FIVETE et insémi­na­tion arti­fi­cielle entre époux. Il con­vient aupar­a­vant d’é­clair­cir une ques­tion de principe.

  1. Quel lien est morale­ment req­uis entre pro­créa­tion et acte conjugal?
  2. a) L’en­seigne­ment de l’Église sur le mariage et la pro­créa­tion humaine affirme « le lien indis­sol­u­ble que Dieu a voulu, et que l’homme ne peut rompre de sa pro­pre ini­tia­tive, entre les deux sig­ni­fi­ca­tions de l’acte con­ju­gal: union et pro­créa­tion. En fait, par sa struc­ture intime, l’acte con­ju­gal, unis­sant les époux par un lien très pro­fond, les rend aptes à la généra­tion de nou­velles vies, selon les lois inscrites dans l’être même de l’homme et de la femme » [38]. Ce principe, fondé sur la nature du mariage et la con­nex­ion intime de ses biens, entraîne des con­séquences bien con­nues sur le plan de la pater­nité et de la mater­nité respon­s­ables: « C’est en sauve­g­ar­dant les deux aspects essen­tiels, union et pro­créa­tion, que l’acte con­ju­gal con­serve inté­grale­ment le sens d’amour mutuel et véri­ta­ble, et son ordi­na­tion à la très haute voca­tion de l’homme à la pater­nité » [39].

La même doc­trine rel­a­tive au lien entre les sig­ni­fi­ca­tions de l’acte con­ju­gal et les biens du mariage éclaire le prob­lème moral de la fécon­da­tion arti­fi­cielle homo­logue, car « il n’est jamais per­mis de sépar­er ces divers aspects au point d’ex­clure pos­i­tive­ment soit l’in­ten­tion pro­créa­trice, soit le rap­port con­ju­gal » [40].

La con­tra­cep­tion, prive inten­tion­nelle­ment l’acte con­ju­gal de son ouver­ture à la pro­créa­tion, et opère par là une dis­so­ci­a­tion volon­taire des final­ités du mariage. La fécon­da­tion arti­fi­cielle homo­logue, en recher­chant une pro­créa­tion qui n’est pas le fruit d’un acte spé­ci­fique de l’u­nion con­ju­gale, opère objec­tive­ment une sépa­ra­tion ana­logue entre les biens et les sig­ni­fi­ca­tions du mariage.

C’est pourquoi la fécon­da­tion est licite­ment voulue quand elle est le terme d’un « acte con­ju­gal apte de soi à la généra­tion, auquel le mariage est des­tiné par sa nature et par lequel les époux devi­en­nent une seule chair » [41]. Mais la pro­créa­tion est morale­ment privée de sa per­fec­tion pro­pre quand elle n’est pas voulue comme le fruit de l’acte con­ju­gal, c’est-à-dire du geste spé­ci­fique de l’u­nion des époux.

  1. b) La valeur morale du lien intime entre les biens du mariage et les sig­ni­fi­ca­tions de l’acte con­ju­gal se fonde sur l’u­nité de l’être humain, corps et âme spir­ituelle [42]. Les époux s’ex­pri­ment récipro­que­ment leur amour per­son­nel dans le « lan­gage du corps », qui com­porte claire­ment des « sig­ni­fi­ca­tions spon­sales » en même temps que parentales [43]. L’acte con­ju­gal, par lequel les époux se man­i­fes­tent récipro­que­ment leur don mutuel, exprime aus­si l’ou­ver­ture au don de la vie: il est un acte insé­para­ble­ment cor­porel et spir­ituel. C’est dans leur corps et par leur corps que les époux con­som­ment leur mariage et peu­vent devenir père et mère. Pour respecter le lan­gage des corps et leur générosité naturelle, l’u­nion con­ju­gale doit s’ac­com­plir dans le respect de l’ou­ver­ture à la pro­créa­tion, et la pro­créa­tion d’une per­son­ne humaine doit être le fruit et le terme de l’amour des époux. L’o­rig­ine de l’être humain résulte ain­si d’une pro­créa­tion « liée à l’u­nion non seule­ment biologique mais aus­si spir­ituelle des par­ents unis par le lien du mariage » [44]. Une fécon­da­tion obtenue en dehors du corps des époux demeure par là même privée des sig­ni­fi­ca­tions et des valeurs qui s’ex­pri­ment dans le lan­gage du corps et l’u­nion des per­son­nes humaines.
  2. c) Seul le respect du lien qui existe entre les sig­ni­fi­ca­tions de l’acte con­ju­gal et le respect de l’u­nité de l’être humain per­met une pro­créa­tion con­forme à la dig­nité de la per­son­ne. Dans son orig­ine unique, non réitérable, l’en­fant devra être respec­té et recon­nu égal en dig­nité per­son­nelle à ceux qui lui don­nent la vie. La per­son­ne humaine doit être accueil­lie dans le geste d’u­nion et d’amour de ses par­ents; la généra­tion d’un enfant devra donc être le fruit de la dona­tion réciproque [45] qui se réalise dans l’acte con­ju­gal où les époux coopèrent, comme des servi­teurs et non comme des maîtres, à l’œu­vre de l’Amour Créa­teur [46].

L’o­rig­ine d’une per­son­ne est en réal­ité le résul­tat d’une dona­tion. L’en­fant à naître devra être le fruit de l’amour de ses par­ents. Il ne peut être ni voulu ni conçu comme le pro­duit d’une inter­ven­tion de tech­niques médi­cales et biologiques; cela reviendrait à le réduire à devenir l’ob­jet d’une tech­nolo­gie sci­en­tifique. Nul ne peut soumet­tre la venue au monde d’un enfant à des con­di­tions d’ef­fi­cac­ité tech­nique mesurées selon des paramètres de con­trôle et de domination.

L’im­por­tance morale du lien entre les sig­ni­fi­ca­tions de l’acte con­ju­gal et les biens du mariage, l’u­nité d,e l’être humain et la dig­nité de son orig­ine, exi­gent que la pro­créa­tion d’une per­son­ne humaine doive être pour­suiv­ie comme le fruit de l’acte con­ju­gal spé­ci­fique de l’amour des époux. Le lien exis­tant entre pro­créa­tion et acte con­ju­gal se révèle donc d’une grande portée sur le plan anthro­pologique et moral, et il éclaire les posi­tions du Mag­istère à pro­pos de la fécon­da­tion arti­fi­cielle homologue.

  1. La fécon­da­tion homo­logue « in vit­ro » est-elle morale­ment licite ?

La réponse à cette ques­tion est stricte­ment dépen­dante des principes qui vien­nent d’être rap­pelés. Assuré­ment, on ne peut pas ignor­er les légitimes aspi­ra­tions des époux stériles; pour cer­tains, le recours à la FIVETE homo­logue sem­ble l’u­nique moyen d’obtenir un enfant sincère­ment désiré: on se demande si dans ces sit­u­a­tions, la glob­al­ité de la vie con­ju­gale ne suf­fit pas à assur­er la dig­nité qui con­vient à la pro­créa­tion humaine. On recon­naît que la FIVETE ne peut cer­taine­ment pas sup­pléer à l’ab­sence des rap­ports con­ju­gaux [47] et ne peut pas être préférée, vu les risques qui peu­vent se pro­duire pour l’en­fant et les désagré­ments de la procé­dure, aux actes spé­ci­fiques de l’u­nion con­ju­gale. Mais on se demande égale­ment si, dans l’im­pos­si­bil­ité de remédi­er autrement à la stéril­ité, cause de souf­france, la fécon­da­tion homo­logue in vit­ro ne peut pas con­stituer une aide, sinon même une thérapie, dont la licéité morale pour­rait être admise.

Le désir d’un enfant — ou du moins la disponi­bil­ité à trans­met­tre la vie — est une requête morale­ment néces­saire à une pro­créa­tion humaine respon­s­able. Mais cette inten­tion bonne ne suf­fit pas pour don­ner une appré­ci­a­tion morale pos­i­tive sur la fécon­da­tion in vit­ro entre époux. Le procédé de la FIVETE doit être jugé en lui-même, et ne peut emprunter sa qual­i­fi­ca­tion morale défini­tive ni à l’ensem­ble de la vie con­ju­gale dans laque­lle il s’in­scrit, ni aux actes con­ju­gaux qui peu­vent le précéder ou le suiv­re [48].

On a déjà rap­pelé que dans les cir­con­stances où elle est habituelle­ment pra­tiquée, la FIVETE implique la destruc­tion d’être humains, fait con­traire à la doc­trine citée plus haut sur l’il­licéité de l’a­vorte­ment [49]. Pour­tant, même dans le cas où toute pré­cau­tion serait prise pour éviter la mort d’embryons humains, la FIVETE homo­logue réalise la dis­so­ci­a­tion des gestes qui sont des­tinés à la fécon­da­tion humaine par l’acte con­ju­gal. La nature pro­pre de la FIVETE homo­logue devra donc aus­si être con­sid­érée, abstrac­tion faite du lien avec l’a­vorte­ment provoqué.

La FIVETE homo­logue est opérée en dehors du corps des con­joints, par des gestes de tierces per­son­nes dont la com­pé­tence et l’ac­tiv­ité tech­nique déter­mi­nent le suc­cès de l’in­ter­ven­tion; elle remet la vie et l’i­den­tité de l’embryon au pou­voir des médecins et des biol­o­gistes, et instau­re une dom­i­na­tion de la tech­nique sur l’o­rig­ine et la des­tinée de la per­son­ne humaine. Une telle rela­tion de dom­i­na­tion est de soi con­traire à la dig­nité et à l’é­gal­ité qui doivent être com­munes aux par­ents et aux enfants.

La con­cep­tion in vit­ro est le résul­tat de l’ac­tion tech­nique qui pré­side à la fécon­da­tion; elle n’est ni effec­tive­ment obtenue, ni pos­i­tive­ment voulue, comme l’expression et le fruit d’un acte spé­ci­fique de l’u­nion con­ju­gale. Donc dans la FIVETE homo­logue, même con­sid­érée dans le con­texte de rap­ports con­ju­gaux effec­tifs, la généra­tion de la per­son­ne humaine est objec­tive­ment privée de sa per­fec­tion pro­pre: celle d’être le terme et le fruit d’un acte con­ju­gal, dans lequel les époux peu­vent devenir « coopéra­teurs de Dieu pour le don de la vie à une autre nou­velle per­son­ne » [50].

Ces raisons per­me­t­tent de com­pren­dre pourquoi l’acte de l’amour con­ju­gal est con­sid­éré dans l’en­seigne­ment de l’Église comme l’u­nique lieu digne de la pro­créa­tion humaine. Pour les mêmes raisons, le « sim­ple case », c’est-à-dire une procé­dure de FIVETE homo­logue puri­fiée de toute com­pro­mis­sion avec la pra­tique abortive de la destruc­tion d’embryons et avec la mas­tur­ba­tion, demeure une tech­nique morale­ment illicite, parce qu’elle prive la pro­créa­tion humaine de la dig­nité qui lui est pro­pre et connaturelle.

Certes, la FIVETE homo­logue n’est pas affec­tée de toute la néga­tiv­ité éthique qui se ren­con­tre dans la pro­créa­tion extra-con­ju­gale; la famille et le mariage con­tin­u­ent à con­stituer le cadre de la nais­sance et de l’é­d­u­ca­tion des enfants. Cepen­dant, en con­for­mité avec la doc­trine tra­di­tion­nelle sur les biens du mariage et la dig­nité de la per­son­ne, l’Église demeure con­traire, du point de vue moral, à la fécon­da­tion homo­logue in vit­ro; celle-ci est en elle-même illicite et opposée à la dig­nité de la pro­créa­tion et de l’u­nion con­ju­gale, même quand tout est mis en œuvre pour éviter la mort de l’embryon humain.

Bien qu’on ne puisse pas approu­ver la modal­ité par laque­lle est obtenue la con­cep­tion humaine dans la FIVETE, tout enfant qui vient au monde devra cepen­dant être accueil­li comme un don vivant de la Bon­té divine et être éduqué avec amour.

  1. Com­ment appréci­er morale­ment l’in­sémi­na­tion arti­fi­cielle homologue?

L’in­sémi­na­tion arti­fi­cielle homo­logue à l’in­térieur du mariage ne peut être admise, sauf dans le cas ou le moyen tech­nique ne se sub­stitue pas à l’acte con­ju­gal, mais appa­raît comme une facil­ité et une aide pour que celui-ci rejoigne sa fin naturelle.

L’en­seigne­ment du Mag­istère à ce sujet a déjà été explic­ité [51]: il n’est pas seule­ment expres­sion de cir­con­stances his­toriques par­ti­c­ulières, mais se fonde sur la doc­trine de l’Église au sujet du lien entre union con­ju­gale et pro­créa­tion, et sur la con­sid­éra­tion de la nature per­son­nelle de l’acte con­ju­gal et de la pro­créa­tion humaine. « L’acte con­ju­gal dans sa struc­ture naturelle est une action per­son­nelle, une coopéra­tion simul­tanée et immé­di­ate des époux, laque­lle, du fait même de la nature des agents et du car­ac­tère de l’acte, est l’ex­pres­sion du don réciproque qui, selon la parole de l’Écri­t­ure, réalise l’u­nion en une seule chair » [52]. Pour autant, la con­science morale « ne pro­scrit pas néces­saire­ment l’emploi de cer­tains moyens arti­fi­ciels des­tinés unique­ment soit à faciliter l’acte naturel, soit à faire attein­dre sa fin à l’acte naturel nor­male­ment accom­pli » [53]. Si le moyen tech­nique facilite l’acte con­ju­gal ou l’aide à attein­dre ses objec­tifs naturels, il peut être morale­ment admis. Quand, au con­traire, l’in­ter­ven­tion se sub­stitue à l’acte con­ju­gal, elle est morale­ment illicite.

L’in­sémi­na­tion arti­fi­cielle sub­sti­tu­ant l’acte con­ju­gal est pro­scrite en ver­tu de la dis­so­ci­a­tion volon­taire­ment opérée entre les deux sig­ni­fi­ca­tions de l’acte con­ju­gal. La mas­tur­ba­tion, par laque­lle on se pro­cure habituelle­ment le sperme, est un autre signe de cette dis­so­ci­a­tion: même quand il est posé en vue de la pro­créa­tion, le geste demeure privé de sa sig­ni­fi­ca­tion uni­tive. « Il lui manque […] la rela­tion sex­uelle req­uise par l’or­dre moral, celle qui réalise, “dans le con­texte d’un amour vrai, le sens inté­gral de la dona­tion mutuelle et de la pro­créa­tion humaine” » [54].

  1. Quel critère moral pro­pos­er quant a l’in­ter­ven­tion du médecin dans la pro­créa­tion humaine ?

L’acte médi­cal ne doit pas être appré­cié seule­ment par rap­port à sa seule dimen­sion tech­nique, mais aus­si et surtout en rela­tion à sa final­ité, qui est le bien des per­son­nes et leur san­té cor­porelle et psy­chique. Les critères moraux pour l’in­ter­ven­tion médi­cale dans la pro­créa­tion se déduisent de la dig­nité des per­son­nes humaines, de leur sex­u­al­ité et de leur origine.

La médecine, qui se veut ordon­née au bien inté­gral de la per­son­ne, doit respecter les valeurs spé­ci­fique­ment humaines de la sex­u­al­ité [55]. Le médecin est au ser­vice des per­son­nes et de la pro­créa­tion humaine: il n’a pas le pou­voir de dis­pos­er d’elles ni de décider à leur sujet. L’in­ter­ven­tion médi­cale est respectueuse de la dig­nité des per­son­nes quand elle vise à aider l’acte con­ju­gal, soit pour en faciliter l’ac­com­plisse­ment, soit pour lui per­me­t­tre d’at­tein­dre sa fin, une fois qu’il a été nor­male­ment accom­pli [56].

Au con­traire, il arrive par­fois que l’in­ter­ven­tion médi­cale se sub­stitue tech­nique­ment à l’acte con­ju­gal pour obtenir une pro­créa­tion qui n’est ni son résul­tat ni son fruit: dans ce cas, l’acte médi­cal n’est pas, comme il le devrait, au ser­vice de l’u­nion con­ju­gale, mais il s’en attribue la fonc­tion pro­créa­trice et ain­si con­tred­it la dig­nité et les droits inal­ién­ables des époux et de l’en­fant à naître.

L’hu­man­i­sa­tion de la médecine, qui est de nos jours instam­ment réclamée par tous, exige le respect de la dig­nité inté­grale de la per­son­ne humaine, en pre­mier lieu dans l’acte et au moment où les époux trans­met­tent la vie à une per­son­ne nou­velle. Il est donc logique d’adress­er aus­si une pres­sante demande aux médecins et aux chercheurs catholiques, pour qu’ils témoignent exem­plaire­ment du respect dû à l’embryon humain et à la dig­nité de la pro­créa­tion. Le per­son­nel médi­cal et soignant des hôpi­taux et des clin­iques catholiques est invité d’une manière spé­ciale à hon­or­er les oblig­a­tions morales con­trac­tées, sou­vent même à titre statu­taire. Les respon­s­ables de ces hôpi­taux et clin­iques catholiques, qui sont sou­vent des religieux, auront à cœur d’as­sur­er et de pro­mou­voir l’ob­ser­va­tion atten­tive des normes morales rap­pelées dans la présente Instruction.

  1. La souf­france provenant de la stéril­ité conjugale.

La souf­france des époux qui ne peu­vent avoir d’en­fants ou qui craig­nent de met­tre au monde un enfant hand­i­capé est une souf­france que tous doivent com­pren­dre et appréci­er comme il convient.

De la part des époux, le désir d’un enfant est naturel: il exprime la voca­tion à la pater­nité et à la mater­nité inscrite dans l’amour con­ju­gal. Ce désir peut être plus vif encore si le cou­ple est frap­pé d’une stéril­ité qui sem­ble incur­able. Cepen­dant, le mariage ne con­fère pas aux époux un droit à avoir un enfant, mais seule­ment le droit de pos­er les actes naturels ordon­nés de soi à la pro­créa­tion [57].

Un droit véri­ta­ble et strict à l’en­fant serait con­traire à sa dig­nité et à sa nature. L’enfant n’est un dû et il ne peut être con­sid­éré comme objet de pro­priété: il est plutôt un don — « le plus grand » [58] — et le plus gra­tu­it du mariage, témoignage vivant de la dona­tion réciproque de ses par­ents. A ce titre, l’en­fant a le droit comme on l’a rap­pelé d’être le fruit de l’acte spé­ci­fique de l’amour con­ju­gal de ses par­ents, et aus­si le droit d’être respec­té comme per­son­ne dès le moment de sa conception.

Toute­fois la stéril­ité, quelles qu’en soient la cause et le pronos­tic, est cer­taine­ment une dure épreuve. La com­mu­nauté des croy­ants est appelée à éclair­er et à soutenir la souf­france de ceux qui ne peu­vent réalis­er une légitime aspi­ra­tion à la pater­nité et à la mater­nité. Les époux qui se trou­vent dans ces sit­u­a­tions douloureuses sont appelés à y décou­vrir l’oc­ca­sion d’une par­tic­i­pa­tion par­ti­c­ulière à la Croix du Seigneur, source de fécon­dité spir­ituelle. Les cou­ples stériles ne doivent pas oubli­er que « même quand la pro­créa­tion n’est pas pos­si­ble, la vie con­ju­gale ne perd pas pour autant sa valeur. La stéril­ité physique peut être l’oc­ca­sion pour les époux de ren­dre d’autres ser­vices impor­tants à la vie des per­son­nes humaines, tels par exem­ple que l’adop­tion, les formes divers­es d’œu­vres éduca­tives, l’aide à d’autre familles, aux enfants pau­vres ou hand­i­capés » [59].

De nom­breux chercheurs se sont engagés dans la lutte con­tre la stéril­ité. Tout en sauve­g­ar­dant pleine­ment la dig­nité de la pro­créa­tion humaine, cer­tains sont arrivés à des résul­tats qui sem­blaient aupar­a­vant impos­si­bles à attein­dre. Les hommes de sci­ence doivent dont être encour­agés à pour­suiv­re leurs recherch­es, afin de prévenir les caus­es de la stéril­ité et de pou­voir la guérir, de sorte que les cou­ples stériles puis­sent réus­sir à pro­créer dans le respect de leur dig­nité per­son­nelle et de celle de l’en­fant à naître.
III
MORALE ET LOI CIVILE

VALEURS ET OBLIGATIONS MORALES QUE LA LEGISLATION CIVILE DOIT RESPECTER ET SANCTIONNER EN CETTE MATIÈRE

Le droit invi­o­lable à la vie de tout indi­vidu humain inno­cent, les droits de la famille et de l’in­sti­tu­tion mat­ri­mo­ni­ale, con­stituent des valeurs morales fon­da­men­tales, car elles con­cer­nent la con­di­tion naturelle et la voca­tion inté­grale de la per­son­ne humaine; en même temps, ce sont des élé­ments con­sti­tu­tifs de la société civile et de sa législation.

Pour cette rai­son, les nou­velles pos­si­bil­ités tech­nologiques, qui se sont ouvertes dans le champ de la bio­médecine, appel­lent l’in­ter­ven­tion des autorités poli­tiques et du lég­is­la­teur, car un recours incon­trôlé à ces tech­niques pour­rait con­duire à des con­séquences imprévis­i­bles et dan­gereuses pour la société civile. La référence à la con­science de cha­cun et à l’au­todis­ci­pline des chercheurs ne peut suf­fire au respect des droits per­son­nels et de l’or­dre pub­lic. Si le lég­is­la­teur, respon­s­able du bien com­mun, man­quait de vig­i­lance, il pour­rait être dépouil­lé de ses prérog­a­tives par des chercheurs qui pré­tendraient gou­vern­er l’hu­man­ité au nom des décou­vertes biologiques et des pré­ten­dus proces­sus d’« amélio­ra­tion » qui en dériveraient. L’« eugénisme » et les dis­crim­i­na­tions entre les êtres humains pour­raient s’en trou­ver légitimés: ce qui con­stituerait une vio­lence et une atteinte grave à l’é­gal­ité, à la dig­nité et aux droits fon­da­men­taux de la per­son­ne humaine.

L’in­ter­ven­tion de l’au­torité poli­tique doit s’in­spir­er des principes rationnels qui règ­lent les rap­ports entre la loi civile et la loi morale. La tâche de la loi civile est d’as­sur­er le bien com­mun des per­son­nes par la recon­nais­sance et la défense des droits fon­da­men­taux, la pro­mo­tion de la paix et de la moral­ité publique [60]. En aucun domaine de la vie, la loi civile ne peut se sub­stituer à la con­science, ni dicter des normes sur ce qui échappe à sa com­pé­tence; elle doit par­fois, pour le bien de l’or­dre pub­lic, tolér­er ce qu’elle ne peut inter­dire sans qu’en découle un dom­mage plus grave. Mais les droits inal­ién­ables de la per­son­ne devront être recon­nus et respec­tés par la société civile et l’au­torité poli­tique: ces droits de l’homme ne dépen­dent ni des indi­vidus, ni des par­ents, et ne représen­tent pas même une con­ces­sion de la société et de l’É­tat; ils appar­ti­en­nent à la nature humaine et sont inhérents à la per­son­ne, en rai­son de l’acte créa­teur dont elle tire son origine.

Par­mi ces droits fon­da­men­taux, il faut à ce pro­pos rappeler:

  1. a) le droit à la vie et à l’in­tégrité physique de tout être humain depuis la con­cep­tion jusqu’à la mort;
  2. b) les droits de la famille et de l’in­sti­tu­tion mat­ri­mo­ni­ale, et, dans ce cadre, le droit pour l’en­fant d’être conçu, mis au monde et éduqué par ses parents.

Sur cha­cun de ces deux thèmes, il con­vient de dévelop­per ici quelques con­sid­éra­tions ultérieures.

Dans dif­férents États, des lois ont autorisé la sup­pres­sion directe d’in­no­cents: dans le moment où une loi pos­i­tive prive une caté­gorie d’êtres humains de la pro­tec­tion que la lég­is­la­tion civile doit leur accorder, l’É­tat en vient à nier l’é­gal­ité de tous devant la loi. Quand l’É­tat ne met pas sa force au ser­vice des droits de tous les citoyens, et en par­ti­c­uli­er des plus faibles, les fonde­ments mêmes d’un État de droit se trou­vent men­acés. L’au­torité poli­tique ne peut en con­séquence approu­ver que des êtres humains soient appelés à l’ex­is­tence par des procé­dures qui les exposent aux risques très graves rap­pelés plus haut. La recon­nais­sance éventuelle­ment accordée par la loi pos­i­tive et les autorités poli­tiques aux tech­niques de trans­mis­sion arti­fi­cielle de la vie et aux expéri­men­ta­tions con­nex­es rendrait plus large la brèche ouverte par la légal­i­sa­tion de l’avortement.

Comme con­séquences du respect et de la pro­tec­tion qui doivent être assurés à l’en­fant dès le moment de sa con­cep­tion, la loi devra prévoir des sanc­tions pénales appro­priées pour toute vio­la­tion délibérée de ses droits. La loi ne pour­ra tolér­er — elle devra même expressé­ment pro­scrire — que des êtres humains, fussent-ils au stade embry­on­naire, soient traités comme des objets d’ex­péri­men­ta­tion, mutilés ou détru­its, sous pré­texte qu’ils appa­raî­traient inutiles ou inaptes à se dévelop­per normalement.

L’au­torité poli­tique est tenue de garan­tir à l’in­sti­tu­tion famil­iale, sur laque­lle est fondée la société, la pro­tec­tion juridique à laque­lle celle-ci a droit. Par le fait même qu’elle est au ser­vice des per­son­nes, la société poli­tique devra être aus­si au ser­vice de la famille. La loi civile ne pour­ra accorder sa garantie à des tech­niques de pro­créa­tion arti­fi­cielle qui sup­primeraient, au béné­fice de tierces per­son­nes (médecins, biol­o­gistes, pou­voirs économiques ou gou­verne­men­taux), ce qui con­stitue un droit inhérent à la rela­tion entre les époux; elle ne pour­ra donc pas légalis­er le don de gamètes entre per­son­nes qui ne seraient pas légitime­ment unies en mariage.

La lég­is­la­tion devra en out­re pro­scrire, en ver­tu du sou­tien dû à la famille, les ban­ques d’embryons, l’in­sémi­na­tion post mortem et la mater­nité « de substitution ».

Il est du devoir de l’autorité publique d’a­gir de telle manière que la loi civile soit réglée sur les normes fon­da­men­tales de la loi morale pour tout ce qui con­cerne les droits de l’homme, de la vie humaine et de l’in­sti­tu­tion famil­iale. Les hommes poli­tiques devront, par leur action sur l’opin­ion publique, s’employer à obtenir sur ces points essen­tiels le con­sen­sus le plus vaste pos­si­ble dans la société, et à le con­solid­er là où il ris­querait d’être affaib­li et amoindri.

Dans de nom­breux pays, la lég­is­la­tion sur l’a­vorte­ment et la tolérance juridique des cou­ples non-mar­iés ren­dent plus dif­fi­cile d’obtenir le respect des droits fon­da­men­taux rap­pelés dans cette Instruc­tion. Il faut souhaiter que les États n’as­su­ment pas la respon­s­abil­ité d’ag­graver encore ces sit­u­a­tions d’in­jus­tice sociale­ment dom­mage­ables. Au con­traire, il faut souhaiter que les nations et les États pren­nent con­science de toutes les impli­ca­tions cul­turelles, idéologiques et poli­tiques liées aux tech­niques de pro­créa­tion arti­fi­cielle, et qu’ils sachent trou­ver la sagesse et le courage néces­saires pour pro­mulguer des lois plus justes et plus respectueuses de la vie humaine et de l’in­sti­tu­tion familiale.

De nos jours, la lég­is­la­tion civile de nom­breux États con­fère aux yeux de beau­coup une légiti­ma­tion indue à cer­taines pra­tiques; elle se mon­tre inca­pable de garan­tir une moral­ité con­forme aux exi­gences naturelles de la per­son­ne humaine et aux « lois non écrites » gravées par le Créa­teur dans le cœur de l’homme. Tous les hommes de bonne volon­té doivent s’employer, spé­ciale­ment dans leur milieu pro­fes­sion­nel comme dans l’ex­er­ci­ce de leurs droits civiques, à ce que soient réfor­mées les lois civiles morale­ment inac­cept­a­bles et mod­i­fiées les pra­tiques illicites. En out­re, l’« objec­tion de con­science » face à de telles lois doit être soulevée et recon­nue. Bien plus, com­mence à se pos­er avec acuité à la con­science morale de beau­coup, notam­ment à celle de cer­tains spé­cial­istes des sci­ences bio­médi­cales, l’ex­i­gence d’une résis­tance pas­sive à la légiti­ma­tion de pra­tiques con­traires à la vie et à la dig­nité de l’homme.

CONCLUSION

La dif­fu­sion des tech­nolo­gies d’in­ter­ven­tion sur les proces­sus de la pro­créa­tion humaine soulève de très graves prob­lèmes moraux relat­ifs au respect dû à l’être humain dès sa con­cep­tion et à la dig­nité de la per­son­ne, de sa sex­u­al­ité et de la trans­mis­sion de la vie.

Dans ce Doc­u­ment, la Con­gré­ga­tion pour la Doc­trine de la Foi, exerçant sa charge de pro­mou­voir et de pro­téger l’en­seigne­ment de l’Église dans une matière aus­si grave, adresse un nou­v­el appel pres­sant à tous ceux qui, en rai­son de leur rôle et de leur engage­ment peu­vent exercer une influ­ence pos­i­tive, pour que, dans la famille et dans la société, soit accordé le respect dû à la vie et à l’amour: aux respon­s­ables de la for­ma­tion des con­sciences et de l’opin­ion publique, aux chercheurs et aux pro­fes­sion­nels de la médecine, aux juristes et aux hommes poli­tiques. Elle souhaite que tous com­pren­nent l’in­com­pat­i­bil­ité qui sub­siste entre la recon­nais­sance de la dig­nité de la per­son­ne humaine et le mépris de la vie et de l’amour, entre la foi au Dieu Vivant et la pré­ten­tion de vouloir décider arbi­traire­ment de l’o­rig­ine et du sort d’un être humain.

La Con­gré­ga­tion pour la Doc­trine de la Foi adresse en par­ti­c­uli­er un con­fi­ant appel et un encour­age­ment aux théolo­giens et surtout aux moral­istes, pour qu’ils appro­fondis­sent et ren­dent tou­jours plus acces­si­bles aux fidèles les con­tenus de l’en­seigne­ment du Mag­istère de l’Église, à la lumière d’une anthro­polo­gie solide en matière de sex­u­al­ité et de mariage, dans le con­texte de l’ap­proche inter­dis­ci­plinaire néces­saire. On pour­ra ain­si com­pren­dre tou­jours mieux les raisons et la valid­ité de cet enseigne­ment: en défen­dant l’homme con­tre les excès de son pro­pre pou­voir, l’Église de Dieu lui rap­pelle les titres de sa véri­ta­ble noblesse; c’est seule­ment ain­si qu’on pour­ra assur­er à l’hu­man­ité de demain la pos­si­bil­ité de vivre et d’aimer dans cette dig­nité et cette lib­erté qui dérivent du respect de la vérité. Les indi­ca­tions pré­cis­es don­nées dans la présente Instruc­tion n’en­ten­dent donc pas arrêter l’ef­fort de réflex­ion, mais plutôt en favoris­er une impul­sion nou­velle, dans la fidél­ité con­stante à la doc­trine de l’Église.

A la lumière de la vérité sur le don de la vie humaine et des principes moraux qui en découlent, cha­cun est invité à agir, dans le cadre de la respon­s­abil­ité qui lui est pro­pre, comme le Bon Samar­i­tain, et à recon­naître aus­si comme son prochain le plus petit par­mi les enfants des hommes (cf. Lc 10, 29–37). La parole du Christ trou­ve ici une réso­nance nou­velle et par­ti­c­ulière: « Ce que vous aurez fait au plus petit de mes frères, c’est à Moi que vous l’au­rez fait » (Mt 25, 40).

Le Sou­verain Pon­tife Jean-Paul II, au cours de l’Au­di­ence accordée au Préfet sous­signé après la réu­nion plénière de cette Con­gré­ga­tion, a approu­vé la présente Instruc­tion et en a ordon­né la publication.

A Rome, au siège de la Con­gré­ga­tion pour la Doc­trine de la Foi, le 22 févri­er 1987, en la Fête de la Chaire de Saint Pierre Apôtre.

 

Joseph Card. Ratzinger
Préfet

+ Alber­to Bovone
Archevêque tit. de Césarée de Numidie
Secrétaire

 

[1] Jean-Paul II, Dis­cours aux par­tic­i­pants au 81e Con­grès de la Société Ital­i­enne de Médicine interne et au 82e Con­grès de Chirurgie Générale, 27 octo­bre 1980: AAS 72 (1980) 1126.

[2] Paul VI, Dis­cours à l’Assem­blée Générale des Nations Unies, 4 octo­bre 1965, 1: AAS 57 (1965) 878; Enc. Pop­u­lo­rum Pro­gres­sio, 13: AAS 59 (1967) 263.

[3] Paul VI, Homélie durant la Messe de clô­ture de l’An­née Sainte, 25 décem­bre 1975: AAS 68 (1976) 145; Jean-Paul II, Enc. Dives in Mis­eri­cor­dia, 30: AAS 72 (1980) 1224.

[4] Jean-Paul II, Dis­cours aux par­tic­i­pants à la 35e Assem­blée Générale de l’Association Médi­cale Mon­di­ale, 29 octo­bre 1983: AAS 76 (1984) 390.

[5] Cf. Déc­la­ra­tion Dig­ni­tatis Humanae, 2.

[6] Con­st. past. Gaudi­um et Spes, 22; Jean-Paul II, Enc. Redemp­tor Homin­is, 8: AAS 71 (1979) 270–272.

[7] Cf. Con­st. past. Gaudi­um et Spes, 35.

[8] Con­st. past. Gaudi­um et Spes, 15; cf. aus­si Paul VI, Enc. Pop­u­lo­rum Pro­gres­sio, 20: AAS 59 (1967) 267; Jean-Paul II, Enc. Redemp­tor Homin­is, 15: AAS 71 (1979) 286–289; Exhort. apost. Famil­iaris Con­sor­tio, 8: AAS 74 (1982) 89.

[9] Jean-Paul II, Exhort. apost. Famil­iaris Con­sor­tio, 11: AAS 74 (1982) 92.

[10] Cf. Paul VI, Enc. Humanae Vitae, 10: AAS 60 (1968) 487–488.

[11] Jean-Paul II, Dis­cours aux par­tic­i­pants à la 35e Assem­blée Générale de l’Association Médi­cale Mon­di­ale, 29 octo­bre 1983: AAS 16 (1984) 393.

[12] Cf. Jean-Paul II, Exhort. apost. Famil­iaris Con­sor­tio, 11: AAS 74 (1982) 91–92; cf. aus­si Con­st. past. Gaudi­um et Spes, 50.

[13] Con­gré­ga­tion pour la Doc­trine de la Foi, Déc­la­ra­tion sur l’avortement provo­qué, 9: AAS 66 (1974) 736–737.

[14] Jean-Paul II, Dis­cours aux par­tic­i­pants à la 35e Assem­blée Générale de l’Association Médi­cale Mon­di­ale, 29 octo­bre 1983: AAS 76 (1984) 390.

[15] Jean XXIII, Enc. Mater et Mag­is­tra, III: AAS 53 (1961) 447.

[16] Con­st. past. Gaudi­um et Spes, 24.

[17] Cf. Pie XII, Enc. Humani Gener­is: AAS 42 (1950) 575; Paul VI, Solen­nelle Pro­fes­sion de Foi, 30 juin 1968: AAS 60 (1968) 436.

[18] Jean XXIII, Enc. Mater et Mag­is­tra, III: AAS 53 (1961) 447; cf. Jean-Paul II, Dis­cours aux prêtres par­tic­i­pant à un sémi­naire d’é­tudes sur « la pro­créa­tion respon­s­able », 17 sep­tem­bre 1983: Inseg­na­men­ti di Gio­van­ni Pao­lo II, VI, 2 (1983) 562: «A l’o­rig­ine de toute per­son­ne humaine, il y a un acte créa­teur de Dieu; aucun homme ne vient à l’ex­is­tence par hasard, il est tou­jours le terme de l’amour créa­teur de Dieu ».

[19] Cf. Con­st. past. Gaudi­um et Spes, 24.

[20] Cf. Pie XII, Dis­cours à l’U­nion Médi­co-biologique «Saint-Luc », 12 novem­bre 1944: Dis­cor­si e radiomes­sag­gi, VI (1944–1945) 191–192.

[21] Cf. Con­st. past. Gaudi­um et Spes, 50.

[22] Cf. Con­st. past. Gaudi­um et Spes, 51: «Lorsqu’il s’ag­it de met­tre en accord l’amour con­ju­gal avec la trans­mis­sion respon­s­able de la vie, la moral­ité du com­porte­ment ne dépend pas de la seule sincérité de l’in­ten­tion et de la seule appré­ci­a­tion des motifs; mais elle doit être déter­minée selon des critères objec­tifs, tirés de la nature même de la per­son­ne et de ses actes, critères qui respectent, dans un con­texte d’amour véri­ta­ble, le sens inté­gral de la dona­tion mutuelle et de la pro­créa­tion humaine ».

[23] Con­st. past. Gaudi­um et Spes, 51.

[24] Charte des Droits de la Famille, pub­liée par le Saint-Siège, art. 4: L’Osser­va­tore Romano, 25 novem­bre 1983.

[25] Con­gré­ga­tion pour la Doc­trine de la Foi, Déc­la­ra­tion sur l’avortement provo­qué, 12–13: AAS 66 (1974) 738.

[26] Cf. Paul VI, Dis­cours aux par­tic­i­pants au XXIIIe Con­grès nation­al des Juristes Catholiques Ital­iens, 9 décem­bre 1972: AAS 64 (1972) 777.

[27] L’oblig­a­tion d’éviter des risques dis­pro­por­tion­nés indique un authen­tique respect des êtres humains et la rec­ti­tude des inten­tions thérapeu­tiques; elle implique que le médecin « devra avant tout éval­uer atten­tive­ment les con­séquences néga­tives éventuelles qu’une tech­nique déter­minée d’ex­plo­ration pour­rait avoir sur l’embryon, et (qu’) il évit­era de recourir à des procédés de diag­nos­tic dont l’hon­nête final­ité et innocuité sub­stantielle ne présente pas de garanties suff­isantes. Et si, comme il arrive sou­vent dans les choix humains, un cer­tain risque doit être affron­té, il se préoc­cu­pera de véri­fi­er s’il est jus­ti­fié par une urgence vraie du diag­nos­tic et par l’im­por­tance des résul­tats qui seront obtenus en faveur de l’embryon lui-même » (Jean-Paul II, Dis­cours aux par­tic­i­pants au Con­grès du «Mou­ve­ment pour la vie», 3 décem­bre 1982: Inseg­na­men­ti di Gio­van­ni Pao­lo II, V, 3 [1982] 1512). On doit tenir compte de cette pré­ci­sion sur le « risque pro­por­tion­né » dans les pas­sages suc­ces­sifs de cette Instruc­tion, toutes les fois qu’y appa­raît la même expression.

[28] Jean-Paul II, Dis­cours aux par­tic­i­pants à la 35e Assem­blée Générale de l’Association Médi­cale Mon­di­ale, 29 octo­bre 1983: AAS 76 (1984) 392.

[29] Cf. Jean-Paul II, Dis­cours aux par­tic­i­pants à un Con­grès de l’A­cadémie Pon­tif­i­cale des Sci­ences, 23 octo­bre 1982: AAS 75 (1983) 37: «Je con­damne de la manière la plus explicite et la plus formelle les manip­u­la­tions expéri­men­tales faites sur l’embryon humain, car l’être humain, depuis sa con­cep­tion jusqu’à sa mort, ne peut être exploité pour aucune raison ».

[30] Charte des Droits de la Famille, pub­liée par le Saint-Siège, art. 4/b: L’Osser­va­tore Romano, 25 novem­bre 1983.

[31] Cf. Jean-Paul II, Dis­cours aux par­tic­i­pants au Con­grès du « Mou­ve­ment pour la vie », 3 décem­bre 1982: Inseg­na­men­ti di Gio­van­ni Pao­lo II, V, 3 (1982) 1511: «Toute forme d’ex­péri­ence sur le fœtus qui pour­rait en altér­er l’in­tégrité ou en aggraver les con­di­tions, à moins qu’il ne s’agisse d’une ten­ta­tive extrême de la sauver d’une mort cer­taine, est morale­ment inac­cept­able ». Con­gré­ga­tion pour la Doc­trine de la Foi, Déc­la­ra­tion sur l’euthanasie, 4: AAS 72: (1980) 550: «A défaut d’autres remèdes, il est licite de recourir, avec le con­sen­te­ment du malade, aux moyens four­nis par la médecine la plus avancée, même s’ils sont encore au stade expéri­men­tal et ne sont pas exempts de quelques risques ».

[32] Nul ne peut revendi­quer, avant d’ex­is­ter, un droit sub­jec­tif à venir à l’ex­is­tence; toute­fois, il est légitime d’af­firmer le droit de l’en­fant à avoir une orig­ine pleine­ment humaine grâce à une con­cep­tion con­forme à la nature per­son­nelle de l’être humain. La vie est un don qui doit être accordé d’une manière digne aus­si bien du sujet qui la reçoit que des sujets qui la trans­met­tent. On devra égale­ment tenir compte de cette pré­ci­sion pour ce qui sera expliqué à pro­pos de la pro­créa­tion humaine artificielle.

[33] Cf. Jean-Paul II, Dis­cours aux par­tic­i­pants à la 35e Assem­blée Générale de l’Association Médi­cale Mon­di­ale, 29 octo­bre 1983: AAS 76 (1984) 391.

[34] Cf. Con­st. past. Gaudi­um et Spes, 50.

[35] Cf. Jean-Paul II, Exhort. apost. Famil­iaris Con­sor­tio, 14: AAS 74 (1982) 96.

[36] Cf. Pie XII, Dis­cours aux par­tic­i­pants au VIe Con­grès Inter­na­tion­al des Médecins Catholiques, 29 sep­tem­bre 1949: AAS 41 (1949) 559: Selon le plan du Dieu Créa­teur, «l’homme aban­donne son père et sa mère et s’u­nit à sa femme, et les deux devi­en­nent une seule chair » (Gen 2, 24). L’u­nité du mariage, liée à l’or­dre de la créa­tion, est une vérité acces­si­ble à la rai­son naturelle. La Tra­di­tion et le Mag­istère de l’Église se réfèrent sou­vent au livre de la Genèse, soit directe­ment soit à tra­vers les pas­sages du Nou­veau Tes­ta­ment qui y font référence: Mt 19, 4–6; Me 10, 5–8; Ep 5, 31. Cf. Athenagore, Lega­tio pro chris­tia­n­is, 33: PG 6, 965–967; S. Jean Chrysos­tome, In Matthaeum homil­i­ae, LXII, 19, 1: PG 58, 597; S. Léon le Grand, Epist. ad Rus­ticum, 4: PL 54, 1204; Inno­cent III, Ep. Gaude­mus in Domi­no: DS 778; IIe Con­cile de Lyon, IVe Ses­sion: DS 860; Con­cile de Trente, XXIVe Ses­sion: DS 1798, 1802; Léon XIII, Enc. Arcanum Div­inae Sapi­en­ti­ae: ASS 12 (1879–80) 388–391; Pie XI, Enc. Casti Con­nu­bii: AAS 22 (1930) 546–547; Con­cile Vat­i­can II, Con­st. past. Gaudi­um et Spes, 48; Jean-Paul II, Exhort. apost. Famil­iaris Con­sor­tio, 19: AAS 74 (1982) 101–102; C.I.C., can. 1056.

[37] Cf. Pie XII, Dis­cours aux par­tic­i­pants au IVe Con­grès Inter­na­tion­al des Médecins Catholiques, 29 sep­tem­bre 1949: AAS 41 (1949) 560; Dis­cours aux con­gres­sistes de l’U­nion Catholique Ital­i­enne des sages-femmes, 29 octo­bre 1951: AAS 43 (1951) 850; C.I.C., can. 1134.

[38] Paul VI, Enc. Humanae Vitae, 12: AAS 60 (1968) 488–489.

[39] Loc. cit.: ibid. 489.

[40] Pie XII, Dis­cours aux par­tic­i­pants au IIe Con­grès Mon­di­al de Naples sur la fécon­dité et la stéril­ité humaine, 19 mai 1956: AAS 48 (1956) 470.

[41] C.I.C., can. 1061. Selon ce canon, l’acte con­ju­gal est celui par lequel est con­som­mé le mariage si les époux « l’ont posé entre eux de manière humaine ».

[42] Cf. Con­st. past. Gaudi­um et Spes, 14.

[43] Jean-Paul II, Audi­ence générale, 16 jan­vi­er 1980: Inseg­na­men­ti di Gio­van­ni Pao­lo II, III, 1 (1980), 148–152.

[44] Jean-Paul II, Dis­cours aux par­tic­i­pants à la 35e Assem­blée Générale de l’Association Médi­cale Mon­di­ale, 29 octo­bre 1983: AAS 76 (1984) 393.

[45] Cf. Con­st. past. Gaudi­um et Spes, 51.

[46] Cf. Con­st. past. Gaudi­um et Spes, 50.

[47] Cf. Pie XII, Dis­cours aux par­tic­i­pants au IVe Con­grès Inter­na­tion­al des Médecins Catholiques, 29 sep­tem­bre 1949: AAS 41 (1949) 560: « Il serait faux de penser que la pos­si­bil­ité de recourir à ce moyen [fécon­da­tion arti­fi­cielle] pour­rait ren­dre valide un mariage entre per­son­nes inaptes à la con­tracter du fait de l’empêchement d’impuissance ».

[48] Une ques­tion ana­logue est traitée par Paul VI, Enc. Humanae Vitae, 14: AAS 60 (1968) 490–491.

[49] Cf. supra, I, 1 sq.

[50] Jean-Paul II, Exhort. apost. Famil­iaris Con­sor­tio, 14: AAS 74 (1982) 96.

[51] Cf. Réponse du Saint-Office, 17 mars 1897: DS 3323; Pie XII, Dis­cours aux par­tic­i­pants au IVe Con­grès Inter­na­tion­al des Médecins Catholique, 29 sep­tem­bre 1949: AAS 41 (1949) 560; Dis­cours aux con­gres­sistes de l’U­nion Catholique Ital­i­enne des sages-femmes, 29 octo­bre 1951: AAS 43 (1951) 850; Dis­cours aux par­tic­i­pants au IIe Con­grès Mon­di­al de Naples sur la fécon­dité et la stéril­ité humaine, 19 mai 1956: AAS 48 (1956) 471–473; Dis­cours aux par­tic­i­pants au VIIe Con­grès Inter­na­tion­al de la Société Inter­na­tionale d’Hé­ma­tolo­gie, 12 sep­tem­bre 1958: AAS 50 (1958) 733; Jean XXIII, Enc. Mater et Mag­is­tra, III: AAS 53 (1961) 447.

[52] Pie XII, Dis­cours aux con­gres­sistes de l’U­nion Catholique Ital­i­enne des sages-femmes, 29 octo­bre 1951: AAS 43 (1951) 850.

[53] Pie XII, Dis­cours aux par­tic­i­pants au IVe Con­grès Inter­na­tion­al des Médecins Catholiques, 29 sep­tem­bre 1949: AAS 41 (1949) 560.

[54] Con­gré­ga­tion pour la Doc­trine de la Foi, Déc­la­ra­tion sur cer­taines ques­tions d’éthique sex­uelle, 9: AAS 68 (1976) 86, qui cite la Con­st. past. Gaudi­um et Spes, 51; cf. Décret du Saint-Office, 2 août 1929: AAS 21 (1929) 490; Pie XII, Dis­cours aux par­tic­i­pants au XXVIe Con­grès de la Société Ital­i­enne d’Urolo­gie, 8 octo­bre 1953: AAS 45 (1953) 678.

[55] Cf. Jean XXIII, Enc. Mater et Mag­is­tra, III: AAS 53 (1961) 447.

[56] Cf. Pie XII, Dis­cours aux par­tic­i­pants au IVe Con­grès Inter­na­tion­al des Médecins Catholiques, 29 sep­tem­bre 1949: AAS 41 (1949) 560.

[57] Cf. Pie XII, Dis­cours aux par­tic­i­pants au IIe Con­grès Mon­di­al de Naples sur la fécon­dité et la stéril­ité humaine, 19 mai 1956: AAS 48 (1956) 471–473.

[58] Con­st. past. Gaudi­um et Spes, 50.

[59] Jean-Paul II, Exhort. apost. Famil­iaris Con­sor­tio, 14: AAS 74 (1982) 97.

[60] Cf. Déclar. Dig­ni­tatis Humanae, 7.

 

ADLAUDATOSI INTEGRAL ECOLOGY FORUM WEBINARS

Religious Helping Trafficking Victims along the Road of Recovery (ON-DEMAND VIDEO WEBINAR)

Religious Working In International Advocacy Against Human Trafficking (ON-DEMAND VIDEO WEBINAR)

Impact Of Human Trafficking On Health: Trauma (ON-DEMAND VIDEO WEBINAR)

Impact Of Human Trafficking On Health: Healing (ON-DEMAND VIDEO WEBINAR)

International Prosecution Of Human Trafficking — Where Are We Now? (ON-DEMAND VIDEO WEBINAR)

International Prosecution Of Human Trafficking — What can be done? (ON-DEMAND VIDEO WEBINAR)

International Prosecution Of Human Trafficking — Best Practices (ON-DEMAND VIDEO WEBINAR)

Demand As Root Cause For Human Trafficking – Sex Trafficking & Prostitution

OUR MISSION:

THE PURPOSE IS TO SHARE BEST PRACTICES AND PROMOTE ACTIONS AGAINST HUMAN TRAFFICKING.

WE MAKE AVAILABLE TO YOU GUIDES AND RESEARCH ON TRAFFICKING IN HUMAN BEINGS FROM THE MOST RECOGNISED LEGAL AND OPERATIONAL ACTORS.

Human Trafficking — Interview with Prof. Michel Veuthey, Order of Malta — 44th UN Human Right Council 2020

POPE’S PAYER INTENTION FOR FEBRUARY 2020: Hear the cries of migrants victims of human trafficking

FRANCE — BLOG DU COLLECTIF “CONTRE LA TRAITE DES ÊTRES HUMAINS”

Church on the frontlines in fight against human trafficking

Holy See — PUBLICATION OF PASTORAL ORIENTATIONS ON HUMAN TRAFFICKING 2019

RIGHT TO LIFE AND HUMAN DIGNITY GUIDEBOOK

Catholic social teaching

Doctrine sociale de l’Église catholique

Register to our series of webinars adlaudatosi on Human Trafficking

 
 

You have successfully registered !