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OIM — Fatal Journeys Volume 3 Part 1: Improving Data on Missing Migrants — 2017

OIM — Fatal Journeys Volume 3 Part 1: Improving Data on Missing Migrants — 2017
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https://publications.iom.int/fr/books/fatal-journeys-volume-3-part-1-improving-data-missing-migrants

Since 2014, more than 22,500 migrant deaths and dis­ap­pear­ances have been record­ed by the Inter­na­tion­al Orga­ni­za­tion for Migra­tion glob­al­ly. The real fig­ure could be much high­er, but many deaths are nev­er record­ed. Fatal Jour­neys Vol­ume 3 – Part 1 pro­vides a glob­al review of exist­ing data sources, and illus­trates the need for improve­ments in the ways that data on miss­ing migrants are col­lect­ed, analysed and communicated.

The report high­lights three key ways in which to improve the col­lec­tion, shar­ing and report­ing of data on miss­ing migrants. First, a grow­ing num­ber of inno­v­a­tive sources of data on miss­ing migrants, such as “big data”, could be used to improve data on migrant fatal­i­ties. Sec­ond, much more could be done to gath­er data to increase iden­ti­fi­ca­tion rates, such as devel­op­ing intrare­gion­al mech­a­nisms to share data more effec­tive­ly. Third, improv­ing data on miss­ing migrants also requires more thought and improved prac­tice in the use and com­mu­ni­ca­tion of such data. Improv­ing infor­ma­tion and report­ing on who these miss­ing migrants are, where they come from, and above all, when they are most at risk, is cru­cial to build­ing a holis­tic response to reduce the num­ber of migrant deaths.

Table des matières:
  • Fore­word
  • Acknowl­edge­ments
  • List of tables and figures
  • List of maps and text boxes
  • Exec­u­tive summary
  • Intro­duc­tion
  • Chap­ter 1 — Glob­al overview of the avail­able data on migrant deaths and dis­ap­pear­ances by Julia Black, Kate Dear­den, Ann Sin­gle­ton and Frank Laczko
    • 1.1. Intro­duc­tion
    • 1.2. Region­al analyses
    • 1.3. Who is most at risk
    • 1.4. Con­clu­sion and recommendations
  • Chap­ter 2​ — Using big data to study res­cue pat­terns in the Mediter­ranean by Kather­ine Hoff­mann, Jere­my Boy, James Leon-Dufour, Dun­can Breen, Christo­pher Ear­ney and Miguel Luengo-Oroz
    • 2.1. Intro­duc­tion
    • 2.2. Dis­cus­sion of best prac­tices: New data sources
    • 2.3. Data use cases
    • 2.4. Method­olog­i­cal challenges
    • 2.5. Con­clu­sion and recommendations
  • Chap­ter 3 — Mixed mes­sages: Media cov­er­age of migra­tion and fatal­i­ties by Aidan White and Ann Singleton
    • 3.1. Intro­duc­tion
    • 3.2. Ethics and report­ing realities
    • 3.3. Miss­ing links and media narratives
    • 3.4. In the pic­ture: Human­i­ty or the people’s right to know
    • 3.5. How vic­tims fig­ure in the minds of media
    • 3.6. Devel­op­ing good prac­tices and mon­i­tor­ing media
    • 3.7. Con­clu­sion and recommendations
  • Chap­ter 4 — Migrant bod­ies in Europe: Routes to iden­ti­fy­ing the dead and address­ing the needs of the fam­i­lies of the miss­ing by Simon Robins
    • 4.1. Intro­duc­tion
    • 4.2. Impacts on fam­i­lies of miss­ing migrants
    • 4.3. Pol­i­cy respons­es in Italy and Greece
    • 4.4. Con­clu­sion and recommendations
  • Chap­ter 5 — Iden­ti­fy­ing dead migrants, exam­ples from the Unit­ed States–Mexico bor­der by Robin Reineke and Chelsea Halstead
    • 5.1. Intro­duc­tion
    • 5.2. His­to­ry of the cri­sis and state of the data
    • 5.3. Foren­sic human iden­ti­fi­ca­tion along the Unit­ed States–Mexico bor­der: Prob­lems and challenges
    • 5.4. Foren­sic human iden­ti­fi­ca­tion along the Unit­ed States–Mexico bor­der: Cur­rent practices
    • 5.5. Non-gov­ern­men­tal efforts to assist med­ical exam­in­ers and fam­i­lies of the missing
    • 5.6. A fam­i­ly-cen­tred approach: The Col­i­brí Cen­ter for Human Rights
    • 5.7. Con­clu­sion and recommendations
  • Chap­ter 6 — The Bor­der Project: Towards a region­al foren­sic mech­a­nism for the iden­ti­fi­ca­tion of miss­ing migrants by Mer­cedes Doret­ti, Car­men Osorno Solís and Rachel Daniell
    • 6.1. Intro­duc­tion
    • 6.2. The Bor­der Project
    • 6.3. Chal­lenges
    • 6.4. Con­clu­sion and recommendations

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