Select Page

SWITZERLAND Federal Office of Police fedpol – Swiss Coordination Unit against the Trafficking in Persons and Smuggling of Migrants

SWITZERLAND Federal Office of Police fedpol – Swiss Coordination Unit against the Trafficking in Persons and Smuggling of Migrants

Télécharger (PDF, 130KB)

https://www.eda.admin.ch/deza/en/home/themes-sdc/migration/human-trafficking.html

Human trafficking – prevention and strengthening of local capabilities

Human trafficking is a modern form of slavery and a serious infringement of victims’ human rights. It typically involves forced labour, sexual exploitation or the removal of victims’ organs. Migrants are particularly at risk, as people are more vulnerable when they are outside of their own country and not covered by their own legal system. The SDC is committed to improving the prevention of human trafficking, protecting victims more effectively and developing local capabilities and social services through the provision of advice.

SDC focus

Switzerland regards human trafficking as a serious violation of human rights. The SDC is particularly involved in tackling this problem in eastern Europe and the South Caucasus. When it comes to human trafficking, these are not only countries of origin but also of transit and destination. The SDC’s activities include:

  • implementing information campaigns and raising awareness among young people, particularly marginalised groups within society (e.g. boarding school pupils and orphans)
  • strengthening national repatriation programmes for victims of human trafficking and, where possible, developing international programmes
  • strengthening regional networks, organisations and key players that are involved in the prevention of human trafficking and the assistance, repatriation and reintegration of victims of trafficking
  • contributing to interdepartmental working groups, such as the working group on international cooperation on migration and the Swiss Coordination Unit against the Trafficking in Persons and the Smuggling of Migrants, in order to ensure that Switzerland has a coherent domestic and foreign policy in this area

Background

Human trafficking is a global problem, one that has intensified over the last 20 years as globalisation has increased. The poorer the country, the easier it is for criminal trafficking networks to recruit people. Human trafficking is particularly widespread in Latin America, south-east Asia, and eastern and south-east Europe. Countries of transit and destination are typically industrialised countries.

By contrast with people smugglers, who generally transport consenting individuals to another country in return for payment, human traffickers make false promises in relation to employment or marriage and threaten or use violence in order to exploit their victims and enslave them. However, it is difficult to draw a clear line between these two types of activity.

The International Labour Organisation estimates that in 2012, 21 million people around the world became victims of human trafficking, either in their own country or abroad. Some 90% of cases involve forced labour. Of those, one-fifth concern sexual exploitation, while four-fifths relate to the agricultural sector, the building trade, industry or domestic staff in private households.

According to estimates by the European Commission and the Organization for Security and Co-operation in Europe, 55% of all victims worldwide are women or girls.

These days, human trafficking is one of the most lucrative crimes there is, on a par with the trafficking of weapons and drugs. The total financial proceeds of human trafficking worldwide are in excess of USD 10 billion.

Current challenges

Human trafficking is an international problem, one that has been exacerbated by the internet and the fact that travel has become so much easier. In order to effectively tackle human trafficking, preventive measures need to be implemented and victims need to be better protected. There is also a need to increase the number of prosecutions and conduct more intensive information campaigns in migrants’ countries of origin regarding the dangers of economic migration.

International cooperation is also important. Thus far, however, this has only addressed selected aspects of human trafficking, such as the trafficking of women and forced labour. Accordingly, further regulation and agreements are required at the international level.

About The Author

UN HEADQUARTERS, NEW YORK – PRACTICAL SOLUTIONS TO ERADICATE HUMAN TRAFFICKING FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 9, 2018

OUR MISSION:

THE PURPOSE IS TO SHARE BEST PRACTICES AND PROMOTE ACTIONS AGAINST HUMAN TRAFFICKING.

WE MAKE AVAILABLE TO YOU GUIDES AND RESEARCH ON TRAFFICKING IN HUMAN BEINGS FROM THE MOST RECOGNISED LEGAL AND OPERATIONAL ACTORS.

Catholic social teaching

Doctrine sociale de l’Église catholique

Pope Francis joins religious leaders of different faiths, in fight against modern slavery

Michel Veuthey talks about the Order of Malta’s involvement in fighting human trafficking

Gaudete et exsultate- A guide to Christianity for the 21st Century: the new Apostolic Exhortation of Pope Francis

QUELS SONT LES OBJECTIFS, LES MOYENS ET LES VALEURS QUI ANIMENT LA POLITIQUE EXTÉRIEURE DU VATICAN DIRIGÉ PAR LE PAPE FRANÇOIS ?

A WOMAN CAPTURED – Domestic slave for 10 years

THE ENOUGH PROJECT – END CONFLICTS & SUPPLY CHAINS

TED – HOW TO FIGHT MODERN SLAVERY (Kevin Bales)?

BLOOD AND EARTH : MODERN SLAVERY, ECOCIDE AND THE SECRET TO SAVING THE WORLD

NEW CANNIBAL MARKETS : GLOBALIZATION AND COMMODIFICATION OF THE HUMAN BODY

Photographer Lisa Kristine travels the world documenting the unbearably harsh realities of modern-day slavery

Recent Posts

Subscribe To Our Newsletter

Join our mailing list to receive the latest news and updates from our team.

You have Successfully Subscribed!

%d bloggers like this: